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Old 08 February 2014, 07:14   #1
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Wave jumping .....

Having 'inadvertently' launched a bit higher than intended off the wake of an inter-ile ferry last season, I find myself questioning the practice:

Is it:

a:Part of the fun
b:Hooligan behaviour not to be advised

if a, if there a method so that it's done 'properly' and without risk to boat/occupants/other craft etc.

I'm into my third season with the boat and have been gradually learning her and all that ribbing entails so all advice is welcome and appreciated.

Cheers,

715
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Old 08 February 2014, 07:22   #2
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part of the fun, but make sure your crew know what your about to do
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Old 08 February 2014, 07:23   #3
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As with skiing

Bend zee kneez
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Old 08 February 2014, 07:24   #4
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My personal take is that it's a phenomenon generally found in calm waters where there is an audience. When I get calm water, I look at the horizon and nail it in the knowledge that there will be lots of waves I'll HAVE to hop without looking for extras.

Is it a problem? Only if you flip the boat or hurt someone. Then you look like a complete nob.
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Old 08 February 2014, 08:05   #5
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There is a spectrum - it can be stupid or it can be part of how you learn to tackle big waves for when its not a choice.

If you are going to do it, then common sense goes a long way:
  1. make sure everyone is wearing a well fitted lifejacket
  2. double check before your final approach that you've not inadvertently forgotten the kill cord [and test it at start of day]
  3. make sure everyone on board is securely "seated" with good hand holds - not perched on tubes or sitting in the bow
  4. make sure everyone on board knows what to expect and is either paying attention (and experienced enough to know) or there is an agreed shout
  5. pax should be expecting to absorb the shock with their legs - like jumping off a wall
  6. have a bail our plan if something goes wrong in the final seconds (e.g. someone on board no longer seems "seated") [and have an agreed 'sign' so people can indicate a problem to you over engine/wind noise
  7. keep a good lookout - often there are other people dead set on a 'jump' course and a high speed collision is not good; equally if the jetski in front screws up and ends up in the water you don't want to damage your prop mince him, sailing boats don't always maintain straight courses and can "stall" suddenly too; watch out for small craft like sibs or kayaks that can disappear on the far side of a wake
  8. beware of moving prohibited zones around large vessels, and beware that many smaller vessel skippers don't like being buzzed - give them space - the sea is big. With high speed ferries they can crash stop very quickly - so if some idiot tries to cut in front of them you might suddenly find yourself aiming for their aft quarter rather than what you expected to be wake
  9. generally the plan should be to cross the wake a comfortably and dry as possible rather than see how far out the water you can get (although others here seem to disagree!) - engine trim and timing the power are the tools here - I think JK recommends Neil Holmes if you really want to learn how to control high powered craft in tricky situations - but any Advanced Powerboat Instructor should be able to give you pointers to achieving the basics.
  10. you need a plan (and really a well briefed crew) about what to do if it all goes wrong and the boat ends up flipping or someone falls out, or you stuff so badly (or land stern down) and drown your engine/electrics.
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Old 08 February 2014, 08:46   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revenger715 View Post
Having 'inadvertently' launched a bit higher than intended off the wake of an inter-ile ferry last season, I find myself questioning the practice:

Is it:

a:Part of the fun
b:Hooligan behaviour not to be advised

if a, if there a method so that it's done 'properly' and without risk to boat/occupants/other craft etc.

I'm into my third season with the boat and have been gradually learning her and all that ribbing entails so all advice is welcome and appreciated.

Cheers,

715
I suppose u can class it as hooligan behaviour , but then again it is a good crk
only when u get it wrong then it can get very painful like 8 500mg tramadol and a can of red bull pain
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Old 08 February 2014, 08:53   #7
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All part of the fun....
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Old 08 February 2014, 09:21   #8
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I suppose u can class it as hooligan behaviour , but then again it is a good crk
only when u get it wrong then it can get very painful like 8 500mg tramadol and a can of red bull pain
glass back
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Old 08 February 2014, 09:27   #9
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It's cool when you it right...

