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Old 02 July 2012, 03:47   #31
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What effect would this 'new' drink boating regulation have on your little jaunts to Islay or Jura I wonder?
Absolutely none. I'm always "road legal" when I'm on the helm.
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Old 02 July 2012, 04:04   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin View Post

What effect would this 'new' drink boating regulation have on your little jaunts to Islay or Jura I wonder?
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Old 02 July 2012, 04:12   #33
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How would you enforce drink regs against someone sitting on a yacht, anchored, sipping a few glasses of wine or something similiar where the qualified skipper was elsewhere, tied to a mooring or at a dock?
How would you police this anyway?
Simple, the same way Police enforce the drink driving regs to passengers of cars! ie it doesnt apply!

Right now the law is I can drive around in any size vessel i want,(as long as it is private, and i do not take money for passengers) at almost any speed i want, pi**ed as a fart, and unless I cause damage or hurt anyone I am not causing offence.
I can then moor (if I am able) and as soon as I go to open the drivers door of a car I am guilty of a serious offence (or even ride a bycicle,) for which I can be jailed.
This surely cannot be right???

I just fail to see why any normal person would argue against a regulation of this sort.

And BTW I really do enjoy a pint, am not in any way teetotal. I just dont do boats and booze together!
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Old 02 July 2012, 04:21   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin View Post
A matter of priorities for our Governments to decide.

What effect would this 'new' drink boating regulation have on your little jaunts to Islay or Jura I wonder?
Not a new regulation at all.

After the Marchioness disaster, The one on the Thames,(in which alcohol was a factor) the government proposed regulations to make it an offense for anyone to be in control of a vessel who was drunk.
Enter RYA, bitterly complained, and campained, resulting in a law being enacted to affect any one in charge of any commercial vessel (almost), and at present the government is still trying to enact it for all vessels, and the RYA is still opposing it.

So it would be newly enacted, but has been knocking around for years.

There are probably about half a dozen cases per year of comercial captains being sent down, or heavily fined for being drunk, and rightly so.
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Old 02 July 2012, 12:02   #35
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On the Thames at least it is now illegal to be in control of a vessel when over the alcohol limit, unfortunately it is now also no longer possible to go over 12 knots if one of you doesn't have Advanced Powerboat and the other Powerboat Level 2 (which is required to ensure they are competant at keeping lookout apparently).

Therefore, some regulation is good, some is just plain stupid.
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Old 02 July 2012, 13:28   #36
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Is there really a problem limiting leisure boaters to a set distance from the coast? (as a percentage, how many ribnetters genuinly go beyond 5 miles of the coast anyway?)

If you want to go further afield, do the extra exams and get the right boat, its simple.

Simon
Everyone who ribs in the Channel Islands regularly goes more than five miles offshore. French ribbers have limitations and this is reflected in their two-tier club memberships; something we all find a little strange. I would give up boating if I was limited to where I could go. Actually, I think I'd just ignore the restrictions and go anyway.
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Old 02 July 2012, 16:27   #37
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Agree with the Darwin principle for most open waters. If I want a few cans on the boat over a couple of hours while fishing, I see no harm. I'll make my own judgement as to how much i drink, im an adult, theres no one around normally so leave me be.

The rules as I understand are if I'm a danger to shipping/others or unable to make headway I can be stopped by an official and held until the police come. (can't remember where I heard that, but makes sense)

However in busy areas I see no harm in local speed limits and buoyed areas being enforced.

This seems to be the case already IMHO.

Personally I object to children being able to drive boats alone over a set size or hp.

This would be a very simple one to enforce.

My tuppenth worth
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Old 02 July 2012, 16:50   #38
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Originally Posted by GJ0KYZ

Everyone who ribs in the Channel Islands regularly goes more than five miles offshore. French ribbers have limitations and this is reflected in their two-tier club memberships; something we all find a little strange. I would give up boating if I was limited to where I could go. Actually, I think I'd just ignore the restrictions and go anyway.
Amazing....
The french system actually limits you to 6 miles off the coast... This certificate is achieved after quite an easy three day course in which the syllabus is made up roughly half/half theory/practical.... It covers all the basic safety issues and gives the user a good knowledge base before they set off.
Most people are happy with this but for those that wish to go further the can opt for the 'extension' to their 'permis cotier' and do 'l'extension haute mer'. This is very similar to ourPB2 ticket. With perhaps a bit more chart work involved.
I personally think this is a good idea.

Fantastic to hear that, had a system like this been implemented in the CI's, you would have taken the very responsible attitude of completely ignoring it... Well done

Simon
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Old 02 July 2012, 17:46   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonto

Not a new regulation at all.

After the Marchioness disaster, The one on the Thames,(in which alcohol was a factor) the government proposed regulations to make it an offense for anyone to be in control of a vessel who was drunk.
Enter RYA, bitterly complained, and campained, resulting in a law being enacted to affect any one in charge of any commercial vessel (almost), and at present the government is still trying to enact it for all vessels, and the RYA is still opposing it.

So it would be newly enacted, but has been knocking around for years.

There are probably about half a dozen cases per year of comercial captains being sent down, or heavily fined for being drunk, and rightly so.
Apparently lesure boaters can still be prosecuted for being drunk the same as for driving with the same limits but with a concession for boats under 23 feet traveling less than 7 knots. You can still be had doing that if you pose a danger.

That seems sensable to me.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...ive-rules.html

My main issue with mandatory safety equipment is the on going cost of the inevitable boat MOT (i'm not arguing that it's not important to carry it). I deliberately bought a boat that was exempt from the BSS to avoid the cost of the test because I mostly use my boat inland but I still purchased all the recommend safety equipment.

Overall I suppose I'm sick of being nannied by the state. But also it seems to me a lot of casual boaters who have a small SIB or RIB they use a few times a year would end up being excluded if they had to jump expensive regulatory hoops before they can get started.
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Old 02 July 2012, 17:59   #40
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Amazing....
The french system actually limits you to 6 miles off the coast... This certificate is achieved after quite an easy three day course in which the syllabus is made up roughly half/half theory/practical.... It covers all the basic safety issues and gives the user a good knowledge base before they set off.
Most people are happy with this but for those that wish to go further the can opt for the 'extension' to their 'permis cotier' and do 'l'extension haute mer'. This is very similar to ourPB2 ticket. With perhaps a bit more chart work involved.
I personally think this is a good idea.

Fantastic to hear that, had a system like this been implemented in the CI's, you would have taken the very responsible attitude of completely ignoring it... Well done

Simon
But it isn't just the person, it's the boat The boats that I & others are hoping to cross the Irish sea in next weekend, would be subject to the 6 mile "Abris" rule. Yet a "merry fisher" with a conservatory as an excuse for a cabin would be allowed
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