Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 12 September 2017, 11:29   #1
eze
RIBnet supporter
 
eze's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Essex
Boat name: undecided
Make: Humber - Assault
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 60 hp efi
MMSI: next year
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 105
What defines a deep v planing hull?

Hi folk,

Just a quick enquiry here;

What defines/ constitutes a deep v planing hull as opposed a shallow v planing hull?

I am kind of assuming it is the angle of the 'V'

thank you

eze
__________________
eze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 September 2017, 11:35   #2
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: S. Carolina
Boat name: D560
Make: Avon
Length: 5m +
Engine: 2016 Merc 115hp CT
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,251
Quote:
Originally Posted by eze View Post
Hi folk,

Just a quick enquiry here;

What defines/ constitutes a deep v planing hull as opposed a shallow v planing hull?

I am kind of assuming it is the angle of the 'V'

thank you

eze
Transom deadrise of more than 20 degrees or so.
__________________

__________________
Richard
Gluing geek since 2007
Opinions and intepretations expressed are solely my own and do not express the views or opinions of my employer
office888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 September 2017, 11:46   #3
eze
RIBnet supporter
 
eze's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Essex
Boat name: undecided
Make: Humber - Assault
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 60 hp efi
MMSI: next year
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 105
thanks for the quick reply office
__________________
eze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 September 2017, 13:48   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,318
Rigid Inflatable Boats - a vast range of quality ribs for both leisure crafts and sports craft from Humber Inflatables

The assault is sold as a deep V but has a planning pad at the stern to help it plane easer at low HP and should go really well with 40-50 hp I had an osprey kestrel with a similar hull with a 40 mariner on years ago and it went very well.
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 September 2017, 16:11   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Waterlooville
Boat name: Tickler
Make: Halmatic P22
Length: 6m +
Engine: Inboard Diesel 140HP
MMSI: 235115642
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 601
RIBase
Another reason for a planing pad is to keep the draught down on a deep v hull.
__________________
GuyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 September 2017, 06:46   #6
Member
 
Last Tango's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Denny
Boat name: Hebridean Storm
Make: Coastline
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mariner F150
MMSI: 235107505
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,473
I'd say a "deep V" would be around 25 degrees dead-rise.
20 degrees would be a "medium V"
__________________
Last Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 September 2017, 07:30   #7
Member
 
Country: Ireland
Town: Castlebar
Boat name: Clewless
Make: Valiant DR 490
Length: 4m +
Engine: 60 hp ETEC
MMSI: Awaitng one
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,329
RIBase
Could a plaining pad be taken out off the hull of a rib. i.e. put on a pointy end back onto the hull. How hard would this be and would it be worth the effort?
__________________
two stroke mick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 September 2017, 07:31   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Last Tango View Post
I'd say a "deep V" would be around 25 degrees dead-rise.
20 degrees would be a "medium V"
near enough, for info below dont think theres a set angle as all boats differ

https://www.tropicalboating.com/2010...-deadrise-hull
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 September 2017, 07:32   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by two stroke mick View Post
Could a plaining pad be taken out off the hull of a rib. i.e. put on a pointy end back onto the hull. How hard would this be and would it be worth the effort?
it would give drag as the hull wouldnt pierce the waves
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 September 2017, 07:48   #10
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: S. Carolina
Boat name: D560
Make: Avon
Length: 5m +
Engine: 2016 Merc 115hp CT
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,251
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
it would give drag as the hull wouldnt pierce the waves
Depending on the size, the size of the delta / planing pad may decrease wave-piercing performance, and increase pounding if not properly designed (oversized). The boat tends to slam and stop on the flat section, rather than gracefully cut and glide until displacement takes over.

This is why the early generation Avon Adventure 560 rides poorly in rough conditions. If you examine the Searider vs the Adventure, you can see the size of the delta was substantially increased on the rear 1/3 of the hull. It gives amazing planing performance, but at a loss of comfort in rough conditions.

If you look at the hull of the Zodiac Hurricane 733, you'll see it barely has any planing pad to speak of.

Jet drives are another animal entirely, they usually have a rounded section towards the stern in order to boost pump performance.
__________________

__________________
Richard
Gluing geek since 2007
Opinions and intepretations expressed are solely my own and do not express the views or opinions of my employer
office888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:45.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.