Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 29 January 2009, 05:17   #1
Member
 
Country: Other
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 9
RIBs for flood/swiftwater rescue?

Good day to all! I'm new here. I was able to find this message board through research about RIBs and its application.

Here is our situation. We are planning to create a flood/swiftwater rescue team. We are considering RIBs because they can easily be transported (more compact) than other boats. However, we are concerned with maintenance requirements because our rescue team will be an all-volunteer team. There will be no full time staff. Someone has mentioned to me that RIBs are high maintenance. According to this person, one needs to do all sorts of stuff to preserve the rubber. Is this true? How are RIBs maintained?
__________________

__________________
iancg1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 05:23   #2
Administrator
 
John Kennett's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Brighton
Length: 3m +
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 6,830
They don't need any special maintenance. Like any other boat they benefit from a wash down after use, and are best stored under cover, but they're not high maintenance.

Having said that it they won't last particularly well if abused, and although tubes can be repaired they are obviously not as tough as an indestructible rotomoulded polythene boat - depending on what you actually plan to do, one of these might be a better option.
__________________

__________________
John Kennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 05:34   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Here
Boat name: doggypaddle
Make: Avon 5.4 Searider
Length: 5m +
Engine: yamaha 80
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,107
surely if you want something compact and easier to transport youre looking for a SIB? our local rescue people use 4m ish SIBS for rescue work
they draw very little water and can be deflated and stowed in the back of a landrover, they are small and light enough to use either with a small light outboard or paddles for flood work where the water is shallow, or commonly pulled along by someone in waders
RNLI use them inshore too. class D is it? someone here will correct me if iam wrong
__________________
I am usually not as green as i am cabbage looking.
doggypaddle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 06:56   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
Hi Ian - welcome & I hope you find the site helpfull - to clarify do you mean a RIB or SIB ? - As mentioend SIBs have no solid hull , unlike the RIB which will have a solid floor that cannot be folded in any way .

I think you mean SIB as you can either have sectioned floors ( that can be removed/ folded ) or air floors which can be deflated and folded/ rolled up etc .

I 'think' tha most flood rescue type work is completed by SIBs as they draw very little water, are normally lighter than the RIB equivalent ( hence able to be rowed/ pulled etc ) while still being able to take outboard engines that will allow then to be quick/ powerfull relative to the engine size/weight.
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 07:11   #5
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: WhiteNoise/Dominator
Make: Ballistic 7.8/SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Opti 225/Yam 85
MMSI: 235090687/235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,645
RIBase
Ian, what country are you in? There's a couple of companies in the UK who make very tough military SIBs (if that's what you want) that would be ideal.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 07:51   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
There are plenty of old Avons around that have been abused for 20yrs and are still going strong - the British Army aren't really known for being gentle with their kit!!!
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 08:20   #7
Member
 
havener's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Far west!
Boat name: Vigilant
Make: Humber
Length: 6m +
Engine: 90hp
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 505
Ian,

Swift/floodwater rescue is my speciality, having bee involved in the formation of a couple of teams, and continuing to train teams today.

RIBS / SIBS are not always the best craft for these environments - to give an opinion, I'd need to know a bit more about the terrain you're planning to operate in.

Drop me a PM on here if you'd like some help / advice.
__________________
havener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 10:30   #8
Member
 
Channel Ribs's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Channel Islands
Town: Alderney
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,047
Just to back up what everyone else has said, a soft inflatable boat is going to be a good bet for all the reasons given and more; not least of which is affordability.

In terms of rapid deployment an airdeck boat (biggest are around 3.5m) can be assembled, launched and be doing 15kn within 10 mins of arrival.

You can also customise a SIB so that you have removable consoles and other equipment, so that you can put the kit together to suit a particular environment.
__________________
Channel Ribs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 10:46   #9
Member
 
havener's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Far west!
Boat name: Vigilant
Make: Humber
Length: 6m +
Engine: 90hp
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by malthouse View Post
Just to back up what everyone else has said, a soft inflatable boat is going to be a good bet
Nooooo.....probably the worst thing to put into floodwater - extremely vulnerable to puncture damage, submerged barbed wire fences, floating debris, chemical or bio contamination, all sorts of nasties.

There is a specific type of inflatable useful for wier rescue (low head dams to our US cousins) or for mud rescue, but that's about it.
__________________
havener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 January 2009, 10:46   #10
RIBnet supporter
 
C2 RIBS's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Hants
Boat name: Gemineye
Make: Ribeye S850 charter
Length: 8m +
Engine: 300hp
MMSI: 235097445
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,029
Hi Ian Welcome. there are some very qualified people who use this forum in the market you are looking at. The main issue I see is the swiftwater and rescue scenario is very well handled by emergency services,fire brigades, RNLI and good volunteer groups and then the very specialised companies all who are well trained.

Flood response is an area I have developed alongside my RIB charters but through local emergency planning officers and I bought a 4.3 SIB which does not draw a large draft and can be pulled through water with persons and equipment on board, the engine can be lifted totally clear of the water line. I dont intend to cover rescue work/swiftwater as very specialised. I would not use a RIB in most flood waters due to draft and access to these areas is restricted . The other area a SIB can be used is local water events where a safety boat is needed but again not specific to rescue. You mentioned maintenace issues but I see both are similar as I keep all boats under cover.

As already said, what are the areas you are looking to work in which might help to point you towards the correct people.
__________________
Ian
Rib charter and Rib hire with www.c2ribs.co.uk
C2 RIBS is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 15:50.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.