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Old 25 March 2006, 19:58   #11
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If you look on a few climbing webbsites i'm sure you'll find an explanation of how the "mystical unlocking" occurs. I'll see if i can find one tommorrow when i'm awake...
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Old 26 March 2006, 04:30   #12
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Mystical unlocking?

The one I referenced unlocks by having a collar that extends from the gate over the nose of the opening. By rotating the collar a quarter turn, you line up a slot with the nose, and the gate opens.

Other "locking" carabiners are similar, but you usually have to either pull down on the collar (no slot) or screw it back along the gate (again, no slot.)

There are a few other similar things I've seen (primarily intended for sailing safety harnesses, I think) that have some weird squeeze-to-unlock mechanism, but these things also run $40 to $85; a lot more than the $15-20 that the climbing biners run.

I should have mentioned that a good deal of fresh water rinses and silicone lube is called for with aluminum biners. And, you should plan on replacing them every year or two, as the springs seem to go away after a bit anyway. Most are anodized, so the main corrosion points are drilled spots and places that trap salt water (which means its more salt build up than corrosion, I suppose.)

The SS ones seem to not need any special care (and last a lot longer than the aluminum ones.)

jky
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Old 26 March 2006, 06:25   #13
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When mine's on her mooring, I use a "squeeze to unlock" safety snap hook like this one:
http://www.mailspeedmarine.com/Produ...b-bd5347b61c07
It's tied on the bight to the mooring line about 2 metres down from the bouy, with the bight whipped for good measure. I moor by clipping the snap hook to the external stem eye, then take the 2m bouy line inboard jamming the line in the Valiant's jam cleat and then passing the painter through the bouy's handle and tying it off. Belt and braces, I know, but it means I sleep at night when the wind gets up!

Jim
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Old 26 March 2006, 06:46   #14
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The carabiners I will be getting will be 8mm or 10mm stainless ones, doesn't seem a good idea to economise on something that could cost a lot more if it broke! One of the ones I was looking at I think had a breaking strain of 4200kg which ought to hold on to a 500kg RIB. I believe in overkill though

I see what is meant now - how they might unlock if twisted against something like a tube - but where I am intending to use them, this can't happen as far as I can see. I think I am going to end up using short "slave lines" on the boat and others which will stay attached to the pontoon, in the place I will be probably keeping it long-term there won't be anything else invading my space so I can do that. It will mean the quick-release fittings will be in free space and always under some sort of tension so should be safe enough I hope.
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Old 26 March 2006, 14:03   #15
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I use the screwgate type. (See picture below)

How would this come undone??

I know the basic ones (pic below) can come undone by turning on thereself and then having a load applied.

The process of how they come undone is illustrated in some of the RYA practical course notes.

Chris
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Old 27 March 2006, 03:34   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BogMonster
Scratching my head at the moment as to the most secure means of attaching lines to stuff so that they can be easily removed without faffing around with knots and stuff...Any thoughts or advice please?
Hi Stephen,

For peace of mind, KISS. A knot is easy to do and over the centuries has proved to be pretty reliable. Take your line around the fixture and bring it back to the boat. Bowline or Round turn + 2 half hitches is the sure way to go. I lost a boat after the snap shackle holding the painter to the bow (hard boat!) sprung itself. Never leave the boat unattended relying on a quick release clip.

Love the pics by the way.

Tim'mers.
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Old 27 March 2006, 05:29   #17
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Originally Posted by Swifty
For peace of mind, KISS. A knot is easy to do and over the centuries has proved to be pretty reliable.
Tim'mers.
True, fair point...

I am using two lines on both bow and stern at the moment, and will be keeping it that way as I am paranoid about losing it! One to the outer loop on the fibreglass bit of the bow, and one to the point on the tube, and on the stern, double lines back to the point on the tube and then tied back to the A frame "just in case" (decent lashing eye on the transom still to be fitted). It was bouncing like hell again last night but still there on the way to work this morning (can't find a "phew mops sweaty brow" smiley ). We seem to have had a month's worth of NNE wind in the last five days - typical somebody needs to tell the Met Office that the prevailing winds here are supposed to be westerly!!

I guess the best answer is to have one quick-release line on each end for clunk-click mooring, and one properly attached one to use as backup when leaving the boat. I think that is what I will be doing, next time I take it out of the water. Not gonna try and splice a line on to the outer ring while leaning over the bow though - it would be just asking for a big splash and some swearing I think I'll do that bit on dry land...

Thanks for all the replies
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