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Old 28 October 2013, 17:19   #21
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I took my course last month. Sadly, the school insist they've sent the paperwork off, but the RYA insist they haven't received it! Hope this doesn't mean I end up having to sit the new format tests in the new year...!
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Old 28 October 2013, 17:28   #22
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The length of this course is one day in the Netherlands. Guess RYA decides the duration not the EU.
Hi Snakedoctor

Welcome to RIBnet

Maybe you want to read the following document and review your post

HARMONISED CEPT TRAINING PROCEDURES FOR THE SHORT RANGE CERTIFICATE (SRC) FOR GMDSS non-SOLAS VESSELS.

In particular paragaph 2.1: Course instruction time may be accomplished by self-study, formal training, or a combination of these and total study time is reccommended to be at least 10 hours.
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Old 28 October 2013, 17:42   #23
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The RYA is not to blame for this one - indeed they have kept it simple for years .

The reason for the changes are that a number of the EU countries donít accept the UK SRC as it currently does not comply with European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) requirements for course length and examination.
The SRC here has been two days for a long time. You cover a lot of theory and SAR related stuff as well as the basics and some practical stuff. They're not teaching you how to use a VHF, they're training you to be part of a global network
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Old 28 October 2013, 18:21   #24
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The SRC here has been two days for a long time. You cover a lot of theory and SAR related stuff as well as the basics and some practical stuff. They're not teaching you how to use a VHF, they're training you to be part of a global network
I'd say most people don't want to be "part of a global network" they want to be able to communicate legally, with confidence, when the need arises. I fail to see what logic says 10 hours is the minimum to operate a push to talk button, send a mayday / panpan etc understand what channels to use / not use and theoretically learn basic VP. Isn't that what the real need is?
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Old 28 October 2013, 18:34   #25
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I fail to see what logic says 10 hours is the minimum to operate a push to talk button, send a mayday / panpan etc understand what channels to use / not use and theoretically learn basic VP. Isn't that what the real need is?
Maybe if you'd done the full two day course, you'd have a better appreciation of it's value...

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Old 28 October 2013, 18:40   #26
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Clearly there are people with very different abilities and not ALL pay scant regard to there knowledge and or ability. Only saturday I had on a SRC course 2 very well educated people, both Dr's ... Their end of course feedback form comments were :
A great day, learnt a lot and I am leaving with a far greater Knowledge and very much more confident in the use of radio... One also commented a longer time using the radio would have been nice.......They usually have around 3.5 - 4 hrs !!!!
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Old 28 October 2013, 18:47   #27
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I'd say most people don't want to be "part of a global network"
No-one wants to be part of it. Its not like facebook - you don't choose to be part of it - if you transmit on the network you MUST be part of it. But if my life depends on someone receiving my mayday via a relay station I'd be kind of hopeful that the relay station was trained to be part of that global network rather than a Sunday boater who didn't bother learning what he was doing. Its not quite as simple as re-tweeting!

Likewise I'd prefer that I don't get overspoken either by a well meaning 'relayer' or by someone who didn't think they needed to listen to 16 before pressing the PTT
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Old 28 October 2013, 19:28   #28
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Originally Posted by lakelandterrier View Post
I'd say most people don't want to be "part of a global network" they want to be able to communicate legally, with confidence, when the need arises. I fail to see what logic says 10 hours is the minimum to operate a push to talk button, send a mayday / panpan etc understand what channels to use / not use and theoretically learn basic VP. Isn't that what the real need is?
Actually my biggest criticism of the (existing) training was that it focussed far too much on the stuff you mention and not enough on the 'value' that VHF could bring to my everyday boating.

I wonder if anyone will use the 1.5 days VHF and add in another 0.5 day of wider "safety" stuff? Many people don't have a liferaft, and aren't planning long offshore cruises so the full sea survival course might be overkill but added to the VHF course you could cover a wider range of safety stuff that would be useful to many.
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Old 29 October 2013, 12:52   #29
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Actually not enough on the 'value' that VHF could bring to my everyday boating.
??? How many "radio checks" does one man need?
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Old 29 October 2013, 18:45   #30
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??? How many "radio checks" does one man need?
radio checks WERE covered on the course, can't say it was a particular highlight of the course!

Here are some of the features of modern VHF/DSC that I'd like to have been covered. I did ask the instructor but other than acknowledging that "some radios have those capabilities" he didn't seem to know:

- position polling: one of the more common routine radio calls between vessels is to try and meet up / find each other. Position polling can help.

- group calling: again potentially useful for coordinating "flotillas". Nobody could tell me if it was a good idea (or not) to put all the UK CG's in one group and group call them rather than worrying about which was the closest station - especially since I frequently boat near a boundary (Belfast - Stornoway).

In addition we didn't spend any appreciable time on possibly the most common call that people will make to the CG - reporting in with passage plans. So whilst I can tell you exactly what the CG expect to hear in a distress or urgency situation - I still don't really know the expected format of a good 'transit report'.

I realise quality varies with instructor but the emphasis was very much on its distress use (which is only emphasises by all the other GMDSS stuff like EPIRBs that is covered). I expected some guidance on when I should be calling VTS and what I might expect to tell them (or hear on a listening watch that might be useful).

In addition I think some of my cohort may have benefited from actually plotting the positions that they "overheard" on their simulated calls, and from going from a chart position to distress call rather than a set of coordinates.

I think probably more could have been made of VHF weather forecasts and subfax (or is it subfacts?) broadcasts which are routinely made. Yes they are common sense but I'd hazard a guess that >1/2 the people on my course didn't really understand them.
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