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Old 16 July 2012, 04:26   #1
SR4
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Size doesn't matter, its what you do with that counts!

Well I must say I am used to helming a big boat with all the luxuries and comfort, but yesterday I had a full day armed with 50ltrs of fuel in my baby 4mtr Searider, well what an eye opener, all I can say is that it was FANTASTIC

I am still getting used to baby boats and their limitations, I am very safety conscious as well, but I must say I am extremely impressed with the handling on the Searider, it performed flawlessly in F5 gusting 6 yesterday in the Solent, it did take a lot of concentration, more not to get passengers wet, in order to slalom my way through the sea but a great first full day out

My only concern is what to do with all the lifejackets when going ashore, I stayed at marinas and left them in the office but something to think about for future escapades where I will be in a non marina environment, any ideas would be gratefully received bearing in mind it is a tiny boat.

So, for anyone wanting to get into boating I can thoroughly recommend small boats as long as you respect the elements, they are superb fun and don't need to cost a fortune (unless you are daft enough to bling one up ), but please do ensure you have the correct safety gear, the sea/water can be a dangerous place and needs respect
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Old 16 July 2012, 05:17   #2
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, it did take a lot of concentration, more not to get passengers wet,
You sure that was a searider you were driving????

Yep, with a bit of concentration, most sea states can be "ridden". Cool you had a fab day. Sound s abit more adventurous than my last outing down a canal!
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Old 16 July 2012, 05:29   #3
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As newbie I was amazed how the vessel seemed to stick to the water going down into the small troughs and then up again, I normally crash through the lot, this was a different kind of boating and got all the senses going, I loved every minute of it, the rougher the better for me (within reason), but I would have no qualms about going out in a full on F6 having seen it perform yesterday, just need to get to grips with the elephants trunk and practice that

I have been through some good F8's in the mothership, so much so that one time I was up at the helm passing Dover en route from Boulogne I had to resort to wearing my Gecko helmet because there was no way I would see where I was going, I was taking so much water over the bows, I have integral comms and was able to communicate with my wife below although she was not having as much fun as me Great time had by all

I witnessed the biggest and roughest seas of my life west of St Helena in the middle of the South Atlantic, certainly focuses the mind as you rise up absolutely mountainous waves and then crash down the other side, scary as fu.k really
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Old 16 July 2012, 07:37   #4
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Your trunk(s) I assume have a stoopid wee jam cleat on the transom? In which case if you are out in the lumpy stuff, just open them - the water you get in through them at rest will both dissappear quickly and be a minor inconvenience when compared to what they will subsequently loose when you are bouncing around.

Alternatively, do what I've done and lead the string forward so you can open / close them without leaving your seat!


As for waves - you were lucky. Go cruising with a bigger boat and I will guarantee one of you will be bouncing around while the other either skips from wave top to wave top or as you were, having a fun but smooth trip through the troughs. Go round the headland, the average wavelength shrinks by 0.5m and suddenly you have swapped places - you are now slamming into the back of every other wave, whilst the bigger boat that was slamming is now straddling the peaks.

Glad you got a decent first trip. You will be amazed what those wee SRs will do.
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Old 16 July 2012, 07:54   #5
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Thanks a lot, I really am just learning what these type of boats can do, mut say that even after a full day out a felt a little more 'connected' with the boat on the way back in if that makes sense Don't know how else to describe it, but it was starting to become a part of me, ffing hell am I turning into some soft tw@t now

Off out again Thursday for 11 days, so by the end we should be just about married
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Old 17 July 2012, 08:59   #6
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My only concern is what to do with all the lifejackets when going ashore, I stayed at marinas and left them in the office but something to think about for future escapades where I will be in a non marina environment, any ideas would be gratefully received bearing in mind it is a tiny boat.
How many of you are there? have you not got space for a couple of gas inflation jackets inside your console or seat? - then if you are worried you just need to add a lock. Realistically your fuel is probably much more 'attractive' to a thief though and you probably leave it lying on deck/locker unsecured.
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Old 17 July 2012, 09:03   #7
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No lockers, fuel canister under the seat, apart from a little open space under the consul but the rest open, may need to get some kind of locking dry bag I can chain to something to deter thieves, or walk around carrying the stuff
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Old 17 July 2012, 09:10   #8
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For short stops just leave lifejackets on the boat and the odds are you'll be OK. Unless you're in Newlyn, where they'd probably nick the boat anyway.

Overnight, put it all into a kit bag and take it with you. If you start locking up drybags then it's only going to make people think that you have stuff that's worth stealing.
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Old 17 July 2012, 09:23   #9
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Can you get locking caps for Quicksilver fuel tanks, I can't seem to find any But then again I guess they could take the whole canister Maybe best to mark it 'Holding Tank' or something
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