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Old 02 July 2004, 07:46   #21
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Yeh, probably.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Kennett
About the same time that the Eurocommuter does!

John
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Old 02 July 2004, 08:52   #22
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You should only go out into seas that you are and your boat are capable of handling. You will almost certainly give up before the boat does. One thing to remember when heading into rough seas is that you must keep the power on so as not to stall the engine by water flowing back up the exhaust when landing back in the water. When following seas then maintain speed faster than the wave to prevent you from being swampt. Also remember to trim the engine out so as to lift the bow preventing you from stuffing.

May I suggest you read Paul Glatzels article on rough water handling and take some RYA powerboat courses if you intend to venture into these seas.
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Old 02 July 2004, 08:56   #23
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[QUOTE=Simon Hawkins] You should only go out into seas that you are and your boat are capable of handling. .

And at what point do you know what you and your boat are capable of handling if you do not go out in different conditions? Alan P
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Old 02 July 2004, 09:08   #24
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[QUOTE=Alan Priddy]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
You should only go out into seas that you are and your boat are capable of handling. .

And at what point do you know what you and your boat are capable of handling if you do not go out in different conditions? Alan P

So very true!

I have done quite a bit of mountain climbing and there is only ONE thing that counts - experience! You can have all the bits of paper in the world but they mean so little compared to doing it for real. There is far too much emphasis these days on bits of paper!

I am always puzzled as to why people have to go on a course to learn this or that when they could learn from experience instead - all of the worlds best climbers are self taught - it comes down to instinct I suppose.

Either that or I am just too bloody minded to be taught anything!
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Old 02 July 2004, 09:15   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
I am always puzzled as to why people have to go on a course to learn this or that when they could learn from experience instead
There's a very good reason for doing that - learn specific techniques from experienced people. Then get more experience of your own, having "jump started".
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- all of the worlds best climbers are self taught - it comes down to instinct I suppose.
Totally different situation - you can't teach climbing (I assume you mean technical rock climbing?) I've known some people start climbing at E2, whereas I started at VS, and some people struggle to start at Vdiff.
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Old 02 July 2004, 09:17   #26
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I totally agree you cannot beat experience and I have learnt rough water handling in that very way. However a course is a good place to start to get the basics and principles of the task at hand.
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Old 02 July 2004, 10:44   #27
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Crossing sea

What is the best position for the engine to be in during a crossing sea as far as Trim is concerned?
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Old 02 July 2004, 13:08   #28
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Totally different situation - you can't teach climbing (I assume you mean technical rock climbing?) I've known some people start climbing at E2, whereas I started at VS, and some people struggle to start at Vdiff. [/QUOTE]

I know that and so do you but doesn't stop loads of places trying!

Not too good on rock myself - bit too big for that - but show me an ice wall...........
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