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Old 10 December 2002, 08:25   #11
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Sunday evening was good fun in Plymouth Sound but despite the 7 layers waterproof gloves and gortex hat was still a little nippy. No students froze to death so that is good. The weekend before I was out on the water in Salcombe at 6.30 am and it was surprisingly warm very dark but warm. Amazing the difference in temp between a NE and a SW wind. BOATING IS FUN ALL YEAR AROUND Whether it be an icicle series on a yacht or a blast in a rib. It is cold in the winter and preparation for the whole crew and communication between them is the key. When one is cold go in and get them warm!
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Old 10 December 2002, 08:32   #12
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When early Feb comes you wont be able to keep me of the water.

Nothing to do with liking winter Ribbing, I just dont get my RIB till then .

But on serious note I think you get some great days in winter and it makes it even better whan there is almost no one else out there.
And like Alan says why pay all that money and only use it half the year.

Regards Gary
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Old 10 December 2002, 12:03   #13
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The idea is definitely to stay in the boat in winter.


Er, yeh. I feel like that all year round. Don't you?

JW
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Old 10 December 2002, 15:43   #14
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Survival Times

This is taken from IAMSAR as I thought it would be interesting!

Survival time for persons not wearing protective clothing in water of various temps. I am sure the UK falls into 2-4 degrees as an absolute minimum.

Water Temp______Survival time
0-2_____________Less than 3/4 hour
2-4_____________less than 1 1/2 hours
4-10____________Less than 3 hours
10-15___________Less than 6 hours

Ideally you don't want to be out on your own. If you have novice crew take 15 mins at the start of the trip to show them the basic operation of the boat and how to pick up a MOB.

Then, you shouldn't be in too long if it doesn't quite go as planned.

And ALWAYS take some spare cloths etc.

Regards
Karl
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Old 10 December 2002, 15:51   #15
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Well, I'm glad I'll have my Ravenspring Drysuit for my next trip out at the end of this month (also for the Orkney Expedition...he he he he).

Right then excuse me for being ignorant (again [is that you Davison])) but what is 'IAMSAR' please.

Cheers

Keith Haaaaaaaaaart
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Old 10 December 2002, 15:58   #16
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Oooh, Ooh...let me guess, let me guess....

I nternational
A dvisory
M something
S earch
A nd
R escue

???? How did I do.
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Old 10 December 2002, 16:22   #17
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Sorry.

International Aeronatuical & Maritime Search and Rescue

A wadge of a manual with everything on S&R imaginable from on scene co-ordination to drift rates for bodys, boats, liferafts with / without drogues etc etc

karl
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Old 10 December 2002, 17:00   #18
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Don't you lot have WIVES?!!!!

Mine glares at me if I don't put it away and not use it by the end of November! That way I can concentrate on decotarating etc.! And I can't play with it again till March!

(And that goes for the RIB too!)

Mike - It's on my front lawn so I can see it - C)
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Old 10 December 2002, 17:51   #19
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KarlT,

What is the time in a survival / dry suite and what is the definition of such an item. I think that people need to be aware that if they are bombing around on their own and a tragic incident happens that throws them into the water, e.g. hitting a container (unlikely but not unknown), firstly could they cope in the water and secondly what means would they have to summon assistance. I guess you could only float for so long in your life jacket in the pitch dark before dying. It would be sad to lose someone because they thought it would never happen to them!

It would be interesting for people to have a practice in controlled circumstances to experience what it would be like with the same clothing on, getting into the water at that temp. The weight of the normal clothing now wet and heavy, WILL your lifejacket still keep you afloat, with waves lashing over your face, HOw do you know? Is your handheld radio on the boat or with you? I mention this because I did numerous exercises during my Commando training at Lympstone and later up in the Arctic circle with full kit on, I also experienced similar in the South Atlantic. I may not be up on the driving of RIB's but I am Commando, Arctic warfare and Arctic survival trained, trust me, I know about survival. Training, knowing your kit inside out and it's limits are paramount to surviving. You may fly by the seat of your pants at the moment, but trust me, one day, just one day, that preparation may save yours and others lives.

Pete
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Old 11 December 2002, 05:36   #20
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Pete
I don't know the factual answer to your question, but....if you get thrown out of your boat, in winter, alone and in the dark, which is perfectly possible of course, it might be useful to remind others of some precautions that could be taken.
-try to travel with another boat
-try to finish your journey late afternoon, rather than evening (after dark)
-ALWAYS wear drysuit, warm clothes under, and a lifejacket
-tell someone responsible your route plan and timing and when to press the panic button
-ALWAYS wear you kill switch
-dont be alone in the boat
I, personally....carry my handheld in a specially designed pocket in my drysuit. I also carry a fag packet sized torch/strobe in my drysuit.
The only thing I dont have which I think would be v. useful is a lifejacket with attached sprayhood (so I could smoke that occasional calming Marlboro.. no, no!!) to keep breaking waves, spray etc of my face and presumably to keep ones head a little warmer.
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