You have to know how your boat handles when airborne though..

As with everything at the extreme ends of the performance of a boat....you got to know what going on...
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Old 08 February 2014, 09:41   #10
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You need to learn the knack of reading the water ahead and judging the size of a wave or wake. Appropriate throttle control is key, don't hit a big wave at WOT throttle, back off (to tickover if necessary), but keep the bow up as you don't want to "stuff". Throttle back if airborne so as not to over rev if prop is out the water, but go back on the power just before landing. Remember semi displacement motor cruisers produce MASSIVE wakes far bigger than you expect. Keep your hand on the throttle ALL THE TIME. Oh, last of all have fun.
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Old 08 February 2014, 09:54   #11
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And keep the jumps low (close to the water). Very serious injuries are a distinct possibility from big airborne jumps (usually passengers not helms). Remember the throttle controls the height of the jump.
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Old 08 February 2014, 10:01   #12
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i suppose he dnt get it right Looey
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Old 08 February 2014, 10:06   #13
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Also take into account the boat/ship that the wake your jumping on because last thing they want if there about to negotiate a tight channel or making a course alteration. Is for some pleb buzzing around them trying to jump the wake.

We had a complete knob who kept going head onto my boat then going down either side (no indication of which one) and then cutting in as close to the stern as possible to try and jump what little wake my landing craft had.

All turned out ok in the end though as we had a MOD police launch about 1/2mile behind us who promptly bollocked the pleb.

There is a time and place for wake jumping and portsmouth main channel is not it.
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Old 08 February 2014, 10:26   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willk View Post
My personal take is that it's a phenomenon generally found in calm waters where there is an audience. When I get calm water, I look at the horizon and nail it in the knowledge that there will be lots of waves I'll HAVE to hop without looking for extras. Is it a problem? Only if you flip the boat or hurt someone. Then you look like a complete nob.

You've got a pal that has a big Redbay who's good at it

Sent from my iPhone using Rib.net
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Old 09 February 2014, 04:39   #15
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This is my first year with our RIB and dealing with the larger wakes comfortably has been my biggest challenge , I have spoken with many people on the subject, including a few instructors but the advice never seems consistent! :-)

Cross it at right angles, cross at 45 degs, ignore it and just let it pass, keep the speed up, throttle back, throttle off ( that one hurts when you drop in the trough behind! )
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Old 09 February 2014, 05:24   #16
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This is my first year with our RIB and dealing with the larger wakes comfortably has been my biggest challenge , I have spoken with many people on the subject, including a few instructors but the advice never seems consistent! :-)

Cross it at right angles, cross at 45 degs, ignore it and just let it pass, keep the speed up, throttle back, throttle off ( that one hurts when you drop in the trough behind! )
My advice would be; do not get too hung up on the rights or wrongs on wave jumping there are way too many different craft, wave height/shape, set-ups, load, weather conditions, etc,etc.

It will come with experience just err on the side of caution whilst you gain that experience, rather like jumping in a new car and going for a drive in an unfamilier area you would take it easy whilst you got to know that car and the road.

It will come, just dont try to run before you can walk

Good luck, and enjoy
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Old 09 February 2014, 05:57   #17
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I have spoken with many people on the subject, including a few instructors but the advice never seems consistent! :-)

Cross it at right angles, cross at 45 degs, ignore it and just let it pass, keep the speed up, throttle back, throttle off ( that one hurts when you drop in the trough behind! )
Are you trying to attack it or just get past it safely? (Sometimes the best way to get past is to attack) All that advice is probably right - but its all about timing.
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Old 09 February 2014, 06:02   #18
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Mostly pass it safely as I have to start somewhere and being confident in being able to do that will lead to more adventurous helming. :-)
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Old 09 February 2014, 07:23   #19
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last thing they want if there about to negotiate a tight channel or making a course alteration. Is for some pleb buzzing around them trying to jump the wake.
Pleb? Since when did plebeians own ribs?
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Old 09 February 2014, 09:44   #20
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You want to jump at 90 degrees to the wake if possible, otherwise you'll land on one side.
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