Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 01 April 2005, 07:26   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Lochgelly
Boat name: Purrdy
Make: Northcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mariner 135hp ob
MMSI: 235029446
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 46
Swinging mooring.

Hi folks, question for you.
I have just obtained use of a swinging mooring, very low water drying, at Northqueensferry.
It`s a buried JCB wheel and tyre with a very heavy chain on it. I am fitting a large buoy and swivel to the chain and intent to hopefully leave my rib on the mooring over long weekends.
Now the question.
Is there a self locking shackle or clip I can use to hook up to the swivel that has a very low to zero chance of coming adrift from my painter. I am not happy with my skill with bits of rope so wish to be able to clip on without using any knots.
If I have to I will use a shackle but that means mousing it every time.
The painter at the moment has a large Carbine clip on it but I don`t think this is secure enough.
Any Idea`s.
__________________

__________________
Nyarla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 07:36   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 6m +
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,850
You could always try a locking Karabiner, some lock using springs, some lock by you tightening a sheath around the shaft.

Have a look at the screwgate karabiners here , especially the Petzl - Am'D Ball Lock, which looks as though it would be very hard to accidently open.
__________________

__________________
Jimbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 07:48   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Swanage
Boat name: Little Blue
Make: Rimini
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mariner 75
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12
You might want to think about security and the chance of the painter chaffing through.

we use a 6 foot length of chain fixed to the underside of the buoy with a moused shackle. The chain is inside plastic tube to protect the boat and the end of the chain is padlocked to the deck fitting in the rib, a second side chain is fixed to the bow fitting with a Karabiner with a spring sleave to keep it shut.

This gives security with two fixing points, but the load is on the bow fitting not a chain laying on the tube.

Graham
__________________
Cheers

Graham B
Little Blue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 08:28   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: nr Lymington
Boat name: JU-JU
Make: Halmatic PAC22
Length: 6m +
Engine: 140.5 Mermaid
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Blue
...we use a 6 foot length of chain fixed to the underside of the buoy with a moused shackle. The chain is inside plastic tube to protect the boat .........to the bow fitting with a Karabiner with a spring sleave to keep it shut....
Graham
Same here except that you must take the chain from above the swivel or you will wind the chain around the buoy I havenít found an SS Karabiner with a sprung sleave yet so I use two normal ones in opposite directions Des
__________________
Scary Des is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 08:44   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Saltash, Cornwall
Make: Rib less:-(
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 693
Nyarla
Please don't mix stainless steel and steel chain or you will get electrolytic corrosion. Also when you are putting on the shackles there is a way to put them on so they tighten when they nag not loosen, but you should still mouse the shackles.
If you are going to buy a buoy avoid the ones with a metal rod up the centre with an inflatable collar, I have seen the rods break and the collars shred.
If you go with the type where you pass the chain up the center and it had a plate to hold it in place, put a big knot in the chain so if the plate fails the chain won't drop.
I keep my 7.4 on a fore & aft mooring when afloat which has a main load baring line connected to the eye with a quick link and a second safety line
loose over tubes made off to the cleat.
This was on the YBW site and quite of a few of them seem to lay their own.
http://www.ybw.com/forums/showflat.p...0/an/0/page/10

Hope it helpd
Jelly
__________________
Jelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 09:59   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
If you are going to use karabiners don't use the alloy climbing ones - not too good in salt water when attached to a steel chain!!!

