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Old 24 February 2010, 13:49   #1
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Steering controls position?

Hi,
I am going to put a steering position on my 4.5m boat.
I would to like to put it in the first third of the boat (the bow) to leave maximum space behind me and help with planing.
I was wondering if there is a reason not to, as all the boats I see seem to have it in the centre of the boat?
Cheers,
Geoff
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Old 24 February 2010, 15:37   #2
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Is it the SIB?
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Old 24 February 2010, 15:58   #3
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It is the SIB Chewy, but I posted it in here as there seems to be a lot more steering on ribs than sibs.
It will not be a proper jockey position or console, it is a "box" I've designed myself that is a column that will house a battery in its base.
It will bolt to the floor, I was thinking over the part where there is a hole to inflate the keel.
Do you think this is too far forward?
Cheers,
Geoff
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Old 24 February 2010, 16:03   #4
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Does your SIB do the whole bending thing when you go over waves etc?
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Old 24 February 2010, 16:12   #5
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Not too sure Chewy, I have not used this boat yet, and tend to only go out in flat calms.
I imagine with my weight at the front it won't be bending up much .
This is a picture.... http://rib.net/forum/attachment.php?...2&d=1247339387
The rear floor panel is bolted to the transom with two struts.
Cheers,
Geoff
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Old 24 February 2010, 16:21   #6
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The likes of Zodiac use a bar that runs across the boat from tube to tube which is usually pretty far forward.
Whats wrong with the tiller?
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Old 24 February 2010, 16:27   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chewy View Post
The likes of Zodiac use a bar that runs across the boat from tube to tube which is usually pretty far forward.
Whats wrong with the tiller?
I intend on going further afield with this boat and didn't enjoy being half turned all the time with my other boat.
Plus I was forever trying to get further forward with my other boat, to the point of holding the tiller extension with my finger tips to get on the plane.
I have the parts to convert and the full steering setup, just waiting for the steering mount to be made by a fabricator in stainless steel.
In the meantime was wondering about the position, so I don't drill holes in my floor too far forward if it won't work there.
Cheers,
Geoff
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Old 24 February 2010, 18:40   #8
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It won't be very comfortable right up in the bow.
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Old 25 February 2010, 11:15   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff_Jubb View Post
just waiting for the steering mount to be made by a fabricator in stainless steel.
Cheers,
Geoff
I found a sib like yours on an Austrian RIB-forum. Also with a steering stand. Not made in stainless steel though, but made from a dust bin. Lighter and perhaps cheaper? A creative mind is a joy forever.

http://www.schlauchboot-online.at/showthread.php?t=9488



Regards,
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Old 25 February 2010, 11:40   #10
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In rough water, the front of the boat gets the worst ride. I suppose you could make an argument that having controls there would make the ride in the rest of the boat at least a bit smoother, but it would be a weak one at best.

I think the reason most SIBs don't have remote steering is the space it takes up, which, in a small boat, is at a premium.

Balance and weighting aside, I prefer having the steering rearwards, as you can keep an eye on cargo and passengers (though this, too is kind of a weak argument for placement.) Forward also puts you away from the motor, which, while quieter, also makes fiddling with it to correct problems a bit harder.

These are just my opinions, though...

jky
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