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Old 08 April 2013, 14:19   #1
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Rope lengths

Hi guys as this is my first season with a rib I am unsure about rope lengths required for general mooring use I have all of my old ropes for the riggers to alter so have lots of rope to play with but the setup I have I'd designed to set up a 7 m powerboat on springs including a short single handed mid ships tie off at the helm. Do you tie a rib up on springs ? I have two cleats on the a frame either side and the front cleat next to the anchor roller looking around the marina a rope attached to the front winch eye seems to be quite common.
Any help on a good assortment of rope lengths would be appreciated the rib is 6m
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Old 08 April 2013, 14:56   #2
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I'd probably stick to what you have and see how it suits. The difference between "7m powerboat" and "6m rib" is not going to be massive. The ropes you need for marina's and would be quite different to those for tidal harbours etc.

Yes you can tie up a rib with springs - normally people only bother overnight or in very bad conditions.

Make sure you have something you can use as a long tow rope. A painter on the front bow eye is normal. Need to find a neat way to tie it off when underway though - and make sure it is not long enough to reach your prop if dropped in the water.
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Old 08 April 2013, 15:14   #3
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Yes you can tie up a rib with springs - normally people only bother overnight or in very bad conditions.
Or if the tidal range warrants it.

I find a couple of springs and a shorter breast rope are sufficient for most situations. You don't have to use the springs as springs (as it were).
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Old 08 April 2013, 15:27   #4
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So if you go into a pontoon single handed where would you tend to go first as I looked at the possibility of a flush type cleat on the console sides but was advised that the console would not be strong enough I suppose a neatly laid bow and stern lines could work to pick up but I an used to tying of with a short mid ships rope ? Would the tube mounted hand hold take the pressure ?
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Old 08 April 2013, 15:33   #5
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Depends which way the wind is blowing - if from ahead then I'd obviously tie on the bow line the first and let the wind keep the stern in line (and vice versa if it is from the stern). The only complication is an offshore/offpontoon wind but if it isn't too strong and only for a short while I'd use a handle to tie off midships then sort out fore and aft lines.
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Old 08 April 2013, 16:04   #6
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...including a short single handed mid ships tie off at the helm
A very handy one. I keep a short line handy for quick grabs onto ladders and other boats, as you say, just at your hand.

Springs for when longitudinal movement might cause damage - so certainly on overnights etc...
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Old 08 April 2013, 16:15   #7
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A very handy one. I keep a short line handy for quick grabs onto ladders and other boats, as you say, just at your hand.

Springs for when longitudinal movement might cause damage - so certainly on overnights etc...
I return the painter once made off forward and tie off amidships to prevent longitudinal movement, sort of spring 'light'. It's a bit more ridgid than a true spring and not so safe if heavy weather is expected.
If it's gonna blow and she's tied 'longside, apart from crapping one, I tie off fore and aft, double spring and tie fenders horizontally to the pontoon aswell as load them along side.
I'd rather put her on a swinging mooring if it's foul.
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Old 08 April 2013, 16:24   #8
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So if you go into a pontoon single handed where would you tend to go first as I looked at the possibility of a flush type cleat on the console sides but was advised that the console would not be strong enough I suppose a neatly laid bow and stern lines could work to pick up but I an used to tying of with a short mid ships rope ? Would the tube mounted hand hold take the pressure ?
Tie your bow and stern lines together, then you've got them both with no hassle. Helps if they're a reasonable length of course.
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Old 08 April 2013, 16:29   #9
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So when you tie off at the stern are you referring to the cleats on the A frame or is it common to have stern cleats as I don't have any mounted at low level ?
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Old 08 April 2013, 16:33   #10
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So when you tie off at the stern are you referring to the cleats on the A frame or is it common to have stern cleats as I don't have any mounted at low level ?
I tie off on the frame, I also use the stainless grab handles and seat backs. I avoid tying to anything on the tubes if it's gonna get choppy.
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