Steel ones are a lot tougher

http://www.caving-supplies.co.uk/

Most climbing places don't stock steel because it is too heavy.
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 10:45   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth
Boat name: Cracking Day
Make: Tohatsu
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 150
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 265
Unless I was sitting on the waterside with a sniper rifle, I wouldn't leave my rib out in the middle of the water.
__________________
Tactical Paintball-Hampshire, Surrey and beyond!
www.crackingday.com
Andy Stevens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 11:20   #8
JIY
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Largs
Boat name: Spitfire
Make: XS850
Length: 8m +
Engine: 2 x 200 Verado
MMSI: 235905304
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 174
A word of caution - make sure that your insurance covers you when on a mooring. A local Ribster across here is having a major battle to get his insurers to pay up for damage sustained to his Rib when it broke free from a swinging mooring last year.
__________________
JIY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 12:48   #9
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Stevens
Unless I was sitting on the waterside with a sniper rifle, I wouldn't leave my rib out in the middle of the water.
Andy, I heard that the last guy you shot at sheltered in this iron bunker...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	shot_to_fcuk.JPG
Views:	132
Size:	140.5 KB
ID:	11168  
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 13:25   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth
Boat name: Cracking Day
Make: Tohatsu
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 150
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 265
I must have been in a good mood that day
__________________
Tactical Paintball-Hampshire, Surrey and beyond!
www.crackingday.com
Andy Stevens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 13:29   #11
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Stevens
I must have been in a good mood that day


And no, you can't have it for your paintball battlefield!
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 13:31   #12
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portsmouth
Boat name: Cracking Day
Make: Tohatsu
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 150
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 265
No, the french are very proud of their d-day defences!
__________________
Tactical Paintball-Hampshire, Surrey and beyond!
www.crackingday.com
Andy Stevens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 April 2005, 14:56   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Ardnamurchan
Make: Domar Corsair
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 20HP
MMSI: What?
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 215
Try the safety harness carabiners, they are designed for marine use, and will NOT come undone unless both edges are pressed (effectivly grasping the whole carabiner..) Just pressing the release mechanism wont open it, or just pushing against the clip that falls back wont open them, you have to do both at once... and they wont go rusty...

screw lock ones might get salt buildup in them, and refuse to open, and will take a while to open anyway, any other just dont seem safe/reliable with rope rubbing up against the carabiner..
As others have said, dont use climbing gear, they will just rust into pieces.. even galvanised things have gone rusty over here, its horrid...

Dad has stuck his away already again, so no pic, sorry!
__________________
Mr-d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 April 2005, 03:22   #14
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Lochgelly
Boat name: Purrdy
Make: Northcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mariner 135hp ob
MMSI: 235029446
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 46
Cheers for all the good info and links everybody.
Now if someone will come and wade out in the bottomless stinking mud to attach my riser chain etc that would be even better
Thanks again and anyone up in the Firth of Forth anytime give me a shout.
__________________
Nyarla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 April 2005, 07:24   #15
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Make: HumberOceanOffshore
Length: 8m +
Engine: Volvo KAD300/DPX
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 5,387
You take care in that mud. You could be there for a very long time.
__________________
JW.
jwalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 April 2005, 07:40   #16
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Ardnamurchan
Make: Domar Corsair
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 20HP
MMSI: What?
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 215
Go round the buoy with your boat and a length of rope, lay it along to the shore, and then get one of them plastic overalls and bellyslide! could even get people dragging you around by pulling the rope, fantastic!
__________________
Mr-d is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 April 2005, 10:00   #17
Member
 
Country: UK - N Ireland
Town: Bangor,Co Down
Make: Gemini/ Avon
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 166
re swinging mooring

I kept my P22 in Strangford Lough on a swinging mooring for years with no problem sitting in a 4 knot tide.I used a railway wheel with a length of 20ft steamer/ground chain.
I then attached 30ft of galvanised 1/4" riser chain which rose to the mooring buoy.The riser was adjusted so that on high water springs it only lifted the last link of the steamer/ground chain which meant there was no real drag put on the wheel.
The mooring buoy was one similar to the yellow buoys used by the HIES for visitors in Scotland.This meant that the riser chain passed up through the mooring buoy without a break and was attached to a large swivel which was in turn shackled to a small piece of lighter chain.This was then attached to the 'D' ring of the RIB with the biggest marine grade snap shackle I could find.
Worked well in all weathers and sea conditions.
__________________

__________________
Slaphead is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:02.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.