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Old 11 January 2017, 08:58   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by two stroke mick View Post
If mounted to the A frame there is a risk of losing it overboard and the rope becoming tangled in the prop. Think before you attach it to anything

TSM
Good point. I am veering towards having it mounted in a cage to hand in the cockpit.
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Old 11 January 2017, 11:10   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by two stroke mick View Post
If mounted to the A frame there is a risk of losing it overboard and the rope becoming tangled in the prop. Think before you attach it to anything

TSM
All thowbags ive seen are floating line, but i take your point.
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Old 11 January 2017, 11:19   #13
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Originally Posted by Ian M View Post
As a diver coxswain for many years I have yet to use a throw line in a real world situation. Granted divers do not go in the water when the surface conditions are 'tricky'.
So for me it is a balance of probabilities, possibly influenced by what you use your RIB for. Do you want a line permanently attached with the risk of it forming a trip hazard, balanced against the time taken to obtain the line from a boat locker. In my experience, surface situations do not develop instantaneously, and so are generally not that time critical.
Edit; just realised that I have thrown lines in the past, but always to other boats and seconds were not at issue.
Thowbags are not permanently attached, that would defeat the point, but firmly attached, and simply removable. Mine is usually velcro strapped on , no knots, too tricky with cold fingers in a hurry.
There is no trip hazard as it is in bag, mine is the size of a 2 litre pop bottle, so easy to put in a place not in the way.

Of course the use you put your boat too really determines what/how you set it up for.
General usage how often are you likely to need to assist someone else so maybe no need?
If you do a lot of safety cover then its a different scenario.
By the same logic, I don't dive any longer,so having a dive rack would be pointless but for a dive boat its almost an essential. each to his own
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Old 11 January 2017, 14:40   #14
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Had mine in a rack which was attached to the back rest of the seat, strait pull out to dispatch
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Old 12 January 2017, 16:18   #15
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A little tip, if you're going to carry a throw bag please practice on land, there is a technique to them. In the swiftwater rescue world we have to be able to get a shot on target, recover it and get it back on target in 20 seconds which sounds easy but really isn't.

They're one of those things that really get much easier with practice. Stand a pop bottle or cone or whatever a few metres away and practice throwing overhand, underarm, sideways etc.
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Old 19 January 2017, 11:47   #16
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Originally Posted by Phil M View Post
Great for getting divers away from rocks with less risk of grounding or impact and for diver recovery in rough conditions where driving at them is too risky. Mine lives easily to hand on the tank rack, just behind the drivers seat.
I've used my rescue/throw bag for getting divers out of kelp fields without having to motor in to get them. Deployed several times in this manner (and once to get a couple of elderly capsized kayakers to my boarding ladder.)

Mine lives clipped to the top crosspiece of my A-frame (takes a lot of sun, though; it gets replaced every few years.) I like being able to grab it and deploy without moving from the helm.

jky

Added: In a high wind situation where an accurate throw is tricky, you can get the line in the water and drive the boat in a slow circle around the victim. The line will cut the corner and be pulled onto the victim.
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