Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 18 March 2009, 10:40   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: millbrook
Make: avon
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 14
Transom Trouble

Boat : Avon 5.5 SIB - 1970's !!

Well, I went out to put a couple of coats of varnish on the transom last night. Started sanding the existing stuff back, ended up chiseling lumps of rotten plywood.

Looks like I'll be mostly replacing the transom this weekend then.

The plan is to pull the transom out, get hold of a couple of sheets of marine ply, laminate the ply together up to 40mm thickness. 'Borrow' next doors bandsaw to cut the new transom. Thinned coat of varnish all over transom to seal it. Glue it back in place. Apply lots of coats of varnish.






Sounds simple, can't imagine that it will be.

Any tips?
__________________

__________________
spidermonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:03   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Ayrshire
Boat name: Raven
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: 150 suzuki
MMSI: 235040525
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 653
Quote:
Originally Posted by spidermonkey View Post
Boat : Avon 5.5 SIB - 1970's !!

Well, I went out to put a couple of coats of varnish on the transom last night. Started sanding the existing stuff back, ended up chiseling lumps of rotten plywood.

Looks like I'll be mostly replacing the transom this weekend then.

The plan is to pull the transom out, get hold of a couple of sheets of marine ply, laminate the ply together up to 40mm thickness. 'Borrow' next doors bandsaw to cut the new transom. Thinned coat of varnish all over transom to seal it. Glue it back in place. Apply lots of coats of varnish.



Sounds simple, can't imagine that it will be.

Any tips?


The varnish has more than likely caused the rot in the first place by stopping water getting away after it's got in behind the varnish.


I would'nt varnish the finished wood,sand it to as smooth a finish as you can get, then Dek oljeys (I think thats how you spelt) the wood, really soak it in it.
They use this stuff on teak decks,to protect from sun salt etc. There may be better suggestions to come, from more knowledgable folk than me,but I've done it that way and know it works.
__________________

__________________
.
IBWET is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:03   #3
Member
 
benc's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: Intrepid
Make: Tornado
Length: 7m +
Engine: Twin 150 Yamaha HPDI
MMSI: 235066402
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,319
Send a message via Skype™ to benc
Ah man, thats not good. Good luck with the repair - im sure someone will comment shortly. Plenty of experience here!

Hope to see you on the solent someday whens its all done
__________________
benc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:29   #4
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Someone makes a rot treatment; it's similar to a really thin epoxy mix designed to penetrate the damaged wood, then cure up stronger than the original (unrotted) material.

Here's one:
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...t.do?docId=263

I've seen repairs to glass boats where the transom cap was cut off (must be an interesting feeling to go after your boat with a chainsaw), rotted wood picked out, a repair solution was basically poured in to fill all the voids, and the transom cap rebuilt.

For yours, I'd assume, if you went this route, that you'd have to come up with some sort of form to contain the goo.

Or you could, as you're doing, replace the entire transom piece. Make sure you seal the entire piece, and seal any holes that are drilled later.

Have you thought about replacing the wood with a fiberglass transom?

jky
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:31   #5
K&S
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Glasgow
Boat name: Riberty
Make: xs 650
Length: 6m +
Engine: suzuki 175
MMSI: 235063328
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 377
What about thining some epoxy as a base coat then some more unthickened epoxy over that (with maybe a layer of surface tissue for extra strength?)
Got to be harder wearing and less maintenance long term?
__________________
K&S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:38   #6
Member
 
chewy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Up Norf
Make: Avon SR4,Tremlett 23
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yam 55, Volvo 200
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,217
I did a similar thing but mixed normal amounts of resin and added some wood stain.
It came out fine, harder wearing than varnish but looked just the same.
__________________
chewy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 11:39   #7
K&S
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Glasgow
Boat name: Riberty
Make: xs 650
Length: 6m +
Engine: suzuki 175
MMSI: 235063328
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by K&S View Post
What about thining some epoxy as a base coat then some more unthickened epoxy over that (with maybe a layer of surface tissue for extra strength?)
Got to be harder wearing and less maintenance long term?
Ignore the 'unthickend' bit.... thats something i need to do lol


Also you could add pigment to the final layer of epoxy and match your tubes
__________________
K&S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 12:35   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: millbrook
Make: avon
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by K&S View Post
Also you could add pigment to the final layer of epoxy and match your tubes
Do you know where I can get dirty, oxidised, faded, grey pigment from ?

I don't think its worth repairing as there are a couple of other dubious areas.

jyasaki - A GRP one is my second option, and having seen the price of marine ply might be the cheaper option (got some mat and other bits and bobs knocking about). I'd have to build it myself though and that would add a fair bit of time to this 2 minute varnishing job that I started last night.

Thanks for all the replies guys, looks like there's not much work being done today by some of us
__________________
spidermonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 17:05   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: millbrook
Make: avon
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 14
I got the transom off. Was surprisingly easy, though I was helped by the fact that the wood was soaking wet at the base and the hypalon practically fell away.







Now I've just got to decide whether to build a wooden one or a glassfibre jobbie. Anyone done this before?
__________________
spidermonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 March 2009, 17:10   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
I'd go with wood. looks like water got in behind the wheel mounting bolts ?
__________________

__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:48.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.