Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 12 November 2006, 17:20   #21
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nos4r2 View Post
If you think you've got a problem you should see some of the racing boats coming out of Poole trying to keep to 10 knots. They trim in/out constantly til the prop is spraying water up in the air to keep the speed down. It sounds pretty good but I bet they go through a fair few impellers.

It's a damn good argument for having an auxiliary really-apart from the safety aspect of it.
That's my whole point. Some people just can't stick to 4kts without causing expensive damage to their boats. Something like a Sunseeker for example - unless you keep dropping in and out of gear which doesn't do you any good at all. Don't think an aux would help either - unless it's got a tiller steered 225.....

WHY walking pace anyway? So much depends on the kind of boat - a heavy displacement craft will just keep going when the power is cut - my RIB almost comes to a dead stop as soon as you chop the throttle.
__________________

__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 November 2006, 19:40   #22
Member
 
Cookee's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Salcombe, Devon, UK
Boat name: BananaShark
Make: BananaShark
Length: 10m +
Engine: 2xYanmar 260 diesels
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 4,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nos4r2 View Post
If you think you've got a problem you should see some of the racing boats coming out of Poole trying to keep to 10 knots. They trim in/out constantly til the prop is spraying water up in the air to keep the speed down. It sounds pretty good but I bet they go through a fair few impellers.

It's a damn good argument for having an auxiliary really-apart from the safety aspect of it.
I have no idea which race boats you've been watching, but if it was the class III and RIBs, then it's not like that at all - we run big pitch props and at 8 or 10 knots the boat is almost on the plane and the prop is slipping a fair bit - hence the noise and spray - no impellors would be harmed doing this!

Codprawn - I seriously doubt if you would get done for 6 knots in a 4 knot limit, but if that really is how fast you're going without the tide your tickover probably is a bit high!
__________________

__________________
Cookee
Originally Posted by Zippy
When a boat looks that good who needs tubes!!!
Cookee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 November 2006, 21:34   #23
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Tickover is only about 700rpm or so - it's the stupid 24" prop that's to blame!!!
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 November 2006, 23:32   #24
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: WhiteNoise/Dominator
Make: Ballistic 7.8/SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Opti 225/Yam 85
MMSI: 235090687/235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,645
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookee View Post
I have no idea which race boats you've been watching, but if it was the class III and RIBs, then it's not like that at all - we run big pitch props and at 8 or 10 knots the boat is almost on the plane and the prop is slipping a fair bit - hence the noise and spray - no impellors would be harmed doing this!
Thanks for that-I did wonder! I've only ever seen the odd one on the way out to practice and they've been behind me on the way out so couldn't see the engine too well but that's what it sounded like-I just assumed. Hell of a noise though and sounds REALLY sexy!
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 11:27   #25
ADS
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,410
The Christchurch harbour speed limit is only enforced at weekends and the odd week day during the summer, by the ex-bin men running the council patrol boat. There is no harbour authority and the speed limit is not enforced in the winter months, the navigation marks are also removed during the winter.
In the winter it is quite safe to travel up the harbour just on the plane and you will notice alot of the locals and the fishermen do just that. At the time of the offence (August 30th) I suspect that it was around fire work night/ annual regatta when there are alot of boats on the water and after the fireworks they all speed down the harbour. However, I very much doubt that it was the council patrol boat that booked him, more likely the Police RIB from Poole that attends such events. The council patrol boat quite honestly is a comedy act.
__________________
ADS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 12:39   #26
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Coventry
Make: Ribeye
Length: 5m +
Engine: Yamaha 115 4stroke
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADS View Post
In the winter it is quite safe to travel up the harbour just on the plane and you will notice alot of the locals and the fishermen do just that.
I quite agree, i've done it myself early morning/ dusk when you're the only boat about, but there is always the ' the rules don't apply to me ' who will do it regardless of circumstances and they are the ones who deserve what they get.

Rob C
__________________
Robox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 14:13   #27
Member
 
Powerboats's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Make: ZAR
Length: 9m +
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robox View Post
Sorry,
Totally disagree with you on this.I use Christchurch all the time and I have only seen the harbour patrol go for the ones taking the piss.If you use the harbour then you know that the channel is frequently crossed by windsurfers and inexperienced kids in dinghys . So stopping arseholes , of which there are a few in Christchurch, doing 20Knots in a 4 knot limit IS all about safety. If it was out of peak time then it is unlikely the patrol would have been there.

Rob C
Indeed, if it was the case that he was doing this speed, and endangering other users then he should have been booked, and a fine of £600 is more than acceptable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADS View Post
The council patrol boat quite honestly is a comedy act.
This is the beef behind my argument!!
__________________
Powerboats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 15:05   #28
Member
 
richardjawilson's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London, boat Dartmouth
Boat name: Lark
Make: Capelli Cap 32 WA
Length: 10m +
Engine: Yamaha 250x2
MMSI: 235096621
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 189
I am sure most of us would like to travel at a planing speed say of 12 knots as a minium 'safe' speed, but unfortuntely rules are rules and if its 4 knots then so be it.

richard
__________________
richardjawilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 20:08   #29
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: New Forest
Boat name: working on it
Make: Tornado
Length: 5.1
Engine: Yamaha 80
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 22
The trouble with enforcing marine speed limits is that the boat driver may be keeping absolutely at the correct limit through the water but the water, unlike a road, may also be moving in the same direction. Speed guns only measure the speed over the ground from a fixed position so our responsible boater will probably be 'speeding' with a sluicing tide under him.
I have never been sure if these limits are 'through the water' or 'over the ground'. I would welcome some guidance.

Robin
__________________
robineff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 November 2006, 20:21   #30
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Oakley
Boat name: Zerstörer
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki DF 140
MMSI: 235050131
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,931
Quote:
Originally Posted by robineff View Post
The trouble with enforcing marine speed limits is that the boat driver may be keeping absolutely at the correct limit through the water but the water, unlike a road, may also be moving in the same direction. Speed guns only measure the speed over the ground from a fixed position so our responsible boater will probably be 'speeding' with a sluicing tide under him.
I have never been sure if these limits are 'through the water' or 'over the ground'. I would welcome some guidance.

Robin
Robin,

You probably need no guidance.

I say this because with a decent lawyer you will get off. there are just too many variables as long as you don't go silly with the speed.

The radar gun needs to be calibrated and certified. Even then you could get a good lawyer to say that the movement of the detecting boat due to waves etc distorts figures. The operator needs to be qualified.
I have a feeling most of the courts that Marine infringemments are tried in are little more than Kangaroo courts and as such a decent Lawyer will soon earn his money.

And as for Yachties that dance up and down on their boats when a RIB goes past indicating you are going to fast, when your doing the harbour limit, then they really need to get a life and they need to go out in some rough stuff.

They are absolute saddos....
__________________

__________________
http://www.xfire.com/download/
Biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:26.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.