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Old 04 July 2007, 05:15   #21
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Great Post

Thank you - this is a real cautionary tale for all of us and I'm happy to contribute my .02.

I keep the killcord attached to me with newbies on the helm and always sit on the tubes to have access to the throttle and trim - even if I get a wet ass!
No-one rides in the bow above displacement, both because of the amplified pitch effects up there and the risk of going over the bow and down the keel rather than off to either side.
I'm not convinced slowing right down is a good idea. I've had the experience of crashing off the first wake wave into the front of the steep second one trying that approach. At best very, very wet and potentially burst tubes. This is a difficult call and IMHO comes down to the distance between and steepness of the wake waves vs the length of your boat. If they're close you're better planing through while with a shorter boat and spaced out wake waves it's safer to go over slowly to allow the boat ride up the second one. Unfortunately from the Rib it's almost impossible to assess this as you approach so turning away is probably the only safe/dry option!

Finally I'd just like to suggest that, unless you have a Mariner/Mercury kill switch, you double check that the spare kill-cord clip is present and that whomever you're hoping will come retreive you knows where it is and how to use it!
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Old 04 July 2007, 07:01   #22
J S
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When i did my powerboat Instructors course we were first of all told to sit beside the throttle controls so if there was a problem it would be easy for you to sort it out immediately. We were also told that if we were running a child's powerboat level 1 or we had someone very nervous onboard we sould wear a killcord as well as the student at the helm and it would be connected in a way in which if either the instructor or the student fell out it would not take them both.

Below is an extract from wavelength an instructors newletter which shows how the kill cord should be connected.



Hope this is of some help to people.

James
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Old 04 July 2007, 08:02   #23
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Genoa,

Did the Gin Palace notice what happened and try to help?

I know it's not strictly speaking his problem that you drove into his wake but on a wider point should a skipper turn around if he sees a boat get in difficulties in his wake?
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Old 04 July 2007, 08:19   #24
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We had a bad experience when we were in our 3.1m SIB on the river/estuary at Pembroke. It isn't exactly a big boat and it was our first time out. I know I should have been keeping a better all around look but we were doing about 22kts so I wasn't paying that much attention behind us.

A large powerboat - something like a 37' Fairline Targe or similar - overtook us at about 40kts - he then carved a turn right across our path to get into the marina. The wake was massive - especially from a 3.1m SIB - I turned into it head on and slowed right down and we were ok but it could have been very different. Why the hell he couldn't have turned behind us is beyond me. Should have taken the boat's name.
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Old 04 July 2007, 08:35   #25
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just quickly read this thread and unless i missed it im surprised nobody mentioned going through a wake at an angle,not head on or completely side on,its much more comfortable and you can normally keep your speed up
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Old 04 July 2007, 09:04   #26
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just quickly read this thread and unless i missed it im surprised nobody mentioned going through a wake at an angle,not head on or completely side on,its much more comfortable and you can normally keep your speed up
I think the problem with this is if it's a really big wake you could get turned side on and swamped! The idea of tackling it head on is so there is no sideways turning forces on the boat.
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Old 04 July 2007, 09:14   #27
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Genoa,

Did the Gin Palace notice what happened and try to help?
To be honest, I have no idea!
It was my 10 year old daughter in the water. I was focused on where she was and condition whilst installing myself in driving position by feel. I didn't take my eye of her!

As is often the case, the best help from her would have been to hove to at a reasonable distance and call for help if required. - I have never seen a GP do man over board drill (what do they do? ?) The only bit that you could possibly get onto is that platform over their props and I don't see how they could get hold of you far enough away from those and drag you around...
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Old 04 July 2007, 09:17   #28
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Originally Posted by J S View Post
Below is an extract from wavelength an instructors newletter which shows how the kill cord should be connected.


Hope this is of some help to people.

James

This is great!!
I appreciate it is an excerpt from on instructors newsletter, but this is the sort of really useful content/ideas that we less experieinced ribsters could really do with. Lets have more in more threads!!
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Old 04 July 2007, 09:29   #29
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I often have friends or the kids helming, and I find the most worrying aspect is not having control of the throttle (which is located on the outside of the consol and difficult to reach). On my next boat I'm planning to have dual pod seats and the throttle centre mounted so that it is easy to assist or takeover engine control if needed. Would also mean that the kill switch could be located centrally and I could remain attached to it!
We didnt have the option of the centre throttle, but what we did do was to retro fit a kill switch in the middle of the console near the bottom, so that it can be attached to somebody experienced! You dont have much chance of reaching the throttle if you have to lean right over.
On the subject of someone being ejected from the boat, we always appoint a lookout. If it happens on our boat, then that person has the sole job of keeping an arm pointing in the direction of the subject in the water. It means the driver can concentrate on the mob recovery, and he knows where the person is in the water at all times.
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Old 04 July 2007, 11:57   #30
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Quote:
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Genoa,

Did the Gin Palace notice what happened and try to help?

I know it's not strictly speaking his problem that you drove into his wake but on a wider point should a skipper turn around if he sees a boat get in difficulties in his wake?
Although it's not his problem, I honestly believe that we have a duty to stop and help anyone we see in danger etc whilst out on the water. If you realise that is.
cahnces are, he would not have noticed what was happening behind him, especially in a Gin Palace.
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