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Old 04 July 2007, 11:57   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vince View Post
On the subject of someone being ejected from the boat, we always appoint a lookout. If it happens on our boat, then that person has the sole job of keeping an arm pointing in the direction of the subject in the water. It means the driver can concentrate on the mob recovery, and he knows where the person is in the water at all times.
This was taught to us during our PB2 as well. It allows the skipper to control the boat and not have to worry about the Mob position.

We went out for our first trip last weekend and it was really rough (for me) over the Chichester bar. The interesting thing is that as Skipper, the biggest problem I had was that my husband was sitting in the suicide seat which
1) blocked my vision - couldn't see another boat which was really close, and
2) I was really nervous as the waves were really big and there is no where to really hold on.

I have learnt that nobody sits up front unless at anchor or going really slowly - but even then as it is clear the wash of another boat can cause chaos.

When we bought the boat, the previous owner didn't have a spare killcord - his argument was that if he fell overboard, he didn't want a novice to come and rescue him and possibly hit him. I can see his argument but having seen how quickly distance and visibility can be lost, this isn't the answer.

I have two full sets of keys and kill cord. Before setting off on Saturday, I explained where the keys were - very easy at hand.

Having said that, in the big waves - the new killcord was very tight and short and I managed to kill the engine, by standing up - which didn't improve the nerves either!!!!

I don't think Genoa has anything to feel bad about - thank you for sharing and I agree that your thread is more important than the Virgin -
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Old 04 July 2007, 12:00   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vince View Post
On the subject of someone being ejected from the boat, we always appoint a lookout. If it happens on our boat, then that person has the sole job of keeping an arm pointing in the direction of the subject in the water. It means the driver can concentrate on the mob recovery, and he knows where the person is in the water at all times.
I am not sure that goes far enough. Everyone on board should have the job of being lookout. and if they spot a MOB, they should keep eyes fixed and pointing at the casualty. This is what I tell my crew in safety briefings. The chances of your one appointed lookout seeing the MOB go over, or finding them quickly when someone else shouts MOB have to be lower than the chances of the original "spotter" keeping track of them.
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Old 04 July 2007, 13:25   #33
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As a yachtmaster instructor I teach the same. At the shout of man overboard get someone to watch them. In a yacht travelling at speed you can be 100m away and still have no way of slowing - with a spinnaker up (thats the big colourful one up front) it can take minutes to get the boat stopped let alone think about returning.

However, what this taught me was real life is not an exercise. That was my 10 year old, not a bucket and fender!! I could not take my eyes off her after seeing her thrown like a rag doll, was she ok, did her lifejacket do the job etc etc. Don't think you'll be any different when it happens for real, to your nearest and dearest.
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Old 04 July 2007, 13:52   #34
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Sarah there is no harm in people sitting up front IF the conditions allow it and the helm keeps a good watch at all times.
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Old 04 July 2007, 13:52   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genoa View Post
As a yachtmaster instructor I teach the same. At the shout of man overboard get someone to watch them. In a yacht travelling at speed you can be 100m away and still have no way of slowing - with a spinnaker up (thats the big colourful one up front) it can take minutes to get the boat stopped let alone think about returning.
Agreed, I've done MOB driills on tallships (square sails, pirate ship type things), spot the MOB, throw over lifejackets, rings etc at an interval for following back whilst rib launched, spotters up the masts etc, and the rib still has trouble finding the casualty. It's also amazing how difficult it is to spot a MOB with just small waves, even from high up on a tall ship mast!
Luckily, in a RIB it should never take so long, and turning for the pick up is much quicker.
Definitely something I hope won't happen to me.
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Old 04 July 2007, 14:01   #36
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Interesting, and just proves that you can never be prepared for the unexpected....

Travelling right up in the bow is very exhilarating but I must admit I have always been conscious of the possibility of going over and underneath the boat is anything happened - it's only ever been done on a flat calm day (not that common here!) and there isn't a lot of other traffic.

Also interesting to see how to do dual killcords - must remember that one...
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Old 04 July 2007, 14:10   #37
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Also interesting to see how to do dual killcords - must remember that one...
It is, but don't think it will work on my Evinrude, so may have to go down the route of another kill switch mounted to the console for the 'instructing' co-pilot. But i guess then you need 2 spares in case both helm and co-pilot go in, so the remaining passengers can start up again? Presumably, if both are ripped out, and there is only one spare, the engine can't be started?
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Old 04 July 2007, 14:29   #38
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Originally Posted by Neil Harvey View Post
It is, but don't think it will work on my Evinrude, so may have to go down the route of another kill switch mounted to the console for the 'instructing' co-pilot. But i guess then you need 2 spares in case both helm and co-pilot go in, so the remaining passengers can start up again? Presumably, if both are ripped out, and there is only one spare, the engine can't be started?
I'm pretty sure that most newer kill switches allow you to restart the engine once without the kill cord after it has been activated for this very reason.
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Old 04 July 2007, 14:32   #39
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I'm pretty sure that most newer kill switches allow you to restart the engine once without the kill cord after it has been activated for this very reason.
will have to check - thanks
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Old 04 July 2007, 14:34   #40
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Originally Posted by Neil Harvey View Post
will have to check - thanks
To be honest I haven't tried on my own boat yet (Yamaha) either but I recently saw an instructor demo it on his Evinrude. He said it's a recent thing. Its definitely worth checking!

My previous boat had a flick switch type which was easy enough to reset without a chord!
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