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Old 20 December 2019, 05:44   #1
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How to remove the clutch lever axle on a Suzuki DF5?

Hi,

The clutch lever of my Suzuki DF5 has become very hard to move. I have taken off the engine head to access the clutch lever axle, take it out, clean it and grease it.

However, after removing the retaining clip (#3 on parts diagram) and soaking the axle with WD40, the axle (#2) won't budge. I can barely move the lever back and forth, but the axle won't slide.

Can anyody think of a way of sliding the axle out?
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Old 20 December 2019, 05:56   #2
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Rather than WD40, you could try Plus Gas or another penetrating fluid.

WD40 is more of a lubricant.
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Old 20 December 2019, 06:45   #3
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I assume item 2 is one assembly with the square shaft somehow retained within it??

Is there access to put a block of wood opposite the shaft so you can knock some sort of metal wedge (chisel?) in to give a firm outward force on the end of the shaft. Obviously soak with WD40/Plus Gas or whatever you fancy then gradually heat around the seized area with hot air gun or blowtorch (but not torch if any part is plastic).
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Old 20 December 2019, 07:39   #4
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Stop using WD40.
Plus gas, Duck oil, diesel (as in the fuel), Loctite freeze'n'release or a 50/50 acetone/atf mix will all do much better.
Apply liberally & keep working the lever back & forth.
Aerosols will help to rinse muck out as you keep working.
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Old 20 December 2019, 08:11   #5
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All of the above penetrating fluids are a complete waste of time in this case. It is stiff due to the alloy casting corroding and gripping the shaft. No amount of lubricant will cure it. You need to try and work it while putting pressure on the shaft with wedges and pry bar. Hitting it won’t help you need constant pressure and keep working the lever. Press the shaft out and scrape out all the corrosion.
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Old 20 December 2019, 08:25   #6
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Boiling water (lots) might help
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Old 20 December 2019, 08:58   #7
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heat it up
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Old 05 January 2020, 07:31   #8
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Ok I've finally managed to take it out by heating the casing and using a clamp that pulled the lever out as I tightened it.

The inside of the lever casing was heavily corroded indeed, like most of the outside of the shaft.

I'd don't really understand how this could happen as I rinse the engine regularly and the electrodes don't look to bad.

I'm going to polish and repaint the shaft. Should I replace the electrodes as well?
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Old 05 January 2020, 07:58   #9
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No the anodes are fine. The spec is for them to have lost say 25%-50% of their volume before replacement and yours are hardly touched. Worth taking them off and cleaning up the contact areas though.

Re why the shaft seized up.. not sure how old your OB is but the general corrosion on your images is quite severe... looking more like a 30+yrs old OB. Image below is my 16yr old Yamaha 15hp showing the area near the gear shaft where all the paint remains in newish condition. I guess yours is an aux though which spends loads of time in heavy salt spray??
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Old 05 January 2020, 09:11   #10
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If re painting soak in vinegar over night to remove all salt and corrosion
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Old 05 January 2020, 12:44   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenlander View Post
Re why the shaft seized up.. not sure how old your OB is but the general corrosion on your images is quite severe... looking more like a 30+yrs old OB. Image below is my 16yr old Yamaha 15hp showing the area near the gear shaft where all the paint remains in newish condition. I guess yours is an aux though which spends loads of time in heavy salt spray??
No it's not that old, it's from 2009, so just 10 year old. I bought it used three years ago with my 20 ft trailer sailer, of which it is the main engine. I've no idea how it was used or misused before that, probably the latter. It's always been used at sea, and I wouldn't be surprised if the previous owner left it all year long on the boat on a mooring.

Next thing I'm going to remove all visible corrosion, clean it up, and repaint it. I'm also going to fit a grease nipple on the level casing so that I can lubricate it properly every year.
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Old 05 January 2020, 14:50   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenlander View Post
No the anodes are fine. The spec is for them to have lost say 25%-50% of their volume before replacement and yours are hardly touched. Worth taking them off and cleaning up the contact areas though.
Is it possible the anodes are isolated from the bits they are supposed to protect?

It's straying into bits I don't know about but would it be worth testing to ensure there isn't unlimited resistance between the anode and the various bare metal parts on the engine?
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