Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 01 July 2002, 14:03   #61
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: St Mawes
Boat name: Magellan Zulu
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Suzuki DF150
MMSI: 235094135
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 483
Thanks for that Brian. I'll go check out Kelkoo, Unbeatable.co and the rest to see who, pricewise, can cut the mustard.

Jason, I'll sort the piccies ASP. Today we discover that our chemist, the only source in St Mawes no longer can fix D&P. So it's a couple of trips to Falmouth and back by ferry. Could all now take a while... but I'm on the case.
__________________

__________________
Mike G
Mike Garside is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 July 2002, 02:52   #62
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Portishead, Bristol
Boat name: "
Make: Ribcraft, Cowes Mari
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mercury 90hp 4-strok
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 600
Send a message via AIM to jools
Sony also do waterproof cases for their range of digital still and video cameras

Maybe worth a look (I'm looking for a video case!)

Jools
__________________

__________________
www.ribpanther.co.uk
jools is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 July 2002, 04:23   #63
RIBnet supporter
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Isle of Man
Town: Peel, IOM
Boat name: Saffron
Make: Scorpion
Length: 8m +
Engine: I/B Diesel 315hp
Join Date: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,219
RIBase
Jools
I have a Sony underwater housing (going v. cheap) plus lights plus charger for lights.
If you are interested I will send piccies and more tech info.
Brian
__________________
Brian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 July 2002, 02:43   #64
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Berkshire and Devon
Make: Lodestar
Length: under 3m
Engine: Mercury 5hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Sounds like a great party, guys.

Just to add another angle to the photography stuff, I'm a follower of the "cheap and cheerful" school of thought...

I use a Fuji @xia ix-100 which costs under £100 - at that price I can afford the risk of it dropping overboard. It's a 1.3 megapixel camera, so probably not as nice piccies as a Canon Powershot, but I'll post some pictures (gallery section) taken off Salcombe last weekend so you can see for yourself.
__________________
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 July 2002, 10:25   #65
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West London
Make: ribcraft
Length: 4.8
Engine: Mariner 50 4stroke outboard
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 11
Charity and I very much enjoyed meeting everyone and we both say 'Thank you very much' to Brian for organising it. It was good cruising in company. Returning to Helford River was the longest passage I have made.

Yes the overfalls off the Lizard were interesting.

This time with Charity on board, (and similar occasion by myself off the Needles), I have treated them more or less the same as I would a big breaking wave in a kayak - get on the top, and let them subside underneath rather than power over them/ surf down the face. Then power out of the trough up the next one. (Well, not quite like a kayak - you can't 'power up' the back of a big wave with a paddle in your hand!) Doing this, SOG was around 8 knots when on top of the wave.

Is this the right technique? Seems a bit sort of passive to me, but I am nervous of being more adventurous without a demo/ guidance from a more experienced RIBster. Or a video!

Mike - looking forward to your pictures! The easiest way to distribute them would be to ask your friendly D&P shop to put them onto a CDrom as well as giving you the negatives/ prints. Then you could post selected images onto the Forum, or email them direct.
__________________
RobertJL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 July 2002, 15:16   #66
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: St Mawes
Boat name: Magellan Zulu
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Suzuki DF150
MMSI: 235094135
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 483
Robert - I am absolutely the LAST person who should be replying to your post on driving a RIB with a following sea. My experience is virtually NIL. However, I do have a bit of time doing the same thing in different types of sail boat and there are probably parallels.

The first time I tried and used what had to be the wrong technique was 22 years ago. I was bringing my new heavy displacement yacht into Bridport - a narrow harbour entrance if ever there was one - with a heavy sea breaking behind me. I figured that surfing down the front of the waves using the (very small) engine to assist, was the right way to go. It wasn't. I very nearly killed Di who was sitting on the bow, and almost destoyed the boat as she broached between the two pier ends of the harbour.

The next time, a year later, off the East coast of Australia I was crossing a sand bar with a breaking following sea. and I used the engine, this time in reverse, to slow me down and let the waves pass me. This allowed me to hold a straight course, safely.

Conversly, driving a very light displacement race boat in huge Southern Ocean folowing seas I soon discovered that the best technique was to sail them fast and use max power of the wind and surfing acceleration to power down the front of waves. The key was to do so diagonally so you did not plow into the back of the wave you were overtaking and come to a shuddering halt before being pooped by the next following sea.

