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Old 17 June 2008, 05:48   #21
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Originally Posted by jwalker View Post
Put yer cables above the deck. Tuck them under the tube a tie them off. Put the new deck down totally sealed with a bug in the well. No water inside the hull - ever. It may look a little less bling but you'll be safe in the knowledge that your hull will stay sound with no attention. Just look at all the stories on here where folk have water in hull problems - why risk it? Because it looks a bit prettier?


i am really surprised that you came up with that view. I would have thought that having under deck trunking is far superior to having cables etc above the deck being routed around the place and causing a hazzard as well as being more exposed to the elements or damage

if the trunking is done properly then you wont get water in the hull, unless there are holes in the trunking to allow water out of the trunks and into the hull.

I can not comment on humber or a porter hull being like a colander
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Old 17 June 2008, 05:49   #22
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Mark, see that vertical edge along the tube flange, why don't you box it and route the services inside. They can swing out at the transom and be led neatly to the engine rather than sprouting out of the hull in all directions like an ungainly plant.
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Old 17 June 2008, 06:02   #23
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I would have thought that having under deck trunking is far superior to having cables etc above the deck being routed around the place and causing a hazzard as well as being more exposed to the elements or damage..
I wasn't suggesting they be, 'routed around the place and causing a hazard'. It's quite possible to bring them out of the console through a tube pointing in the right direction for them to lay neatly under the boat's tube. They can be clipped into place and they bend tidily against the transom where they lead conveniently to the fuel filter and engine. The only ones which need to protrude a bit are the stiffer control cables. If necessary, cable protection is easily arranged. As I said, it aint what you do, it's the way that you do it.
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Old 17 June 2008, 06:07   #24
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For the fuel connection hydraulic bulkhead fittings in stainless + doughty seals with a couple of large washers glassed on to either side of the bulk head to give them something to lock up to. Or just a stainless socket welded to a plate and glassed in
Ah, now you are taking quality installation. What we have here is (and always be) a BWM (Better off Walking Mate). All I have is a bit of rubber hose and a spigot on the tank. A Jubilee clip was considered extravagent. You can just see it in the first picture above.
I was jus going to make sure the hose meets fresh air well above any water level this side of being sunk.
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Old 17 June 2008, 06:17   #25
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Mark, see that vertical edge along the tube flange, why don't you box it and route the services inside. They can swing out at the transom and be led neatly to the engine rather than sprouting out of the hull in all directions like an ungainly plant.
A cunning plan indeed. I could even use the other side of the flange where there is a 120mm shelf under the tube. A little bit of protection to stop chafing the tube and we might be in business.
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Old 17 June 2008, 06:27   #26
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Ah, now you are taking quality installation. What we have here is (and always be) a BWM (Better off Walking Mate). All I have is a bit of rubber hose and a spigot on the tank. A Jubilee clip was considered extravagent. You can just see it in the first picture above.
I was jus going to make sure the hose meets fresh air well above any water level this side of being sunk.
The plate and socket is the budget version
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Old 19 June 2008, 06:13   #27
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A solution pehaps?

I was looking at a mates Ribtec 655 yesterday, and I may have an answer.

He has a bit of rectangular trunking (extractor duct) on the underside of the deck from the front face of the well to under the console. It is sealed at both ends, so the inside of the duct is "outside" and it never opens into the bilge. As the deck is lower at the stern than the console, the water level in the well/on deck is always lower than the floor in the console. A pump in the well keeps the outboard end dry mosy of the time. The only time that I can see it being lower is if you are going down a big wave with a dead pump.

Any 655 owners out there got any comments?
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Old 19 June 2008, 06:20   #28
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Any 655 owners out there got any comments?
Fitted out a Ribtec 535 with the same system, only they didn't mark were the underdeck trunk ended so had to guess where I put the hole cutter to access it It does work but the Ribtec ones didn't have much space and it's a tight bend if your using cable steering.

Pete
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Old 19 June 2008, 07:02   #29
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It does work but the Ribtec ones didn't have much space and it's a tight bend if your using cable steering.Pete
Cable steering? You want me to bin my SeaStar?

Cunning plan in hand for engine control bends.
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/FD56400.html
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Old 19 June 2008, 07:27   #30
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My trunk ends above the deck at both ends, the worst that can happen is that the trunk gets full of water as it isn't possible for the trunk to flood the hull. The external connector at the transom is about 3 inches above deck level topped by a "hat".
On a small boat I did find the above deck cables such a pain that I wanted rid of them even having done them in the way JW suggests. It was the obvious way to do them in any case. The picture shows how much room it took up on what was a very small boat for diving.
They still needed to get across to the tubes and the loom always got in my way.
Humbers always have a little water in the hull in my experience after use, every one I have every used or owned always had a small amount inside from various sources.
Once main source I found was with anchor well, this drains to the hull and then out into the well so each day you use it any wet rope or hatch leakage has to run down the length of the hull to drain when the plugs are taken out.
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