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Old 07 August 2013, 18:52   #81
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Thanks for a great thread

Looking forward to the pics.

Think Mad Tubes And Linley Swan are Ribeye
Yep - Ribeye 6m
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Old 08 August 2013, 07:31   #82
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Speaking of photos, a local press photographer gave me a disk of 528 pics of the arrival in Killybegs. There are a few nice shots in there. The files are 5MB each and I'm not putting any of it online. However, if you were there and want one or two of your boat and crew, PM me your boat details/description and email addy and I'll send you a couple of your best.

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Old 08 August 2013, 07:48   #83
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please send over any you have of my Linley Swan Ribeye A600
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Old 08 August 2013, 09:42   #84
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Speaking of photos, a local press photographer gave me a disk of 528 pics of the arrival in Killybegs. There are a few nice shots in there. The files are 5MB each and I'm not putting any of it online. However, if you were there and want one or two of your boat and crew, PM me your boat details/description and email addy and I'll send you a couple of your best.

"RIBnet - serving the wider Community"
Try setting up a drop box account.?...seemed to work well on the round iow pics.....then people can find their pics and download full res ones :-)
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Old 08 August 2013, 10:18   #85
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Many thanks Paul for doing such a fantastic and dedicated job as safety boat. I know all the small ribs have said they could not have done the trip without all your help, advice and support you certainly went the extra 100 miles. It was a pleasure to cruise with you even if we were not with you all the time!!! All the best hope to meet up with you soon.

Gary (topcat)
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Old 08 August 2013, 16:51   #86
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Picked up a theme that a lot of people had issues with water in their VHF. Set waterproof but when water in mic or speaker they has accoustic issues. So did anyone's sets fair better?

Likewise bluetoot headsets - anyone have success?

Everyone seemed to like their helmets - all genuine geckos or anyone using something else?

Were the only people with fuel tank issues using stainless under deck units?
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Old 08 August 2013, 17:07   #87
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As a passenger for two of the long legs and general hanger on for a couple more, the scuttlebutt on the quay was:

Water - it was everywhere. Drysuits were essential, but luckily it was very warm (high teens) so while people got wet, hypothermia wasn't an issue.

Geckos were a Godsend - dunno how I would have managed without one. After wearing a helmet for eight hours being bounced about, you'll notice the fit. Inflating Gecko Mk10s are the business with the full face visors.

A lot of the VHF comms were rubbish because of wet mikes. A number of plotters and other lekkie bits gave jip. Antennae broke off.

Fuel bladders bust, fuel lines leaked, a steel tank split.

The SIMRAD gear on Skerryvore (two plotters, VHF, RADAR) all worked throughout. It was brand new however...

I was VERY proud of my home waters. They allowed all comers to pass but made sure they will never take those same seas for granted again
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Old 08 August 2013, 18:01   #88
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VHF got filled with water very quickly but a lot to do with positioning I think...my theory
When the unit is flush mounted to a sloping console, the speaker trapped water, when flush mounted vertically it wouldn't.
Had to bang the fist mic on the console and blow the water out to stand a chance of audible transmission.
After the Bangor Killybegs section tended to use the handheld whch I kept stuffed in my drysuit front pocket.
Gecko was brilliant
Dry Suit was great - no leaks (and I tested it more than most)
Stainless tank - I suspect mine is split.
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Old 09 August 2013, 08:46   #89
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Hats off to you Paul - I've only now got round to reading this string properly and absolutely no idea how you had the time or energy to do this every night! All I managed was a short tweet each night so say we were still alive!
This is epic, and fantastic to have - really enjoyed the read and it so improved my lunchtime sitting in the office today! Haven't decided whether I'll let my folks read it though!
Great getting to know you guys and a huge thanks again for everything you did last week and for what you and the rest of the Top Hat crew brought to the Round Ireland 2013 family! It was much appreciated.
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Old 09 August 2013, 15:44   #90
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Before commenting now on some of the kit, lessons learnt etc. a thank you to those who have commented about the role that Top Hat played in the event. We were only one of three of the safety boats all of whom fulfilled a similar role. Our focus though was on the small boat fleet. Thanks should go to Viv, Sammy & James (James had only been boating once or twice before) as they spent hours in rough seas keeping eyes on the craft we were shadowing. This sounds easy but in very large irregular seas it is far more difficult to track multiple craft than you might imagine – and is just as tiring as helming. Also credit to Buffa – he never moved from lying on the bench seat for 14 hours!! He only made two noises all the trip – to bark at a seal and to howl when the CG issued a DSC Urgency Alert when the CG were seeking Hugo’s party – a cool dog!

Raymarine e97 Hybrid Touch: Whilst I teach with this plotter often I rarely use it for personal navigation. It is a great piece of kit. I like the ability to use touch screen sometimes but equally to have a full set of controls as an alternative. What really makes this for me though is the fact that I can control it from a iPad. We have the control software loaded which allows 100% control of the plotter from within wifi range. We also have the Navionics Charts loaded. Therefore when I needed to navigate hard with the plotter I tended to take a seat away from the helm and use a mixture of the plotter software and the navionics. Routes plotted on the ipad transferred automatically to the plotter and vice versa. The GPS on the ipad always seemed to work fine giving a useful backup to the Raymarine. I appreciate that we were not on a RIB but on some RIBs with multiple seats the ability to move away from the console to use the plotter may be useful. Equally the ipad moves with you so you actually I actually often found it easier to control the plotter from the ipad than trying to use the real plotters controls. I will maintain that electronics must always be used alongside other techniques to back up the electronics but this was a first class unit. Things I would improve:
• The ability to run a route but also set the plotter to track another waypoint at the same time. I would use this to track the position off an object as I pass it (eg a rock) or use it for ‘bearing to compass rose’ plotting technique
• Below 166m the plotter reads in feet not metres and cannot be changed – bizarre
• There should be a dual radar screen so you can scroll in on one screen and out on the other – like with dual chartplotter screens

Autohelm – A great piece of kit for following a course. Not so great when following multiple RIBs as they tend to move around a bit

Icom VHFs – where possible I always try to fit dual VHFs. The benefit of doing so on this trip was that I didn’t need to use dual watch to monitor our working channel and 16/CG Working channel. The regular comms on 08 meant that sets tended just to monitor 08 rather than being returned to 16/08 after transmitting meaning less craft ended up monitoring 16 for major issues.

AIS – (Digital Yacht 2000) – a great piece of kit which we fitted the week before we left. We fitted it with its own aeriel for better performance (and is cheaper than using a splitter). Being able to track Merlin and Seawolf was handy. Advanced warning of big ships and some yachts was handy too. Clearly AIS was handy for those tracking us too. We have a switch to run silent though!

Donegal Fuel – the refueling guys. For petrol boats the event would have been impossible without them. They were 200% professional too.

Botnia Targa 30 (www.targa.fi) - An incredible boat. When it gets rough shut the doors, turn up the music and carry on!

Other things:

• Carry boards to hang outside your fenders – prevents damage to boat in many ports when alongside jetties. I appreciate this is not feasible on smaller craft
• For diesel boats take a funnel as fuel trucks often have big nozzles for fuelling trawlers
• Picking up pots was a real issue – have the means to cut them to hand

Regards, Paul
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