This flies in the face of the accepted wisdom of using sea anchors or wharps to slow one down, letting the seas overtake. But this technique of using speed to avoid danger, provided you can prevent the boat from broaching, has become accepted practice amongst sailors that race in big following seas.

On our trip home the other day the waves were not big and so being pooped was not a concern. Nevertheless, the sea was big enough to increase speed on the front of a wave or to slow down seriously as a wave passed beneath one. When driving Bryan's RIB, I found the most fun was to accelerate off the top, diagonally towards the trough, easing back on the throttle as I did so. It was then necessary to power up again to avoid being caught by the following wave and get to the top ready to surf again.

No idea if this is accepted practice but it was someting the power of the engine allowed me to do in a light boat. It worked and was fun.

Anyone out there now ready to tell me the RIGHT way it should be done?
__________________
Mike G
Mike Garside is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 July 2002, 04:05   #67
RIBnet supporter
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Isle of Man
Town: Peel, IOM
Boat name: Saffron
Make: Scorpion
Length: 8m +
Engine: I/B Diesel 315hp
Join Date: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,219
RIBase
I think you do the following (I am going to be shot down in flames by people who REALLY know as soon as this is posted, of course):

Trim the nose of the boat up.
Go faster than the wave.
Take the power off just as you reach the crest of the wave, so the nose drops and you dont fly off the crest.
As soon as you begin to go "downhill", put power back on so you lift the nose, avoid broaching, and climb up the top of the next wave.
Take the power off just as you reach..........
and so on for about 10 hours !!
__________________
Brian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 July 2002, 04:55   #68
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West London
Make: ribcraft
Length: 4.8
Engine: Mariner 50 4stroke outboard
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 11
Mike, Brian,

Thank you for that advice.

I will let you know how it works for me!!

Regards, Robert
__________________
RobertJL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 July 2002, 05:10   #69
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Poole
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 673
For what its worth, and that isnít a lot, here are my thoughts.

Brian is absolutely correct in the theory of what to do in a following sea.

In a really big sea, which I reckon is when you start wondering why youíre out there or when the waves are bigger than the boat, it is sometimes worth taking a zigzag course. On one occasion in my Scorpion I was going from Lymington to Poole in big seas, foaming/breaking crests, and I could still achieve 25-30knots by running up the waves and choosing when to cross over the other side and run down into the trough

If your unsure rather than take a head-on or following sea change the angle of attack to make the course more comfortable. Iíve had a couple of occasions when Iíve had to do this and although it makes the journey longer I have felt safer and in more control.

A couple of weeks ago on my way to Torquay we went through Portland Race and surfed on some of the breakers which in a 2.8 ton boat is extremely exhilarating. Unfortunately I couldnít let go of the wheel & throttle to hang 10.

Also a final thought in a following sea, keep looking behind you !!!!

Regards

Mark
__________________
MarkWildey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 July 2002, 10:01   #70
RIBnet supporter
 
Brian's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Isle of Man
Town: Peel, IOM
Boat name: Saffron
Make: Scorpion
Length: 8m +
Engine: I/B Diesel 315hp
Join Date: Nov 2000
Posts: 2,219
RIBase
.....of course, thats the theory. I dont actually do that at all.
What I do, is get bored, light a fag, which takes my eyes off the sea and slows me down a bit. The following wave then catches me up and begins to push me sideways. I look up, panic, open the throttle and take off over the top of the wave in front. too late, I then realise I am hurtling, like an arrow, straight at the middle of the wall of the wave in front. The world then goes green.
The boats forward motion comes to an abrupt stop. I continue to hurtle forwards at 30 knots usually hitting something hard and sharp with my soft little body. The world becomes very cold and wet. Things float around inside boat and my fag goes out.
The brain slowly engages gear and I open the throttle again, only more gently this time. The boat points skyward and you wonder if your electric pumps have fused. Slowly things turn back to normal, the boat empties of water, speed picks up, the sun comes out. I dry one hand, by waving it in the air and light another fag.
This takes my eyes of the sea....... and so on for about 10 hours.
Mr. Marlboro loves me.
__________________
Brian is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 17:56.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.