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Old 30 March 2014, 18:29   #21
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Originally Posted by stevedonna View Post
I wondered how many have done it on small ribs myself and how long it took
3 hrs there (to Alderney ) in fairly rough/confused sea - 2.5 hrs back in perfect conditions.
Definitely don't do it alone - 5 boats (all bigger) when I did it

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Old 31 March 2014, 03:55   #22
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People are saying "don't do it alone".
My question is, why not?

What is another rib or two going to do for you? Except get into trouble itself, either instead of you, or as well as you (runs out of fuel, night falls, crew get hypothermic etc)
If you breakdown, call the emergency services. Another small rib is unlikely to be able to tow you in those waters.
Although, I do agree the companionship factor is valuable in psychological terms.

These days I always go alone. If I get into trouble at least there is only one casualty.
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Old 31 March 2014, 04:34   #23
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Brian

I note from your profile that you have a 8m rib with 300 + hp. I suspect your rib may have a degree of shelter not afforded to smaller ribs as a result you ribs is more self sufficent than another

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Old 31 March 2014, 04:59   #24
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People are saying "don't do it alone". My question is, why not? What is another rib or two going to do for you? Except get into trouble itself, either instead of you, or as well as you (runs out of fuel, night falls, crew get hypothermic etc) If you breakdown, call the emergency services. Another small rib is unlikely to be able to tow you in those waters. Although, I do agree the companionship factor is valuable in psychological terms. These days I always go alone. If I get into trouble at least there is only one casualty.
My first thoughts were pretty lonely guy, then if thought stupid, I was going to leave it at that but thought don't be harsh and explain.
If you call the emergency service out over there they charge you big bucks, if you have no mates you can trust and rely on then I'll stick with lonely.

There are plenty of RIBnet stuff going on this year that you could tag along on, I haven't met one yet with your mind set of going alone, I think we are doing one or two this year why not come with us we promise not to talk to you unless you want us to or you get into trouble, they will help you whether you want it or not
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Old 31 March 2014, 05:36   #25
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My first thoughts were pretty lonely guy, then if thought stupid, I was going to leave it at that but thought don't be harsh and explain. If you call the emergency service out over there they charge you big bucks, if you have no mates you can trust and rely on then I'll stick with lonely. There are plenty of RIBnet stuff going on this year that you could tag along on, I haven't met one yet with your mind set of going alone, I think we are doing one or two this year why not come with us we promise not to talk to you unless you want us to or you get into trouble, they will help you whether you want it or not
I am quite at home in my own company and there are times when that is what I need . i have a couple of mates that are my walking mates and over the years we have learnt a lot about each other and a lot about ourselves . As long as you are a similar fitness and want the same risk/ challenge it is far better to do it in a small group .
there is a difference in my view from walking the dog over the fields for half a day to clear your head than setting off to do the penine way on your own .
some would do it on their own and get what they want from it but the vast majority do it in pairs or small groups for good reason .

I think the same probably applies to boating and I suspect going to Guernsey in A 4.8 is more leaning towards the. Penine way end than walking the dog .

we are all different I suppose .
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Old 31 March 2014, 08:59   #26
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Walking the hills are as far from boating as you could get old mate, the sea tends to level the playing field, it doesn't care if you're fit or not, you don't have to have a great deal of fitness to get to France, you will ache for sure, the biggest downfall is going unprepared, not so much you as the boat, get the boat sorted and you can get there with one leg, I know what you mean about own company but believe me don't do the channel on you're own unless you have to
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Old 31 March 2014, 10:03   #27
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3 hrs there (to Alderney ) in fairly rough/confused sea - 2.5 hrs back in perfect conditions.
Definitely don't do it alone - 5 boats (all bigger) when I did it

Thats our cheesy trailer, this is the proper video...

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Old 31 March 2014, 10:57   #28
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Thats our cheesy trailer, this is the proper video...

Thanks Whisper

Thought that was a bit short for such an epic intro...
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Old 31 March 2014, 11:32   #29
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Walking the hills are as far from boating as you could get old mate, the sea tends to level the playing field, it doesn't care if you're fit or not, you don't have to have a great deal of fitness to get to France, you will ache for sure, the biggest downfall is going unprepared, not so much you as the boat, get the boat sorted and you can get there with one leg, I know what you mean about own company but believe me don't do the channel on you're own unless you have to
I know they are different but the principal of doing something on your own or with other more experienced people is the same . There is no way on earth I would tackle that on my own without a shit load more experience and probably not then . Prefer to get there with someone so we can spend the night congratulating each other whilst having a beer .
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Old 31 March 2014, 11:54   #30
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Originally Posted by Brian View Post
People are saying "don't do it alone".
My question is, why not?

What is another rib or two going to do for you? Except get into trouble itself, either instead of you, or as well as you (runs out of fuel, night falls, crew get hypothermic etc)
If you breakdown, call the emergency services. Another small rib is unlikely to be able to tow you in those waters.
Although, I do agree the companionship factor is valuable in psychological terms.

These days I always go alone. If I get into trouble at least there is only one casualty.

Extracted from Brian's website....

Out of Fuel We were going from St. Vaast de la Hogue to Carentan on the eastern side of the Normandy peninsular, and then back again. An easy distance of some 24 miles or so, when I inexplicably (ahem) ran out of diesel. Of course it happened very suddenly, I wasn’t expecting it and the boat that was accompanying us, Ronnie, with my crew on board and who were leading, didn’t hear my calls over the VHF initially. To cap it all, we were in a rush to get back to the marina at St. Vaast before the tidal gate closed. We had some 10 minutes to go and after recognising an out-of-fuel situation, there was nothing left to do but drop anchor, turn on the nav. lights (a bright thought of mine), whistle up the other boat and leave Cyanide till the next tide, some couple of miles from the Iles-Saint-Mercouf. This was late afternoon. After dinner, around 10.30 and with the tidal gate now open, we went out again in another Scorpion, Jelignite, to look for Cyanide. It was pitch dark and Cyanide was nowhere to be seen. We went up and down the French coast looking for her and debated whether she had been found by a local fisherman and towed away. As she was worth £100k this seemed slightly more than a possibility. However after chasing various shore lights for hours and hours we decided to ask some French fishermen who were fishing some 10 miles offshore. On approaching them we noticed Cyanide floating freely on the current (offshore at the time!!), distinguishable by its nav. lights. Boarding her, we poured in the only fuel we had, some 5 litres and started the engine. So far so good. But we now had over 10miles to get back to St. Vaast and Cyanide would consume some 1.2 to 1.5 litres per mile. At normal cruising speed this wasn’t going to work. We considered towing, but this wouldn’t work either, as outside St. Vaast there is an area right by the entrance of small black buoys set in an array and designed to grow mussels on. We simply could not tow through this area. So, it was limp home time at around 5/6 knots carefully eaking out our fuel until we reached the buoyed area. Then we had to pick our way through with my crew holding a lamp over the front of the boat, picking up each buoy in the pitch dark and signalling me around it until we reached the marina at around 03.30 in the morning.
I never did get why I had run out of fuel. Sheer incompetence on my part I suppose.

Glad it all ended well.
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