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Old 28 June 2013, 03:20   #31
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Beware the ASSAULT and the ATTAQUE are not the same design. The Assault is the least appealing of the craft you have mentioned for use in the Sound of Jura. I would search the forum for feedback before parting with cash. They are perfectly OK for a lot of uses, eg. dinghy club rescue boats where they don't go out for long distances in big waves, and the smaller engine demands of a shallow V hill make for a fuel efficient design and lower initial outlaw on a motor.
Plus 10!!! Assault is for fair weather boating. A completely different boat to te others.

Like a Suzuki jimny to a land river discovery!!!
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Old 28 June 2013, 04:59   #32
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OK, couple of thoughts:

Twin 40s = twin everything - Yeah, B*ll*x. - A 40 is a self sustaining engine with a pull start option. You could get away with no battery if you could be bothered pulling two strings at the beginning of the day. As it's an SR5.4 = no under deck tank so you are on portables anyway so wuill have one per side.....

That's a setup I was seriously looking at before I figured I coudn't get the garage door down behind it.


Attaque /Assault - yes, two very different boats. The O-Pro Predecessor is the one to go for given that choice. I have the Prequel to the prequel (i.e the one before the Attaque - mine is only rated for 60 Gee Gees & 110Kg on the transom - C. early 1980s vintage version, but hull shape not changed since). I used to swear by seariders until I got this. It's probably one of the most comfortable in big lumpy stuff 5m ribs I've driven.


I guess it might boil down to price and your thoughts on maintenance. "Holds air" could mean exactly what it says on the tin......
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:12   #33
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Its been knocking around on there for nearly a year
Reading the advert again, it seems to not have a trailer.
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:16   #34
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The 4.7 Searider is the best sub 5m rib ever built
Great liitle RIB's for sure Alex!!....But Best ever??..Theres some stiff completion... That new Ribtec they've put together for the Round Irland looks pretty Good!!....and the R.C 4.8 did OK on the Round Britain Challenge..Under floor Fuel storage is a pretty good Feature...Especialy in a Liitle un.
Oh... and I'd get a BIGGER GARAGE!
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:20   #35
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OK, couple of thoughts:

Twin 40s = twin everything - Yeah, B*ll*x. - A 40 is a self sustaining engine with a pull start option. You could get away with no battery if you could be bothered pulling two strings at the beginning of the day. As it's an SR5.4 = no under deck tank so you are on portables anyway so wuill have one per side.....

That's a setup I was seriously looking at before I figured I coudn't get the garage door down behind it.


Attaque /Assault - yes, two very different boats. The O-Pro Predecessor is the one to go for given that choice. I have the Prequel to the prequel (i.e the one before the Attaque - mine is only rated for 60 Gee Gees & 110Kg on the transom - C. early 1980s vintage version, but hull shape not changed since). I used to swear by seariders until I got this. It's probably one of the most comfortable in big lumpy stuff 5m ribs I've driven.


I guess it might boil down to price and your thoughts on maintenance. "Holds air" could mean exactly what it says on the tin......
Thanks for your input but as a layman I don't really understand what is being said, especially this bit
"Twin 40s = twin everything - Yeah, B*ll*x. - A 40 is a self sustaining engine with a pull start option. You could get away with no battery if you could be bothered pulling two strings at the beginning of the day. As it's an SR5.4 = no under deck tank so you are on portables anyway so wuill have one per side..... "

Are you saying that twin engines are not as bad as being made out? I am still considering the twins because I like the security of another engine although I I would not even contemplate an engine without electric start.
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:24   #36
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That new Ribtec they've put together for the Round Irland looks pretty Good


Doubt RibQUEST will be very happy with that comment.

That's the trouble with Ribtec, Ribcraft, Ribex, Ribquest, Ribeye....

Easily confused until you realise you are on the wrong one.

