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Old 27 January 2012, 18:28   #1
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Water caught behind the tubes

I think the tube has pulled away from the hull in the rear corner and allowed water to get in. When I shake the boat on the trailer I can hear it sloshing around.

It's a 5.4m Searider.

Does anyone have any idea how to get it out?

Thanks in advance
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Old 27 January 2012, 18:33   #2
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Is the water in the hull or the tube?
Don't understand how water would get into hull if tube has come adrift as that isn't what seals it.
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Old 27 January 2012, 18:37   #3
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Is the water in the hull or the tube?
Don't understand how water would get into hull if tube has come adrift as that isn't what seals it.

I don't think the water is in the hull or the tube, I believe it is between the tube and the hull (outer side) if that makes sense? The tube is quite light and doesn't feel as if there is any water in there although could be?

With the tube deflated I can hear is sloshing about, haven't tried with it inflated.

Saying that I guess it could be in the hull but I don't think it would stay over to one side like that?
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Old 27 January 2012, 18:49   #4
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Well the hull does have vertical plates running the length of the boat between the floor and the hull itself. These are for bracing but having seen them exposed they do create separate chambers beneath the floor running the length of the vessel. They should have drains between them allowing bilge to the lowest point........and this can be drained. Sometimes these joining drain holes are blocked or non existent.
Do you have an inspection hatch in the floor and/or a drain out of the transom or is it sealed?
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Old 27 January 2012, 18:56   #5
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Well the hull does have vertical plates running the length of the boat between the floor and the hull itself. These are for bracing but having seen them exposed they do create separate chambers beneath the floor running the length of the vessel. They should have drains between them allowing bilge to the lowest point........and this can be drained. Sometimes these joining drain holes are blocked or non existent.
Do you have an inspection hatch in the floor and/or a drain out of the transom or is it sealed?
There is an inspection hatch but it doesn't reveal a lot as the space between the deck and hull (4-5 inches or so) is filled with foam, I don't know if this is from the previous user or if it comes like it? I'm pretty sure it's not part of the sandwich layer or GRP.

There is no drain out of the transom bar the flooding hull exit
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Old 27 January 2012, 19:05   #6
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Foam is not necessarily a standard feature here. It defeats the point of a flooding hull. I reckon you've got water in the hull and it's trapped in a side channel and maybe it's the foam that's preventing it draining. If the boats on the dry for any length of time leave everything (hatches,drains etc.) open to allow it to dry as much as possible. Tilt the boat on the trailer and get one side higher than the other to help the water find it's way out.
It's one of those invisible problems that can only be tackled step by step.
Ideally you want to lift the deck, remove the foam and reseal. But this is an ideal situation.
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Old 27 January 2012, 19:16   #7
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Foam is not necessarily a standard feature here. It defeats the point of a flooding hull. I reckon you've got water in the hull and it's trapped in a side channel and maybe it's the foam that's preventing it draining. If the boats on the dry for any length of time leave everything (hatches,drains etc.) open to allow it to dry as much as possible. Tilt the boat on the trailer and get one side higher than the other to help the water find it's way out.
It's one of those invisible problems that can only be tackled step by step.
Ideally you want to lift the deck, remove the foam and reseal. But this is an ideal situation.
The hull can still flood without the foam being effected as it is sandwiched between the lower hull and deck. I'll open it all to dry and hopefully will drip out. The foam layer could probably be quite easily removed via the inspection hatch if necessary?
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Old 27 January 2012, 19:28   #8
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Yes, the hull can flood but the foam will soak as the hull floods between the hull and deck.
Sounds like when the hull drains, the foam still holds some water. After a ride that water will shake itself clear of the foam and this is the loose water that you hear after you recover the boat. The foam shouldn't be there. The hull is actually designed to flood fully to provide stability when diving etc., and to self drain when under way ( assuming the drains have been opened ). Once drained, and they do self drain within minutes when under way, the space between the hull bottom and the vessel floor should be "dry". Foam will prevent this..........a sponge if you will.
I reckon that's your problem.
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Old 27 January 2012, 19:58   #9
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Yes, the hull can flood but the foam will soak as the hull floods between the hull and deck.
Sounds like when the hull drains, the foam still holds some water. After a ride that water will shake itself clear of the foam and this is the loose water that you hear after you recover the boat. The foam shouldn't be there. The hull is actually designed to flood fully to provide stability when diving etc., and to self drain when under way ( assuming the drains have been opened ). Once drained, and they do self drain within minutes when under way, the space between the hull bottom and the vessel floor should be "dry". Foam will prevent this..........a sponge if you will.
I reckon that's your problem.
I've just checked it again and the foam has been sealed in with a thinn layer of GRP, so there is now a middle layer in the hull which I guess is where the water must be trapped. The inspection hatch is sealed in as well, no idea why as it's now completely useless.

Leaving the hull with trapped water could lead to osmosis so would it be wise to remove the unnecessary foam?
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Old 27 January 2012, 20:12   #10
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Don't think osmosis will be your problem..........that's usually years of permanent immersion, tens of years.
Leave it in the sun with everything open for as long as you can......dry the boat out.
Then make sure all the seals are watertight and you should be good.
Get it dry, and don't let any more water in.
Many SR owners seal the hull permanently.......glass in all the holes as they don't use the flooding hull ( good design though it is).
If you don't need to flood it this may be the way forward as the hull design is exemplary.
I reckon everybody on here has had a SeaRider at some stage and many still do. It's the default RIB.
My opinion is that an SR is one of the best buys you'll ever make...........so don't let a damp hull get in your way.
Find a way of drying it out, keep it dry and get out and get wet!
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