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Old 17 December 2012, 04:37   #11
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Sometimes when you have to be somewhere else you have to brave the weather. Practice makes perfect and trust your boat springs to mind. You need a good boat to start with though. Personally I don't like beam on high wind seas
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Old 17 December 2012, 04:47   #12
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Whenever I've seen that clip over the last few years it's always reminded me of a certain Ribnet cruise to Yarmouth quite a few years ago.

It was a bit rough and windy to say the least, and we should have all been sensible and stayed at home.

Most of the smaller boats stayed tied up in Pompey harbour and we all piled onto my Ocean and Old Spice back when Pete7 still had her.

Those on my boat I remember were Olyit, Jimbo, TimM, and his girlfriend.

We got out of the harbour and headed along the wall straight into a really confused sea.
We hit a particulary steep tall wave and went completely vertical.
To this day I don't know how we didn't go over backwards.

The sensible thing to do is stay at home if you have the option.

Nasher.
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Old 17 December 2012, 04:57   #13
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I'd go for beam seas being the scariest in general.

David
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Old 17 December 2012, 05:14   #14
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As to when to stay put, someone once said to me........

It's better to be on shore wishing you were out on your boat than to be out on your boat wishing you were ashore......
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Old 17 December 2012, 13:38   #15
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with the right length to match the beam and weight and with the right power on the transom even F6 /7 should not be a problem - as for the crew on board in such conditions than that is another matter.
By the way I am not on board this Parker 900 Baltic rib only my brother Philip with his son Chris having what seems to be fun for some and punishment for others.
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Old 19 December 2012, 12:22   #16
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Originally Posted by indaba1991 View Post



I am of the opinion that going down wind / waves (if possible) is the only way to go when conditions are extreme. He thinks good throttle control upwind is totally safe.
Neither is totally safe, of course. It does depend what boat you're in. I used to drive an RNLI Atlantic in some fairly big seas - many years ago now - and I feel for the Whitstable crew in the video!

The problem with going down wind and waves is that it usually ends up on the beach. In the big stuff, you may find you have no choice but to make your way to (relative) safety into the waves

As so many have said already though - best of all, just don't be there in the first place
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Old 19 December 2012, 12:34   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nasher View Post
Whenever I've seen that clip over the last few years it's always reminded me of a certain Ribnet cruise to Yarmouth quite a few years ago.

It was a bit rough and windy to say the least, and we should have all been sensible and stayed at home.

Most of the smaller boats stayed tied up in Pompey harbour and we all piled onto my Ocean and Old Spice back when Pete7 still had her.

Those on my boat I remember were Olyit, Jimbo, TimM, and his girlfriend.

We got out of the harbour and headed along the wall straight into a really confused sea.
We hit a particulary steep tall wave and went completely vertical.
To this day I don't know how we didn't go over backwards.

The sensible thing to do is stay at home if you have the option.

Nasher.
We went out to watch the round the island yacht race a couple of summers ago, sat off the needles in some nasty oncoming seas – got blown backwards off a very steep breaking swell and dumped right on our arse, I’m helming and a mate stood immediately behind me virtually went under…………….the boat landed right way up and after fanatically starting the engine we went into the shelter of alum bay for a shaky cup of tea!
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Old 19 December 2012, 12:53   #18
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Originally Posted by indaba1991 View Post


Having a big dispute with a mate regarding throttle control in heavy weather. Having bought a sea-going rib we are pretty sure one day to have to make our way home in bad weather.

I am of the opinion that going down wind / waves (if possible) is the only way to go when conditions are extreme. He thinks good throttle control upwind is totally safe. Does the video above prove my point?
No it doesn't prove your point.

Going upwind or down, at a certain point the waves are so steep you either stuff the bow or go end over end as shown. However in the clip shown, the steepness is a direct function of the beach/shore which is causing the wave to break in the first place. If you are crossing a bar or shoal that's when you get these types of waves. And going downhill on the exact steep breaking wave they flipped on would have been equally dangerous IMHO. They would have raced down the wave, buried the bow in the tough and then the breaking portion of the wave would have pushed the stern of the boat over their heads. The waves are too steep and high for that vessel's waterline length and they probbaly would have flipped regardless of direction of travel. As others have said, sometimes it just not safe and you shouldn't be out there period.
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Old 19 December 2012, 12:58   #19
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I have to say, I rarely take a big sea head on .. but then I'm mostly in deep water for my cruising .. I'll tack or follow but to me, the risk of a lot of your hull suddenly becoming visible to the wind is a very dodgy position to be in, because you cant be certain of the shape of the wave sometimes, particularly if the wind isnt with the tide, and therefore how quickly it will dissapear under you, and then neither do you know the strength of the wind/gust coming behind it. So its my least favourite option.

In the North Minch .. sometimes, heavy sea seems appear from nowhere, despite the best forecast, and prefering 'not to be out' isnt always an option, so knowing how to deal with it, and balance your boat appropriately for the conditions is an absolute must.
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Old 19 December 2012, 15:10   #20
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When you're racing you have no choice - in reality another coming from the beam is actually a real issue, especially with a strong wind. As has been said above you can adjust your driving to suit the conditions and different hulls respond differently so some are better in head seas and some not.

The thing to remember is the best decision you will ever make is not to go out when it's too rough - judging when it's too rough is the hard part!
Interesting thing in strong wind! I have been doing trials in the past few days on the Protector which is a relatively heavy boat. The weather has been pretty windy, wet and pretty rough because of some unusually high tides. In protected water in the Solent I noticed a very strong squall coming towards the boat - as it hit the attitude of the boat changed dramatically and the course made good altered about 30 degrees forcing me to turn hard into the squall to correct direction. I was travelling around 25 kts
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