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Old 09 August 2004, 16:04   #11
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Gavin, I am aware that it is the rubbing strake, I just wondered how long tubes should last and how long these ones had been on that boat. This boat has had a good hammering and glue doesn't last forever as can be seen by the rubbing strake, just wondered if a full examination had been carried out on the rest of it, including the fittings to the hull. I must say I was impressed with the bouyancy, but to have that in an everyday RIB may be quite expensive.

I have often wondered why boats don't have a type of emergency bouyancy button, so when you are sinking you hit it and a big air bag fills the cabin, hopefully with nobody inside and keeps you afloat, easy really. (but not in this case when the cabin went for a wander )
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:06   #12
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The benefit of sitting in your armchair assessing these situations means it is easier for you to think about what could have been better and what YOU would have done.

The boat survived in a short period of time bigger waves than any of us will proabably meet in our boats over a longer period of time and even at the end of it managed to float and keep the lads safe and sound until the rescue took place.

What ever was done was done and they all survived, doesnt matter how or why they did so what ever they did they obviously did right no matter what went wrong. They are al out to tell the tale.

So it doesnt matter about fully submersable electrics and other gadgets most imortantly it is to keep a cool head and stay alive.

There i no more debate about this that and the other. The boat was well built to do what it did up to that point, if you ever have been on Spirit you will know what I am talking about.

Last year I was on Spirit on a flat calm day heading from the Needles to Portsmouth and I saw a large wake coming from a big tanker about to hit us side on. Jan and I were sat out the back whilst Clive and Alan were inside. I sat down and held on for dear life as that wave hit us side on, Jan was still holding his bottle of champers and 2 fingers on a grab rail. I sat down braced myself waited and as we boblled with very little movement over this wave I would have stopped my boat for, I felt like the worlds biggest FOOL. The boat hardly twiched and I at that point understood why this small boat went RTW in huge storms and made it. Also why the crew had so much confidence in Spirit as it is a confidence building boat, I never ever questioned it after that.

RIP Spirit.
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:06   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Halliday
If you want to see proof of "holes" in the sea, go to Hayling Island Sailing Club and look at the photo of a French trimeran of Ushant. It is just about to fall into a hole around 50m across and 10m deep which opened, and luckily closed, just in front of it.
Mark.......is this the one? If it isn't It is still bloody scary.

www.martin-raget.com/eng/poster/photo.cfm?collection=1&nomcollection=Marines%20pos ters&poster=1-022003-440

Oh and check out some of the other photos on his website. Superb.
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:15   #14
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DeepSole, Excuse me, but I think you are talking utter nonsense Firstly what is wrong with having submersable electrics? From reports, although I never believe a word that is in the press anyway, the batteries were about gone in their torches, what then. We are all here to learn and improve from others experiences, seems that you are one who never learns, can't think of logical ways to overcome problems from lessons learnt, or just expect others to do the brain storming

As for the wash 'story', if that wash was as big as you say I would expect a decent wobble on any boat, and I certainly wouldn't let wash hit me side on with nervous passengers like you (even if the boat could take it), especially without giving them a warning that it was coming, seems you escaped by the skin of your teeth on that one
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:26   #15
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Alan,

Thanks for posting your report - that can't have been an easy post to write. Your description of a rogue wave was graphic, interesting & bloody scary!

I would like to make the following observation: IMHO your rescue, and that of the rowers in Pink Lady yesterday, was successful for the following reasons:

1 You knew where you were.
2 You were prepared.
3 You had the right equipment & knew how to use it.

So here's the rub, how many of us who take to the water in our leisure time can say yes to all 3 of the above? I hope the answer is all of us, but I suspect that's not the case. If you have said yes then good on you, but how about the rest of the crew if you were knocked out, or fell overboard?

I think we should all learn from this positive aspect of your experience and hopefully if we ever need the rescue service we can make their job a lot easier and live to tell the tale.

Meanwhile, what should people like you and your team do? Give up adventuring? I hope not.

