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Old 30 December 2002, 12:17   #131
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Hi, David, thats good news as S/S tanks are expensive in the uk. I did feel rather lonely though trying to convince both Manos and Splodge that it was a safe material for petrol fuel tanks. More to the point any new users to ribs or this forum would easily get the wrong idea and could make a costly mistake if the facts were not throughly discussed.

Not sure what Wavehumper is going to do with the tank though if he buys it. His garage already far supasses Keith Harts shed!
His missus will though a track! (she is a good chef though, hint)

Wonder if slodge is reading this, no sorry I won't go there to much of a risk of this happening


Pete
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Old 30 December 2002, 12:34   #132
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Pete7 & David

I do not have anything against steal tanks.
In fact one fits on his boat what ever one likes or feels confortable with.
The point I was trying to make in earlier correspondace, after I got advise from specialists boat builders, is that although you can fit steal tanks on a mid size RIB (6.50-7.50 mtrs) is better alround to go for plastic tanks istead.
In all the boats I have had (that is RIBs and SIBs not the cruisers or the sailing boats) during my time in this World I always used plastic tanks. Never used SS tanks. Till now I'm very happy with the plastic tanks.
Someothers, like you 2 guys (and many more I think), use SS tanks.
All is OK if it does the job at the end of the day and you feel confortable with it too.
As we Greeks say 'NO PROBLEM' (with a Greek accent) LOLOL
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Old 30 December 2002, 12:50   #133
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Thought the quote should have been

"No ploblemo" aka Arnie in Terminator with a bad Italian accent.

But take your point though. Assuming a good plastic is used it does have one advantage in that the temperature changes in the uk winter won't cause condensation quite as bad as S/S. Which is were the water comes from when your start her up in the spring.

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Old 08 March 2003, 12:41   #134
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pete7
Wonder if slodge is reading this, no sorry I won't go there to much of a risk of this happening
Pete
I still think S/S tanks are s**t , maybe OK if your only gonna wallow about at low speed, but as soon as the impact's from high speed travel become "severe" S/S is as much use as t**s on fish!
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Old 08 March 2003, 14:07   #135
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I've never had a problem with S/S and I have been using them for 10yrs!!
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Old 08 March 2003, 16:59   #136
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Stainless steel would be my first choice too. It is an appropriate and proven material for fuel tanks on RIBs.

Not only does it work, but it makes it easy to build bespoke tanks to fit below-deck spaces maximising usable capacity. Sticking a plastic tank on the deck is a very poor second best.

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Old 09 March 2003, 05:01   #137
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Plastic tanks wasn't my alternative.
S/S has awful work hardening properties generally, and much worse adjacent to welds, if the tank in question is large enough to try and "pant" it's bottom surface, it WILL crack, baffles intended to both baffle fuel and stiffen usually cause the very problem the builder is trying to avoid.
I have tried SS for many different projects (not just marine apps) anything where the SS is subject to vibration or working (flexing repeatedly) of any sort is a huge no-no! it IS the worst material for fatigue.
Maybe smaller tanks in a situation where they are not abused too much with hard landings (clearly high performance boating or racing would fall under this) or as with some boats if the tanks are long flat and wide (as in my own1600x700x180) and built into the boat, under the floor, they will be forced to flex and move "with the boat" as it does the same, again this will only really happen on high perf boats.
As a fan of high perf stuff, and having a strong avertion to cutting floors out of boats I would NEVER use SS!, I geuss we must agree to dissagree.

If you ever have the time, try a work hardening test on a bit of SS and compare with a few other materials, you will be surprised.
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Old 09 March 2003, 07:06   #138
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SS has been used in fuel tanks for boats and ribs for ages as the prefered material,with very few complaining about there being problems.I have Alli tanks and again providing they are designd and tested and people havnt had problems then there is no big deal here.

JF if you are speaking from an outright speed perspective , that is not always the criteria,as as well as weight SS can give strength/weight to a struture dependant on design and also moves the CG forward.

SS is fine if you want longevity and strength in a rib,Alli is fine, I hope for both but is not as strong as SS but it has other qualities.
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Old 09 March 2003, 07:18   #139
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CH, there are many different types of "strength" durability is more important than outright strength, as for "fatigue" and "work hardening" I suggest you read up on it!
I worked for 7 years in the aircraft industry building airframes, and I can assure you SS is a absolute no no for any structural part that will encounter any form of repeated flexing, it's shite, period! what do you think the structures are made of, I'll tell you Ali or Titanium, I wonder why? and before you bang on about weight, go and read up on it.

P.S. please don't tell me you'd use your fuel tank as a structual part of your boat design!
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Old 09 March 2003, 07:40   #140
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JF

SS may on paper have all the bad qualities you mention,but in reality it works on ribs,weather its cos they dont get jarred like a hard boat as the tube softens the blows etc, I dont know but they work,and work well in the main.

I do know of a very good boat that has used tanks as part of the design brief to give strutural strength and it is one of the few a marvelous boats.

But in answere to the question ,Have we, then the answer is NO.
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