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Old 11 July 2012, 13:47   #51
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life jackets, good engine , good boat , dont go out in bad weather , read the sea charts and learn your route before you go, look for possible obstacles and what you need should you encounter them and take it with you, the read the weather forecasts and use your brains. Is my generic safety summary.
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Old 11 July 2012, 13:48   #52
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Thanks everyone you really have helped educate me . Great site.
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Old 11 July 2012, 13:49   #53
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Try fuel as well, that helps
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Old 11 July 2012, 13:53   #54
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Think about boating , then think about rock climbing, equally dangerous only one sport seems to be a little bit pathetic when it comes to making sure they dont hurt there little selfy welfies! Arrrrr. LOL am I right or what. If a rock climber was like a boater they would have a lift with a porter not a rope.
No your perception of risk associated with rock climbing is probably wrong! Statistically you are more likely to die playing table tennis (Risk of dying and sporting activities).

How many people walk into Tiso buy a climbing rack, rope and harness and then set off with no training - because it doesn't look that hard? Most people who have climbed a few times with a friend don't feel confident enough to head off into the wilds on their own, they either continue climbing under the supervision of their experienced friend as an 'apprentice' or they go and get some proper training. As with boating there is no certainty that your experienced friend is not introducing bad habits or techniques which are now considered outdated; although since their life usually depends on it to there might be more of a motivation to get it right.
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:03   #55
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life jackets, good engine , good boat , dont go out in bad weather , read the sea charts and learn your route before you go,
you don't need to 'learn it' but writing it down as a passage plan or sketch on some water proof paper will help you think it though.
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look for possible obstacles and what you need should you encounter them and take it with you, the read the weather forecasts and use your brains. Is my generic safety summary.
KILL CORD
ANCHOR
MEANS OF CALLING FOR HELP

would all be on my 'essential safety' list. I also think of suitable clothing as a safety item as for the first couple of hours it is just for comfort but whilst you are bobbing up and down waiting for your shore contact [you did let someone know you were going out didn't you?] to realise you are overdue and report you missing it might save you or your passengers lives.

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Try fuel as well, that helps
indeed - I think the most common cause of lifeboat call outs to motor boats is running out of fuel so having a spare can of fuel on board is important.
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:06   #56
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Think I already covered all that unless I am typing in white ink again Or is it because I am not an RYA instructor so I can't be believed

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If you don't know that then I doubt you will be safe. You need to find a local forum member or someone else to help teach you basic stuff, any old fool can get a boat and head out to sea, but when the turn around or look back could lose sense of direction, you then just need some fog or bad weather or run out of fuel then you are in trouble, so do that FIRST.

For safety you need to ensure that the vessel is seaworthy as is the engine, if it is electric start have a good battery and a plan if the battery fails.

Have a second means of propulsion 1e.g. wing engine, oars

You will need lifejackets FOR ALL

Check the pressure of the tubes before you go out

Get a radio (if you have passed the course to use it and be licensed) or at very least a mobile phone in a 'waterproof cover' with the phone number of the coastguard logged in.

Tell a friend when you are going out, where you are going a a time you will be back, they they don't hear from you they will know something could be wrong.

Ensure that you have enough fuel and perhaps a little spare in another container, it is amazing how quickly it can run out and surprise you.

There are charts called 'tough books' I think, they are smaller sections of the coast in a waterproof format, but if you can blag a plotter even black and white all the better, but make sure you can understand it, same with the charts.

Have an anchor with a minimum of 2mtrs of chain for your size of boat and enough line for the areas you are visiting.

Take some basic tools and a torch

Take a spare line that can be used for towing or as a throw line.

Some smart phones have the capability for downloading charts, these are useful in an emergency as they will give you an idea of where you are dependent on the hardware you are using e.g. does it have built in GPS? otherwise it is done by signal triangulation not so accurate but not bad.

Make sure you have a KILL CORD, this will stop the engine if you depart from the RIB, if you don't the RIB could just circle around you and cut you up into pieces GET ONE!

Take some fresh water to drink and perhaps some carbohydrates in the event you need food for any reason.

Ensure you have the correct clothing for the weather, remember it can change quickly.

Flares if possible AND KNOW HOW TO USE THEM

That is a start, I am sure others will chip in, good luck and BE SAFE
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:09   #57
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Absolute bare minimum IMHO - VHF, lifejackets for all, flares and anchor/rope. And tell someone where you're going and when you'll be back (costs nothing).
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:10   #58
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It is isn't it, I am typing in white ink and I can't ask how to change the colour because none of you can read this, can you?
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:12   #59
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Think about boating , then think about rock climbing, equally dangerous only one sport seems to be a little bit pathetic when it comes to making sure they dont hurt there little selfy welfies! Arrrrr. LOL am I right or what. If a rock climber was like a boater they would have a lift with a porter not a rope.
I used to climb E7 and I can tell you with absolute certainty that rock climbing (not mountaineering) is miles safer than boating.
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Old 11 July 2012, 14:14   #60
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It is isn't it, I am typing in white ink and I can't ask how to change the colour because none of you can read this, can you?
lol
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