Regards.
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:29   #16
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Robin, I would be interested to know who and how that photo was taken, must have been someone with a cool head and at a bit of height to get the shot, or perhaps a computer and photo shop
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Old 09 August 2004, 16:37   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peteb
Robin, I would be interested to know who and how that photo was taken, must have been someone with a cool head and at a bit of height to get the shot, or perhaps a computer and photo shop
Dunno. Wasn't there, can't pass any judgement or informed comment. I just like the picture. It makes me glad I wasn't there.
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Old 09 August 2004, 17:36   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peteb
DeepSole, Excuse me, but I think you are talking utter nonsense Firstly what is wrong with having submersable electrics? From reports, although I never believe a word that is in the press anyway, the batteries were about gone in their torches, what then. We are all here to learn and improve from others experiences, seems that you are one who never learns, can't think of logical ways to overcome problems from lessons learnt, or just expect others to do the brain storming

As for the wash 'story', if that wash was as big as you say I would expect a decent wobble on any boat, and I certainly wouldn't let wash hit me side on with nervous passengers like you (even if the boat could take it), especially without giving them a warning that it was coming, seems you escaped by the skin of your teeth on that one
Pete

Submersable Electronics, what for when they are submersed you aint going to sit there saying ooh look is that a whale on the RADAR glug glug. Best to have a waterproof handheld in your grab bag or survival suit.

Me never learns, well you obviously dont know me that well. Guess your wrong again you have never met me so cant really judge me you never went on Spirit so how can you really judge what the boat was like either. I know me so I can criticise me and I also have been on Spirit, sat on it driven it etc etc Didnt use the toilet though it was a bit drafty.

Believe me I am no worried passenger if you have ever been on my boat arond the C I you will know that. Again you would of had to have been there on the boat experiencing what I did to criticise.

Alan did not alter course cos he knew that it was nowt to worry about so neednt give any warning. I judged the wave to move the boat with its small beam a much greater distance than it did. My 26 footer would have been all over the show in comparison but I judged wrong and the boat handled it perfectly, much better than all of the RIBs I have been in.

Were you there for the homecoming party? By the way lots of HAPPY smilies on your posts
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Old 09 August 2004, 17:37   #19
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Alan P, Thanks for posting the update, it does sound like you were lucky to survive and a testament to the strength built into Spirit. She certainly looked in fine order when you left Donhagadee although the photos below doesn't really do her justice!

As far as Mr Peteb goes. Those who wish to understand more about his thoughts on RIBS and boating in general might do a search under the ID "Flanker" and on ybw.com under "happy1"
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Old 09 August 2004, 18:00   #20
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Well Dom you have met me, I sat at the same table as you with my wife and baby at Mercury marina, we had a good chat, I then spoke to a guy that was with you, could it have been your father or father in law? anyway I spoke to him for about an hour or so. Anyway, you put me off taking a boat anywhere near those islands with the rock stories

Alan, yes you will see that safety is my highest priority, unfortunately it is poo pood (is that the spelling) by some who go on a wing and a prayer. I have made it clear from the start that I respected the way that the crew had the correct equipment and the good drills carried out, there is no doubt that saved lives. It is also good to talk about the safety aspects and see if we can learn any more, I am sure that there will be feed back way above my head to RIB builders, but I can comprehend and understand the likes of being in the pitch black and having to lay my hands on something. I spent time ensuring that I knew each part of my engine, parts I could get to, hence my choice of a Volvo over the mercruiser for the impellor, I also ensured I had the correct spanners and tools to undertake any job I could. I have ensured that I have what I feel is the correct safety equipment, my kit list was again poo pood as a waste of time by some, but I have used it in anger on more than one occasion rescuing families including children. Examples are a sinking boat with 2 adults and 2 young children, I had to get them out of the water, raft to the vessel and use a pump I had on board to re float it, whilst my wife rendered first aid, including the use of our space blankets and spare dry clothing. Another one, a broken down boat sportsboat with 2 adults and 3 children on board with no communications, lifejackets or means of propulsion in a shipping lane! I towed them to safety, and after speaking to trhe coastguard was asked if the tow was going OK and if it was to take them to the slipway they launched from! I did wonder if that was in the job description of someone who was 'just passing', anyway it cost me 59 of fuel and the loss of a day out, but they did say thank you, and you never know it could be you one day.

So safe boating
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