Hold on, the Ribeye aren't easily confused. Blue and white striped seats, boom box and full of wetsuit/drysuit clad chiildren hanging off the toobs .
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:31   #37
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Thanks for your input but as a layman I don't really understand what is being said, especially this bit
"Twin 40s = twin everything - Yeah, B*ll*x. - A 40 is a self sustaining engine with a pull start option. You could get away with no battery if you could be bothered pulling two strings at the beginning of the day. As it's an SR5.4 = no under deck tank so you are on portables anyway so wuill have one per side..... "

Are you saying that twin engines are not as bad as being made out? I am still considering the twins because I like the security of another engine although I I would not even contemplate an engine without electric start.
Twin engines normally (on bigger boats) will draw off the same big internal fuel tank and use the same battery source. Fuel and power are two of the biggest causes of problem in an engine. So there is an argument you don't quite always have a back up. HOWEVER in this case, the 40s are oldish and small and on a small boat with external fuel tanks. So even if the battery is dead, they could be started by hand and if you have dirty fuel or water in the fuel, it would be unlucky to have it in both of your tanks on the deck.

I maintain though that the low transom with twin engines (heavier than a single) will raise your waterline further which will cause you problems on the mooring. We had the SR 5.4 on one for 12 years and even with a bilge pump (they block) waves slosh over and eventually overwhelm the rib. It happened circa once a season in bad weather. The cost of this. The battery etc unless stored above the tubes/waterline will blow and the tanks may get water in. Plus if rough, the engine may get some water in it from waves, despite being above the tubes/flooded waterline when raised.

Blocking up the flooding hull will help slightly, but it only gains about an inch or two of extra waterline. When the tide turns and the stern is in to the waves, water comes over the transom.
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:40   #38
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Twin engines normally (on bigger boats) will draw off the same big internal fuel tank and use the same battery source. Fuel and power are two of the biggest causes of problem in an engine. So there is an argument you don't quite always have a back up. HOWEVER in this case, the 40s are oldish and small and on a small boat with external fuel tanks. So even if the battery is dead, they could be started by hand and if you have dirty fuel or water in the fuel, it would be unlucky to have it in both of your tanks on the deck.

I maintain though that the low transom with twin engines (heavier than a single) will raise your waterline further which will cause you problems on the mooring. We had the SR 5.4 on one for 12 years and even with a bilge pump (they block) waves slosh over and eventually overwhelm the rib. It happened circa once a season in bad weather. The cost of this. The battery etc unless stored above the tubes/waterline will blow and the tanks may get water in. Plus if rough, the engine may get some water in it from waves, despite being above the tubes/flooded waterline when raised.

Blocking up the flooding hull will help slightly, but it only gains about an inch or two of extra waterline. When the tide turns and the stern is in to the waves, water comes over the transom.
I have taken all that on board and it is a concern because the main reason I am buying a rib is to be able to leave it out in all but the worst of weather.

It will be sat on a swinging mooring though.
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Old 28 June 2013, 07:46   #39
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I have taken all that on board and it is a concern because the main reason I am buying a rib is to be able to leave it out in all but the worst of weather.

It will be sat on a swinging mooring though.
Ribs can sit in the worst of weather, but you need to keep the water out of the inside somehow.

Ours was a swing. Tide and wind have different effects on the boat.

Have a look at it in the water and look at the water line on the transom.

You will definitely need a bilge pump though and without a well at the rear, it will constantly be slightly full of water. With the pump only pumping to about 2" on the deck, that is a lot of water, which will raise the waterline on the transom even further!! Then when rough, the bow lifts, the water rushes to the back, drops the stern further and then waves come over filling it up and overwhelming the bilge. Worth considering.

How to cure it? Firstly glass up the flooding hull. Don't buy the kits, theyare crap at the rear, but the plugs for the front venting holes do work. A good boat builder can then cut a hole in the rear of the deck in to the void and then sit a box in it to create the well!! Just make sure once the deck is cut, it is sealed very well so water doesn't get in to the deck itself.

Problem is, smaller ribs just aren't designed to be left on a mooring all summer season.

If it does flood though, it won't sink, it will just have water up to the tube line/transom line. If your battery is above that waterline, ie in a console rather than on the deck in a box, it should be ok. If your fuel tanks have the vent shut and are floating, you can hop on, drop the engine, start her up and power on. Water rocks backwards over the transom, then with the elephant trunk down it will drain out slowly.
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Old 28 June 2013, 08:00   #40
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Ours was a swing. Tide and wind have different effects on the boat.
No tide worthy of the name in Gigha Ardminish is sheltered from the prevailing winds so very little wave action. I'd imagine that a moored boat there will face into the wind most of the time.
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