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Old 12 May 2006, 10:25   #21
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..so what's the fundamental difference between a "K"ort nozzle and a "C"ort nozzle ? Or is the same as Oil of Ulay and Oil of Olay....
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Old 12 May 2006, 11:19   #22
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Originally Posted by ADS
Put your hand bag away
Yeah, 'coz it's got a portapak in it and it'll kill ya!!
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Old 12 May 2006, 11:52   #23
ADS
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Originally Posted by Alice
Yeah, 'coz it's got a portapak in it and it'll kill ya!!

Lend it to Hugh, to balance out his Osprey
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Old 12 May 2006, 14:08   #24
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Safety boat people need to be properly trained (i am not saying he was not). At my club i prevent anyone from doing it without doing level 1+2 having plenty of practice before doing the safety boat. I find the skill with safety boat is just that, skill of controlling the boat properly.

The reason i did this was simply prevention, before i decided this they were allowed to do safety boat with level one and two at the club i help out at, but after watching them (some) and one person running into the jetty, it was clear that they needed help - i actually blame the previous instructor as standards were poor
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Old 12 May 2006, 14:28   #25
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... and I was a part of a fabricating team that built CORT NOZZLES!!!!
Must have been splashed then!!!

http://www.kortpropulsion.com/
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Old 12 May 2006, 15:17   #26
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Guards good or bad...

I am currently on my ship.. we have two Pacific 22's onboard.. one is slow and crap and one zips along.. one has a prop guard and is our 'rescue' boat for MOB and one is used for boarding operations..
The rescue boat.. designed to get to a casualty as quick as possible takes up to 3 mins to launch so if needed quickly those vital seconds you loose by having a prop guard may result in death.. We also use jet pacs.. but the guys driving them usually don't have the control of conventional props due to lack of practise and from the bridge we see them do all sorts..
I do safety boating as coxswain and have done for a long time.. My school sailing club used to let us as long as had a safety boat ticket. I did my safety boat ticket at 15 before they brought in age limits.. We never had any problems of people being injured by rescue boats. One accident per year? Does not warrant a knee jerk reaction of everyone fitting prop guards to rescue boats. If your confidence in boat driving is limited then get a prop guard or practise. If you can get up to a casualty without killing them then go for it..Practise it regulary.. I can 'park' a 30,000tonne ship next to a MOB dummy without sucking him through bow thrusts and main props.
Lets not dismiss boat designs.. you use an Avon searider 5.4 as a rescue boat.. at low speed you can see over the bow and pick a casualty up from the bow. you drive an avon 5.6 adventure. with the square raised bow. you can't see a casualty so easily and can't to a bow pick up. So choose the boat before you choose the engine and demand prop guards. A 5.4 searider gives 5 metres between bow and prop for recovery. A 5.6 adventure gives about 2.5metres.. which would u rather have the 5.6 as is a little drier for the coxswain as the searider is most dfinately a wet boat.. I'd take a searider any day. Flooding hulls make recovery easy.
I also have a jet boat that although has no prop, has no definite neutral stop position and is always edging ahead or astern.. not much good for MOB then.. A well trained child can be a better coxswain then an inexperienced adult. Incidentally I know a girl, a powerboat instructor, who on a course demonstrating how to do a MOB.. over ran the buoy she was using and 'killed/mammed' the dummy..luckily a practise, but unlikely she told me!! Women drivers beware! ha! I also do wake boarding etc.. and have no intention of putting my prop anywhere near the man in the water.
alex
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Old 12 May 2006, 15:43   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badbaws
I can 'park' a 30,000tonne ship next to a MOB dummy without sucking him through bow thrusts and main props.
MOB drills in a larger vessel is IMHO sometimes far more straightforward than in a typical rescue rib - the process takes longer to achieve but you have more time, less speed, better visibility, inclement weather has less of an impact (until latter stage of recovery), plenty of manpower at your disposal, are invariably twin screw and if you're driving a grey blanket and bean liner, bow thrusters make it a piece of piss.
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Old 12 May 2006, 19:20   #28
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What no-one has mentioned is the fact that although prop guards loose you speed and acceleration, they also greatly increase the time it takes to get a rope off your prop. That would be my main argument against fitting them on boat used for rescuing sailing dinghies.
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Old 12 May 2006, 19:31   #29
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Did my PB2 5 yrs ago or so and we used to Avon SR4's both with Yamaha 30hp's one had a prop guard the other didn't. At the time I had little experience with RIBs, but it soon became apparent less than an hour into the course that the one without the guard was noticebly faster -both onto the plane and at WOT. There was a race to get this boat after the lunch break! The instructers were cursing the prop guard and claimed it reduced fuel consumption as well.
Overall, it is clear the benefits of a prop guard it is whether a safety boat (usually below 50hp in most cases) can afford to loose the power. By the time you have a safety boat crew, their gear and a few race marks on board you are all ready feeling the weight. As I stated earlier and Badbaws ( a man of much experience) reiterated the key is in boat control and a suitable boat for the task in hand.
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