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Old 03 April 2003, 16:51   #1
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Rib stability & capsize

Other than from sheer overdoing it ( I have heard of two people recently been seperated from their boats ) anyone know of any cases of ribs being capsized in reasonable conditions ?

Crossed the Solent two weeks ago blowing only an easterly 3/4 wind against tide in a 36 ' yaght and beam on we were being really thrown around - waves wouldnt have appealed to me being in a 5 metre rib at all- they looked horrible, short , steep & beginning to break.

Funny enough I didnt see any ribs out to see how they handled it.

Maybe I underestimate their capability ? Particularly when I read manufacturers websites which state that a 5.5 metre plus rib can handle most seas !

Seems to me that yes the boats might be able to handle it, but all the occupants would probably have been bounced out of the boat.

I also read with interest the Sib expedition being planned & the possibilty of crossing notorious waters, this I would think is even harder for the occupants as sitting on the side of tubes must be very precarious in the slightest of seas ?
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Old 03 April 2003, 17:04   #2
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I guess if the ribs didn't capsize then there wouldn't be a need for Self righting equipment and you do see alot of it on military and rescue spec RIBs which have to go out in all weathers.

It is my understanding that a Camel trophy RIB was rolled near a reef by a large beam on wave at quite slow speed
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Old 04 April 2003, 03:22   #3
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It is possible to flip a rib, I know of two instances, one foolhardiness - driving rib at a large breaking wave stright on and getting pitch poled.
The other was when an instructor teaching a coming along side manover with a larger hard boat missed the fact that the student once gaining 'lock-on' had applied full throttle. Thus when a personel transfer was underway and the transferee jumped onto the sponson this broke the 'lock-on' and the rib powered under and flipped. No one was hurt and I was told by one of the people involved that there is an air pocket because thats were he was when she flipped.
Jelly
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Old 04 April 2003, 08:01   #4
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Quote:
I also read with interest the Sib expedition being planned & the possibilty of crossing notorious waters, this I would think is even harder for the occupants as sitting on the side of tubes must be very precarious in the slightest of seas ?
Yes, but what the heck, it's fun!

Actually I always hang on with a rope tied to the front of the boat.

Keith Hart
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Old 04 April 2003, 10:26   #5
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Sibs in roughty stuff

Quote:
Originally posted by Keith Hart


Actually I always hang on with a rope tied to the front of the boat.

Keith Hart
Hows that gonna keep you in the boat !

Keith as you have had a few years experience now in your sib what sort of conditions do you go out in ?, I have never seen any Sibs out in the Solent ever when its choppy, but I gather they are quite capable and very stable cos the bottoms really can stick to the water.

You must get bounced around like a cork though ?
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Old 04 April 2003, 16:35   #6
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Have used a Zodiac 12 footer and an Avon 18 footer regularly, 12 months of the year, timed sampling. (Timed by the date, not the weather). Zodiac, single 30, 3 cylinder, two stroke, Yamaha - tiller steered. Avon, twin inflatable keels, twin outboard, same yams, tiller steered, remote throttle and gears. No real problems - read the water, sit on the tubes in a "floppy" manner.
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Old 04 April 2003, 16:59   #7
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For an interesting account of flipping a rib look at Hot ribs.com and go to article 14 in the features section entitled "over and out"
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Old 05 April 2003, 02:36   #8
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Re: Sibs in roughty stuff

Quote:
Originally posted by matiboy
....I have never seen any Sibs out in the Solent ever when its choppy, but I gather they are quite capable and very stable cos the bottoms really can stick to the water.
Hmmm...not in my experience Matiboy. I was very successfully flipped in my SIB.

I was sitting on the starboard sponson to avoid the spray from a bit of a blow coming beam-on from the port side when the breeze got under the boat and unceremoniously dumped me in the briney.

Stick they don't.

If alone, always sit on the windward side of a SIB!
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Old 05 April 2003, 03:36   #9
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A sib/rib boat can be flipped by the force of any breaking wave that is higher than the size of its beam.

Phill That Zodiac configuration is used extensively for inshore rescues in NZ and Aus off the beach in quite big rollers.

There is a Rope attached to the bow ,where the third crew member hangs on,close up front to keep the nose down,whilst going through {Head On] the white water off the beach.


I would actualy say the best place to sit IMHO in a swell in a sib is all crew inboard on the centrline.Stay as low down as poss. For Head on stuff ,Man up front low down.
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Old 05 April 2003, 03:44   #10
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Re: Re: Sibs in roughty stuff

Quote:
Originally posted by Mike Garside


Hmmm...not in my experience Matiboy. I was very successfully flipped in my SIB.

I was sitting on the starboard sponson to avoid the spray from a bit of a blow coming beam-on from the port side when the breeze got under the boat and unceremoniously dumped me in the briney.

Stick they don't.

If alone, always sit on the windward side of a SIB!
I geuss this is the trade off! CH talks about the extra stability you get with the displacement of the tubes, with very little extra weight, after all, the PVC/Hypalon can't weigh much.

but that weightless extra area must be like a huge sail on a lightweight sib once the old wind gets under it!
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