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Old 07 January 2009, 14:32   #21
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Funny how the fire brigade always manage to put burning cars out with plain water..........
i.e. Professionals wearing protective gear and the benefit of endless training together with high pressure, high flow hoses. Slightly different to chucking a bucket of water
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Old 07 January 2009, 17:37   #22
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If you're not sure why you would disconnect the fuel supply - take 100 mL of petrol to a very open space put it in an appropriate container (say an old paint tin) and light it (actually thats harder than the "movies" would have you believe)... Once you see the height of the flames, feel the heat and smoke etc - and how long a little fuel takes to burn out - ask yourself if you want to be on a small boat with 200-2000x as much!

Bigmuz has a point about spills - but thats probably the only thing that the dry powder fire extinguisher we all carry would actually be useful for. I connect and disconnect my tanks every trip and have never had more than one or two drips from the fitting.

Not sure with a bucket you will actually get much water where its needed without removing the cowal. On my PB2 course the instructor suggested that a wet jacket could be used like a fire blanket.
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Old 07 January 2009, 17:48   #23
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Most of our thoughts are/will be based on a collective assumption of an average rib set up, many of which wont have a fire extinguisher on board, so what would most of you peeps do ? ,.. sit staring at it and phone the cg.... and wait for the whole boat to go up ,..or do something about it like douse it with water. I know fine well that there are categories of fire that are best served with certain responses, but in the middle of the sea, when you very least expect it ,..get the can out and save your hull so atleast after your electrics have fused you can get your radio working and make that call
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Old 07 January 2009, 18:07   #24
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When did you last get onboard a boat that didn't have a fire extinguisher? I've always regarded having one as essential as a compass.

You make a good point though-I guess you've got to do something-it's just trying not to make the problem worse when doing so.

I like Polwart's suggestion of a wet jacket as a fire blanket.
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Old 08 January 2009, 02:06   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigmuz7 View Post
...so what would most of you peeps do ?
Here's what I think I would do assuming it's an outboard fire and having watched the RNLI videos...

* Assume control
* Get the crew as far away as possible (that could be in the boat or out of it - to the upstream or to the side of it - depending on the circumstances of fire and sea state)
* Send a MayDay alert through the handheld or fixed radio if still working
* If safe to do so, tackle the fire with the fire extinguisher/fire blanket
* If safe to do so, disconnect the battery
* If safe to do so, deploy the sea drogue from the front to keep the smoke and flames downstream of any crew members still on board
* Work on the basis that the survival of the crew is paramount, the survival of the boat is irrelevant

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Old 08 January 2009, 04:11   #26
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I've got a small powder extinguisher. On deployment - there's probably not much more than 8-10 seconds before it's exhausted. Not long then.

I would have thought outboard engine fires are relatively scarce. What could be more of an issue is for smokers onboard. If you're out fishing with a smoker - it's only a matter of time before they want to light up.

Unfortunately my brother smokes, and I've seen him light up when we've been out fishing. Apart from being paranoid that we're in an inflatable RIB, there's also the 50 litres of fuel on board!!!

To go back to the original question - I think prevention is better than the cure. A petrol or engine fire would be as problematic on land as it is on water - without the security of being able to retreat from the fire.

My tuppence worth... keep a well-maintained engine. Check fuel hoses regularly and repair as required. Fuel containers to be properly sealed or vented (when in use) and look at location. Ideally no smoking while at sea.
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Old 08 January 2009, 08:33   #27
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I posted the same question on a fishing forum. Here's some of the responses from one particular guy when another member suggested putting a plugged hole in their cowl to discharge an extinguisher through (this was after he rambled on about complying with the British Waterways safety scheme) :-
Quote:
when an outboard is running it draws air through the cowling

when a fire starts beneath the cowling the hole in which oxygen is drawn in would act like the exhaust for the fire thus not alowing much oxygen in to keep the fire going

but dont you think that the manurfacturers think of fire when designing out boards thousand of pounds is spent on setting them alight and seeing what happens

its like cars when they see smoke coming from under the bonnet it only flared up when the bonnet was lifted

another safety factor that gets ingnored
After asking him directly twice, he answered the original question with:-
Quote:
i would tilt the engine and spray the extinguisher into the air intake and thus extinguish the fire
So, he's putting the point he's spraying the extinguisher in at the highest point where it'll be hardest to reach the fire and any burning fuel under his cowl could well be running out into the boat..
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Old 08 January 2009, 08:35   #28
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Your outboard catches fire.What would you do

Question how susceptible are dry powder co2 driven extinguishers to powder compaction/dampness on boats ? I had a B.C.F powder extinguisher in a rally car that failed to go off due to powder compaction when needed.
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Old 08 January 2009, 08:38   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVONMON View Post
Question how susceptible are dry powder co2 driven extinguishers to powder compaction/dampness on boats ? I had a B.C.F powder extinguisher in a rally car that failed to go off due to powder compaction when needed.
That's frightening. Was it in date?
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Old 08 January 2009, 08:47   #30
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Your outboard catches fire.What would you do

Yes it was & had a signed sticky label aswel & had been scrutineered.Believe B.C.F not in favour now due to carcinogenic potential and compaction problems.But what is the status with non professional use supplied boat extinguishers that we all seem to buy for @ 30 fit in our forard consuls and a wave tingling vessel called a R.I.B.
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