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Old 16 June 2004, 03:43   #41
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thankyou Louise...tried Hotribs forum but it wouldn't let me post? As for the other jackets as well..I can definately see the appeal of the Musto jacket but like you said, the price is one that makes you go all giddy and faint.

John, thats why I wanted to develop something that will do what it says on the tin...its feedback like this I'm after..why wont a good technical jacket keep you dry? And if not what changes would you like to see in them to make them work better for rib users? I can appreciate the benefits of a dry suit but I didn't think it appealed to the masses due to the obvious inconveniences of wearing one (putting it on for starters!)..am I wrong? What is it that keeps you dry when wearing the dry suit that wont work for the jackets on the market?..the type of neck and wrist seals?..the breathability? I just didn't know if your average short distance day tripper/casual user would go the full hog and wear a dry suit?....or are the majority of ribbers the complete fanatical kit-guru type ?
let me know what you think.
chris
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Old 16 June 2004, 04:18   #42
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Perhaps you could design a fully waterproof, breathable technical jacket using neck and cuff seals and a drysuit zip. Obviously it would need to have trousers built in too. But then it would be a drysuit!

For "short distance/day tripper" use in good conditions then most decent outdoor clothing will do. If anything more than jeans, fleece and a windproof are needed, then it's a drysuit for me.

I think that most of the "obvious disadvantages" of drysuits are actually "perceived disadvantages". It's not that difficult to get one on and off, and although some people just don't get on with neck seals, if they are properly fitted they aren't uncomfortable.

I haven't looked at prices recently, but I would guess that a Ravenspring drysuit isn't all that much more expensive than a set of top quality waterproofs -- the real "obvious" disadvantage is that a drysuit is less versatile than conventional waterproofs and probably not well suited for hill walking

The big advantage of a drysuit is staying dry. If you can find another solution then you're probably onto a winner!

John
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Old 16 June 2004, 07:51   #43
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Thermal balance dudes

I have spent a long time in a neoprene dry suit and my esteemed club mates have told me their membrane experiences. Heat build up is the major problem for non-breathable fabrics. It took a week for my boots to dry out. Youll see a lot of divers handling boats in summer with the zip open.
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Old 16 June 2004, 07:56   #44
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nuther thing

I looked at the Musto smock that looks a cracking gizmo ideal for the kind of activity a diving boathandler would do. I've not tried a slightly longer jacket of the coastal or off shore variety.
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Old 16 June 2004, 10:54   #45
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how much perspiration/moisture build-up do you generally get on the interior of the dry-suit? (I take it a Ravenspring is your choice of product?!) I know alot of products are advertised as breathable but inevitably there are limitations with any of the breathable fabrics on the market - what base layer clothing would you/do you wear? And do you find drysuits have excessive temperature build up during summer periods? ( for example the excessive heat we've been experiencing recently..wahey!).
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Old 16 June 2004, 11:55   #46
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I have a drysuit made by Otter. They only really make diving suits, but were thinking of getting into the surface suit market a few years ago. They gave us some to trial going round Britain a few years ago. It only has a breathable back panel, but I find it keeps me very dry. One of my sweatier crewmembers didn't get on so well with his though!

Ravenspring drysuits are completely breathable, and I can't remember hearing a bad word about them. When they first came out I thought they looked a bit flimsy, but they seem to have stodd the test of time. It's probably what I would buy if I had to spend my own money

The Musto HPX suits perform excellently, but are rather more expensive.

My highly untechnical base layer is jeans, t-shirt and a fleece. It's hot sitting around waiting to get underway, but fine once you're going -- the same applies whatever you are wearing.

In these conditions I would probably just wear shorts and a t-shirt and get wet and sunburnt at the same time

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