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Old 19 September 2004, 16:31   #11
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I know that Ravenspring's and Musto's etc. are breathable.
It is my impression that any decent drysuit IS breathable.
The ones that aren't are cheap drysuits and (some?) diving drysuits.
But as you make your selection, read the blurb and ask questions about breathability.
My advice would be:
1. Yes, make damm sure it's breathable
2. Get one with hard boots attached
3. And most important of all, make sure it is fitted with a "comfort zip".
4. Good manufacturers will tailor the suit to your requirements. I personally like extra "sealed" pockets here and there. Extra strength in the bottom, knees and elbows. And I have a reinforced padded midriff section to take the constant pounding from the steering wheel and which doubles as a hand-warmer.
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Old 19 September 2004, 20:20   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robin

The drysuit will keep you dry. You need to wear other layers beneath to stay warm. Thermals and fleeces or 'wooly bear' diving undersuits, things of that ilk.
Although the suit may be breathable you need to insure that what you wear underneath is also. I suspect a wooly bear will have the same water retention abilities as the hoover dam so you'll still end up wet underneath.

I bought a Ravanspring suit last year and so far very pleased with it.

Cheers

Mark
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Old 19 September 2004, 21:10   #13
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Us divers, know a bit about thermals, there are 2 makes that standout for me. I use weezle ... great undersuit expells moisture on to its outer surface so it can be breathed out of breathable drysuits. Their Web site is crap but the product is excellent:

http://www.weezle.co.uk/index.htm (See Tech Spec for description)

And these are also wonderful, however expensive and slightly kinky. These are base layers and so they are worn underneath other clothes or undersuit. However A mate of mine forgot his undersuit on a recent trip to Scapa Flow and dived in only these under his drysuit .. saying a lot for a man that does 45mins of stops!! On top of the dive thats a long time 100% submerged.

http://www.fourthelement.com/summer/technical/

These products are not cheap but well worth the money.
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Old 20 September 2004, 03:17   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian
My advice would be:
1. Yes, make damm sure it's breathable
2. Get one with hard boots attached
3. And most important of all, make sure it is fitted with a "comfort zip".
I agree 100% with Brian on this.

Drysuits are expensive, and compared with conventional waterproofs take a minute or two longer to put on and take off. Having a neck seal can take a bit of getting used to as well (but if it's sized correctly you'll not notice it after a few minutes).

However, whatever perceived disadvantages there may be, if you want to guarantee that you stay dry then you need a drysuit.

I started off with a "waterproof" flotation suit, because I didn't feel that I could afford a drysuit. It's certainly warm, and it's reasonably resistant to water, but it doesn't keep you dry like a drysuit does. With hindsight it was a mistake and I should have bought a drysuit straight off.

My next purchase was a non-breathable drysuit. If the price is right and you're not planning to be wearing it all day, then one of these is still better than a flotation suit for keeping you dry.

Finally I got a breathable drysuit. I've had it for five years and wouldn't go back to anything else.

John
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Old 20 September 2004, 03:39   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkWildey
Although the suit may be breathable you need to insure that what you wear underneath is also.


Mark
Mark you are absolutely right an oversight on my part, I have been mildly moist on occasion!!
Robin
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Old 20 September 2004, 03:49   #16
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Agree that a Drysuit plus thermals is the way to go for winter ribbing. The thermals are absolutely essential as the Ravenspring type (which I heartily recommend) have no intrinsic insulation themselves. In the winter I wear thermal long johns, fleece joggers and fleece uppers. As with all technical systems you should ideally wear manmade fibre only to aid "wicking" moisture away from your skin and out of the drysuit. Natural fibres - cotton etc - retain the moisture. That being said I usually wear a T shirt of some sort without any bother.

Disagree slightly with JK - Drysuits are no more expensive than a decent set of waterproofs - 300 or so. Thing is that most people buy both as there are times when you dont want the hassle of putting on the drysuit. Its usually those times that I immediately get a dollop of briny over my head and down my neck which makes we really wish I'd put my drysuit on!
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Old 20 September 2004, 04:38   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan
Disagree slightly with JK - Drysuits are no more expensive than a decent set of waterproofs - 300 or so.
And expensive waterproofs are expensive too!

Ribsters are likely to choose "waterproofs" (for want of a better term) for one of three reasons that I can think of:

1 They think they will keep them dry, or
2 They can't afford a drysuit, or
3 They just don't like drysuits

In case 1 they are wrong. If they have bought an expensive set of waterproofs, then they are likely to be disappointed.

In case 2 they may as well buy a cheap set of waterproofs and put the balance towards a dry suit.

In case 3 they will get wet, but it's their choice.

John
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Old 20 September 2004, 04:53   #18
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There is a 4th reason JK, and thats if you do other boating, particularly sailing you want to have a set of waterproofs as well!
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Old 20 September 2004, 05:02   #19
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Mullion is coming out with a breathable thermic flotation suit know.
You can`t make a breathable thermic suit because the thermic material is in the way of the outer waterproof layer.
Mullion solved this with using like pockets where air can come into the suit but water can`t come in.
Can definetly recoemend them.
Fladen is very baggy but Mullion is more cutted so they sit much more comftable to your body.
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Old 20 September 2004, 06:38   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan
There is a 4th reason JK, and thats if you do other boating, particularly sailing you want to have a set of waterproofs as well!
OK then:

4 They've already got waterproofs. See comments for 3

John
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