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Old 09 September 2005, 14:19   #1
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Why two bailers?

Hi All,

I am possibly going to buy the small bare boat 4.5m rib pictured. Can any of you rib folk enlighten me to why it has both an upper and lower bailer?
Bearing in mind that the lower of the two is below the deck area. The deck is supposedly bonded to the hull and as such there should be no water ingress into the hull area? Any explanation or advice is much appreciated.

Thanks Yoyo......
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Old 09 September 2005, 14:23   #2
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The lower lets you drain any water from the hull cavity. As you say it is sealed but I have yet to own a boat that doesnt take on any water at all! Water ofter gets in through deck fitting such as consoles or even incorrectly sealed bungs. It is very useful to have a bung and I belive it is good practice to remove the bung when the boat is out of the water.

Looks a smart boat,
regards
Alex
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Old 09 September 2005, 14:24   #3
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The upper of those drain holes will clear water from the deck whilst the lower one will clear water from under the deck.

These are not realy what i would call bailers - more drainage holes and they should remain closed with a screw in bung whilst on the water.

A bailer is a system that can be opened up whilst underway to clear water from a a swamped boat usually elephant trunk style ones are used on ribs.
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Old 09 September 2005, 14:44   #4
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thanks Guys for the rapid response!!!

It all makes sense now!!... If it is inevitable that some water will enter the hull then it should be ok to fit a sealed hatch in the bow deck for storage space etc? What do you think........See pic.

Yoyo
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Old 10 September 2005, 06:11   #5
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well - I suppose it depends on whats under there - but it is pretty usual to have a hatch there and to use that raised part as storage - of course the storage bin would have to have a wall at the back of it to prevent things moving back... (it may apready have...) - best bet - to be absolutely sure - would be to ask whoever made the hull
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