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Old 01 October 2006, 11:33   #1
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Weigh Anchor!

I am interested to know what type of anchor you guys prefer to use and why?

Bruce,…Plough,…. folding grapnel,….rusty old seagull….etc. what are the pros and cons for choosing a suitable anchor for say a 5m rib, space being one of them obviously.

thanx.
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Old 01 October 2006, 11:54   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yoyo
I am interested to know what type of anchor you guys prefer to use and why?

Bruce,…Plough,…. folding grapnel,….rusty old seagull….etc. what are the pros and cons for choosing a suitable anchor for say a 5m rib, space being one of them obviously.

thanx.
I have an XS600 with 115 opti and use a 5kg bruce, and regularly leave it ovenight on this anchor and to date have never had a problem with it not holding.


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Old 01 October 2006, 12:11   #3
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I would probably choose a Bruce. Grapnels are a waste of space with virtually no holding power except amongst rocks - in the solent it is either mud or sand most of the time
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Old 01 October 2006, 13:24   #4
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YoYo

For your boat a Bruce or Danforth would be fine, 5kg, or 7.5kg if you have the space to store, with at least 6m of of 6mm chain and good length of warp (at least 30m of 8mm).

I tend to carry a 10kg Danforth & 10kg Grapnel both with 12m of 8mm chain and 50m of 10mm warp on any ribs that are between 5.5m - 8m.

Every lifeboat shout I have been out on this year that was serious, would not have been serious if the casualty would of had a bigger Anchor, more chain and more warp.

Jono
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Old 01 October 2006, 13:56   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boatcareuk
Grapnels are a waste of space..
Bollocks. I have a grapnel and a bruce. I've only ever used the grapnel. Much less hard work than the bruce when you'r puling it back up!
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Old 01 October 2006, 14:05   #6
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Originally Posted by Richard B
Bollocks. I have a grapnel and a bruce. I've only ever used the grapnel. Much less hard work than the bruce when you'r puling it back up!
How do you know if you have never used your Bruce.? Grapnels only work if they catch on a reasonable large rock bottom. However if you use enough chain and warp you can get by with one in mild conditions only and/or short periods of time. IMHO.
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Old 01 October 2006, 14:51   #7
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How do you know if you have never used your Bruce.?
Because it's much, much heavier than the grapnel! Even getting it out of the locker is a major task.
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Grapnels only work if they catch on a reasonable large rock bottom. However if you use enough chain and warp you can get by with one in mild conditions only and/or short periods of time. IMHO.
Always worked for me, albeit after a short drag. And I've only ever wanted to anchor in mild conditions and for short lengths of time (on a RIB, anyway!)

The trouble with anchors with great holding is that they continue to have great holding when you want to recover them! So unless you go to the faff of rigging a tripping line it can be a chore. I once had to abandon a very expensive stainless steel danforth which was well dug into the mud. Fortunately it was on a drying area so I could retrieve it by foot the next day.
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Old 01 October 2006, 15:10   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton
Every lifeboat shout I have been out on this year that was serious, would not have been serious if the casualty would of had a bigger Anchor, more chain and more warp.

Jono

Interesting - are you saying that most small boats carry an anchor that is far too small then?

Mine has a Danforth, its what came with the boat and I've never used it. I'm not even sure how long the chain & warp is ... one of these days I must pull it out and have a look before I need it in anger....

I was just looking at the Danforth website and it says a 9lb anchor will do up to a 27ft boat in 20kt winds. I don't know a damn thing about anchoring but I don't think I'd want to push my luck too far with that combination .... 4kg doesn't sound like much to hold a 9m RIB to me!?
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Old 01 October 2006, 15:47   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton
YoYo

Every lifeboat shout I have been out on this year that was serious, would not have been serious if the casualty would of had a bigger Anchor, more chain and more warp.

Jono
Likewise here. A good portion of our salvages could have been averted with proper ground tackle and usage. Although I must say that in most cases its not the size or type of anchor but rather, poor deployment. Not enough scope being the biggest culprit followed by fouling due to dropping everything down all at once in a big pile.

The key is matching the anchor, chain, and rode to the bottom type, depth of water, the size of the boat including windage, and the conditions you are going to be anchoring in. We have found that a Bruce is a great all around anchor for most bottom types but is hard to stow.

In soft bottoms like sand and mud the key is to make sure the anchor digs in, otherwise you are just depending on the weight and once the wind and seas pick up you may drag.
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Old 01 October 2006, 17:34   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
The trouble with anchors with great holding is that they continue to have great holding when you want to recover them! So unless you go to the faff of rigging a tripping line it can be a chore. I once had to abandon a very expensive stainless steel danforth which was well dug into the mud. Fortunately it was on a drying area so I could retrieve it by foot the next day.
Anchors are generally really easy to break out once you apply a vertical pull on them - ie once the boat is vertiaclly above the anchor. Was anchored (stormbound) once in 30ft yacht with winds in excess of F8 continuously for several days (anchor chain was bar taught) but anchor still came out relatively easily once we'd motored forwards to the point where we were pulling it straight up. Exception is of course when it's fouled something......

Just a note of caution if using a trip line - the anchor tends to spin as you lower it and either wraps the trip line round the chain or the anchor (either of which is bad). You can lower the anchor with the trip line (instead of main chain) until it's on the bottom and then release the trip and play out the normal chain. I've seen lots of people throw the anchor out and not dig it in and I've also seen lots of people dragging anchor! You only realise the trip has fouled (or acnhor has fouled) when you start to dig in and realise the boat is slowly but surely moving back. => always make sure your anchor has dug in well and has not fouled the trip line.

I personally like the plough / CQR type of anchor but they are really RIB un-friendly (sharp point) and not easy to stow unless you've got a reasonable locker.
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