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Old 13 August 2012, 13:05   #1
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Suspected water in gear oil ?

Hi Guy's
I am new to all this as I have owned my rib now for only a short period of time and could do with some advice about my engine please.
The problem is that last weekend after a day out at sea I returned to base camp and as per normal attached my flush muffs to my Yam 25hp 2 stroke engine to begin the flushing process.
As the engine ran and the water flushing through I noticed milky coloured water coming from the prop.
After cleaning I took the gear box oil screw out to check the oil level and noticed that the oil was grey in colour, is this normal ? or is this a sign that water is getting into the oil ?
I know that there are oil seals in the prop area, but does anyone know how I can check them to see if they are in fact ok ?
Any advise would be great as I am new to it all and just starting out !
Thank you
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Old 13 August 2012, 13:23   #2
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Mine does this. comes out milky from the prop exhaust.
not a problem.

BUT grey oil is bad.
needs changing.

Change the Oil and take it out for a spin. then re check the oil.
drain it out and if it looks milky or small bubbles of stuff in it then its probably the prop shaft seals.

But get that oil changed sharpish :-)
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Old 13 August 2012, 15:22   #3
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Thanks for that advice, will do.
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Old 13 August 2012, 16:41   #4
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Removed the bottom plug and put a glass something under it, and let the first few seconds drain into the glass, then inspect it. ANY water means the seals are toast. If the oil looks like a coffee latte the seals are toast. Kits are cheap and they are pretty easy to replace with basic hand tools.

Either way you need to change the gear box fluid as it should be a very light tan color. If you don't have the necessary tools to change it go buy them as it is a simple service and will still be cheaper than paying someone to do the service including buying the tools. Also replace the o-rings/seals on the fill and drain plugs every time. (Call it cheap insurance.)
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Old 13 August 2012, 16:50   #5
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Remove the prop & check for fishing line around the propshaft.
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Old 13 August 2012, 17:36   #6
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I regularly have this problem on our boats at work as we share the lake with fishermen. After lots of expensive repair bills I regularly check each engine ever 4 weeks for fishing line wrapped around the prop shaft in front of the prop.

If left undetected it wraps tighter and tighter and gets drawn into the gearbox through the seals and let's water in and wrecks the oil. If its nylon line it can also melt due to friction, even under water, and be a real bugger to get off from what ever it sticks too.

Simple enough job to change the oil and shaft seals. If the milky oil smells a lot when drained you know it's been in there a while. Change the drain plugs seals while your at it at 50p each it's worth it even just for piece of mind. When you drain the oil look at in sunlight for signs microscopic metal particles which could be your gears Wearing due to the oil not functioning properly.

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Old 13 August 2012, 17:39   #7
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Invest in an oil pump with screw connector as well. A lot easier and cleaner than trying to squirt oil into the holes from the tubes it often comes in.

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