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Old 21 August 2009, 11:52   #11
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I've been caught out a few times now. First time was due to lack of prep for the day and thinking 'weather looks ok', second was due to the weather not doing what the forecast had told it to do.

I had to stay at displacement speed allot as like you, speeds just getting on to the plane where to much. Now a more experienced helm may have been able to go faster than me but I felt more in control and I'm more experienced using the boat like a displacement hull.

There was a thread recently about rough weather training. I'd love to go on such a practical course.
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Old 21 August 2009, 13:02   #12
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An interesting read.......

If you were traversing some large stuff, is there a risk of being tipped over?
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Old 21 August 2009, 13:12   #13
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An interesting read.......

If you were traversing some large stuff, is there a risk of being tipped over?
as i said earlier ,about running down a wave too fast , then broaching to as the bow digs in and the wave pushes the stern around and over you go ,or you pitch pole straight over ,,going into a large set of steep waves a lot depends then on how close the next wave is coming at you after you have climbed it ,,and weather you are going to land in the trough or on the next wave ,,,,,,i supposeone of the worst is if you are close to a sea wall and you have reflective back waves hitting oncoming waves causing confused seas thats going to cause problems if close to a harbour wall when trying to reach shelter ,,every location has its own local conditions and problems and as SPR said earlier its local experience as much as anything .,,,even the advise of ,with a r.i.b.or inflatable boat take the oncomming wave on a slight angle rather that straight on has its limitations in certain conditions ,,,,the run along pararell for a bit then turn into waves can be used if the waves are far apart enough ,
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Old 21 August 2009, 15:54   #14
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its much better being on shore whishing you were out at sea ,than being out at sea whishing you were back on shore ,
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Old 21 August 2009, 16:14   #15
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An interesting read.......

If you were traversing some large stuff, is there a risk of being tipped over?
It's not quite that simple. You can cope with large waves relatively comfortably if the distance between them is great enough and you have a big enough boat. It's when the wavelength shortens and the angle of slope becomes steeper that large waves become more of a problem, and the problem comes to the smaller boats first. Generally speaking, size does matter here

The biggest problem comes from breaking waves. As the wave breaks it releases considerable amounts of energy. As a very simple rule of thumb, if a breaking wave has a height about the same as the beam of your boat it is more than capable of rolling you over. Even big boats get knocked down by breaking waves.

There is a bit of a foolish myth amongst some people that RIBs have such fantastic seakeeping abilities that you can do anything you like. Obviously that is not true - failing to respect the sea always leads to problems in the long run.

There is a lot of good advice on this forum, but the best advice is just not to be there ... especially to keep away from breaking water.
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Old 21 August 2009, 16:25   #16
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The RIB I was on the other day went through alot of breaking surf over and over again and it never caused us any trouble.
I think you need to know your limits and gain experience at rough weather handling.
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Old 21 August 2009, 16:26   #17
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the best advice is just not to be there ... especially to keep away from breaking water.
I hear that loud and clear.
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Old 21 August 2009, 16:51   #18
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The RIB I was on the other day went through alot of breaking surf over and over again and it never caused us any trouble.
I think you need to know your limits and gain experience at rough weather handling.
there is a big difference though from using a boat designed principley for rough water use ,eg ,no transom ,top condition and maintainence , a well trained crew and all the immersion proof engines and the self righting capibilitys ,going to a basic 5 metre off the peg rib and engine with a fairweather sailer and his wife and kids hanging on for dear life dressed in shorts and t shirts when caught out in a squall ,lol
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Old 21 August 2009, 17:12   #19
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There is a bit of a foolish myth amongst some people that RIBs have such fantastic seakeeping abilities that you can do anything you like.
Another way of putting it, RIBs have such fantastic sea abilities that they can do most things - In the right hands.

Someone think of a way to predict the weather and start rough weather training and I'll be first in the cue
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Old 22 August 2009, 01:29   #20
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there is a big difference though from using a boat designed principley for rough water use ,eg ,no transom ,top condition and maintainence , a well trained crew and all the immersion proof engines and the self righting capibilitys ,going to a basic 5 metre off the peg rib and engine with a fairweather sailer and his wife and kids hanging on for dear life dressed in shorts and t shirts when caught out in a squall ,lol
Very true. I think most RIBs can take more than their owners can though.
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