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Old 30 June 2015, 16:31   #1
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BARRUS FUEL TANK - replacing pick-up tube.

Hi.

My local Sea Cadet unit has a couple of Barrus RDG 062 fuel tanks which I'm checking over. Found one of the pick-up pipes inside the tank was soft and gloopy and - when pulled off and left to dry - crumbled into pieces in my hand! (Yes, I've cleaned the tank out now :-) )

I've seen a thread on here about this issue. What I'd appreciate is any guidance as to how to replace this pipe and what the best type of pipe to use is.

How is the fuel take-off fixing secured on the tank? No way is my hand able top through that opening, so I might have to collar my 13-year old son for that job instead (c'mon - he's in the cadets...)

Many thanks for any advice.
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Old 30 June 2015, 17:23   #2
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BARRUS FUEL TANK - replacing pick-up tube.

I did a couple a while back, dead simple to do. The pipe I used was actually off a chlorination plant from a water treatment works, meant to be for transporting neat chlorine, they only lasted a month with petrol.

Ended up using PROPER fuel pipe.

Unscrew the Mercury fuel connector, the black pick up pipe then unscrews from the tank, replace pipe then feed the pipe back through the small hole and screw the pick up back in to the tank


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I put some covers on the outlets too to stop them filling with sea water when not in use.

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Old 30 June 2015, 19:03   #3
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Great advice!
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Old 01 July 2015, 07:52   #4
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Perfect, A1an - thank you!

Ah, so no nut on the inside - that's a big 'phew' :-)

Much obliged.
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Old 01 July 2015, 07:57   #5
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No worries, I can't remember the inside/outside diameter of the hose I used, iirc it's quite a unique size though. Its a tight fit threading it back through the hole.

When you replace the pipe make sure its the correct length for using the tank both on its base or when its up ended. Don't ask me how I know.
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Old 01 July 2015, 08:05   #6
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Hee-hee!

I've looked at various fuel hoses, but what I can't tell - and one supplier wasn't able to answer - was whether the pipe is suitable for immersion in petrol, or is it just the internal layer that's fully 'petrol proof'.

Any good sources for a pipe that will cope with permanent soaking?

Thanks again.
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Old 01 July 2015, 08:26   #7
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You need to use the quicksilver silver fuel pipe. And to help it go down the thread you also need to shave it down a bit. I used a bench mounted grinding wheel.
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Old 01 July 2015, 08:47   #8
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Fab :-)

Thanks so much - really makes my life a lot easier!
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Old 01 July 2015, 17:17   #9
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Cool - fitting unscrewed (darn it was tight) and replacement pipe on the way.

Phew - pleased it was a simple unscrew job.

Fab - thanks :-)
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Old 08 July 2015, 08:18   #10
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I do a special fitting to convert these into a robust pickup pipe.

You can use the old mariner fitting or I can supply new smaller ones like these Honda ones...

I've done it now, looks like I'm gonna have to get a trade membership

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Old 09 July 2015, 02:38   #11
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Are you using a length of the quicksilver fuel pipe - as in the stuff that connects the tank to the engine - inside the tank or is the pipe like the thin walled stuff you find inside the quicksilver tanks?
If it's the latter where do you get it from as I could do with enough to replace the pipe inside a couple of 25 litre tanks.
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Old 13 July 2015, 06:42   #12
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Hi Whisper - that's a very neat mod .

Matt H - just as you said - a real tight fit, but very careful shaving did the job!

Hi Paintman. I used Quicksilver fuel line, the same stuff that's used for the main fuel line betwixt t'tank and t'engine. I chose this as it was recommended in this thread, but also after I checked it was a homogeneous material; one solid 'plastic' throughout its wall. Obviously if the inside can cope with petrol flowing through it, so can the outside with being immersed!

( Mercury/Mariner Quicksilver Outboard Petrol Fuel Line 8mm ID 5/16" Sold by M | eBay )

It was 8mm I/D and fitted nicely tight on the ~8.5mm fitting spigot (I warmed the pipe gently first). Ok, the threaded hole in the Barrus tank was ~15mm I/D, so with the considerable wall thickness of the pipe once fitted over the spigot it just wasn't going to go back through! It almost did, and I managed to get half-way through by 'screwing' it all back in, so that the fuel pipe had a thread grooved in to it. But that only got me part way, even with using silicone grease!

So, very careful whittling with a sharp craft knife got the diameter down to a snug fit, and I then successfully managed to screw the fitting + pipe back in to the tank.

There was plenty of wall thickness left - the vast majority - so I have no concerns about weakness there. I only pared off a half mm or so all around.

Job done - tanks with a new lease of life!

(In case if it's of interest, I also refurbished the two Barrus caps as the air vent inserts had rusted and seized - one had completely broken away. I also found that one of the rubber seal rings on the cap was completely perished, and the other was missing. Guess what fixed all this? A fab adhesive product called 'StixAll' by Everbuild.

This is amazing stuff, which sets to a very tough rubbery compound. It'll stick almost anything to almost anything! It is also incredibly inert, and a test dollop had no reaction to being immersed in petrol even though the stuff was straight out of the tube and hadn't even set. Ok, I need a long-term test on it being petrol resistant, but so far so very good.

Ok, two repairs here: the first was the air vent screw. I removed the brass vent screw and the steel sleeve it sat in. Clamped in vice, and managed to unscrew them apart. Cleaned up both with taps and dies, and gave it a smear of copper-ease. All very free and easy to use. I then refitted the parts, the sleeve from the inside and the brass screw from outside, and did them up so the sleeve was held firmly in the correct place. (I had removed all the badly rusted bits of the sleeve which were inside the cap - fortunately the actual sleeve part was intact.)

I then simply injected (it comes in a large cartridge which you use with a 'skeleton gun') the StixAll all around the sleeve and completely filled that central recessed area of the cap. Smoothed it off, left it out in the sun for a couple of days (quite a depth of StixAll!) and the air-vent fixing is now fully air tight in the cap and also fully secure.

I then cleaned up the groove where the O ring used to sit, injected a bead of StixAll all around this, and then ran a little metal former I'd trimmed out of thin sheet all around the stuff. Did this a few times, removing excess StixAll each time, until I was left with a raised, flat-topped 'O' ring literally moulded in place. (The former I used was simply a thin piece of scrap metal sheet (less than half-mill thick) cut with shears to an easy-to-hold size (around 50mm x 10mm) with the required 'O' ring shape cut out from one corner. This was approx 6mm wide x 1mm high. When I ran that shape around the cap insides, it left that raised 6mm wide x 1mm high 'rubber' StixAll band. (The actual formed 'band' is deeper than 1mm as there was also a ~3mm deep recess for it to sit in. So the whole formed StixAll band is approx 6mm wide and 4mm deep in total - and it's adhered to the cap, so shouldn't go anywhere!)

Allowed to fully set (it's really tough stuff) and then a goodly smear of silicone grease (completely inert lubricant) all over everything to protect it further, and to make actual use that much smoother and easier.

The cap has never been easier to use, and the tank is completely air tight when it's on.

A lot of work? Not at all. What possessed me to even try? Simple - new replacement caps are nearly 40 each... )
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Old 13 July 2015, 15:22   #13
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Thank you Time to get the stanley knife out!
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