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Old 10 December 2002, 16:34   #21
Country: UK - England
Town: Bromley, Kent
Make: GS209
Length: 6.137
Engine: 4.3ltr 210hp Volvo Penta
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 231

Sorry, but I am a bit confused, what is the difference between a mono cross on a m/cycle and the mono suspension on a bycycle? I mentioned cycle earlier as I thought that would be sufficient for the purpose, lets face it some of those cycles take a good bashing going down steep and rough hills. The cycle parts would be a lot cheaper I would think than the mono cross for a trial run, you could even have a lever to deactivate it and hold it firm for certain conditions. We just need someone with a bit of technical know how to look at the idea. You never know even a sprung seat like a normal cycle would take the harshness out of some of the bumps, it certainly would be better medicaly for your knees, and thighs.


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Old 10 December 2002, 17:40   #22
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Aberystwyth
Boat name: Undecided
Make: Undecided
Length: Undecided
Engine: Undecided
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 605
Don't know ANYTHING other than motorbikes other than they have 2 wheels, handlebars and an engine. The rear shocks on y-frame full suspension mountain bikes (the most common type) form one of the 2 links that the rear section of the frame has to the front section. The rear wheel is attached the to back section. The other connection between the 2 frame parts is the bracket near the pedals, which has bearings in to allow free movement (restricted only by the shock).

If I understand Keith here (be a miracle if I have), he's suggesting that at the front of the jocket seat, the seat would be connected to the body of the seat by a bracket with bearings to allow the seat to rotate about that point. You then attach the shock to the back part of the seat, set with about 50% of it's travel used when the driver is sat down.

Yes, the shocks used on higher-end mountain bikes do have lockout switches to lock the shock in position. These tend to be air shocks, which you change the air pressure inside to set the force needed to compress the shock. Some of the more expensive ones also have remote lock-out switches, which you could mount on your console for easy operation.

For one of these shocks, you're probably looking at around 3-500, so definately NOT cheap.
You could build up a workable version with one of the cheap coil shocks, you just wouldn't have the lock-out feature and it probably wouldn't survive quite as long.


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Old 22 December 2002, 05:31   #23
Country: Greece
Town: Gloucetsreshire
Boat name: GATO DI MARE
Make: MAR.CO
Length: 9m +
Engine: Yamaha 200Vmax
MMSI: 235027678
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,339
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I may be a bit late but you are absolutely right about the manufacturer and the seats. Never thought that they were so expenssive though

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