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Old 29 December 2006, 18:07   #51
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Originally Posted by Jono Garton View Post
This is an interesting method of laying somone up in the boat. I havnt got a great experiance with spinal recovery boards, do the hands not go within the straps?

Note: No Lifejackets again "not exactly advertising best practice"
Hi Jono, I see you mention Laying a person in the boat so i thought that I would just add MarkM`s photo which is a different laying in the boat.
http://dng.ie/search_result_detail.cfm?ID=106865

See under sex in a Rib currently on view.
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Old 29 December 2006, 18:38   #52
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Nice one Aidan

Is this your house? http://dng.ie/search_result_detail.cfm?ID=106865

Jono
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Old 30 December 2006, 00:05   #53
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for the record, most of these were beach dives, among fairly inactive, but certified, divers. jky
Sadly an increasing problem in the UK too. 20 years ago if you couldn't free dive 7m in a wetsuit and bring a brick back up you failed, so only the fit went diving. Now anyone who can self certify themsleves fit can do it

Paul makes a good point with the tubes on a P22, we recover divers over the stern as the tubes are to high, we even keep the engine running whilst divers swim round the stern and life jackets are carried but rarely used unless its a boat handling course or really scary conditions. However everyone will have a drysuit (or occasionally a wetsuit) on since you can't actually dive with a lifejacket on and an auto would be a disaster on a dive boat with that much water coming aboard during diving operations.

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Old 30 December 2006, 01:47   #54
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Sadly an increasing problem in the UK too. 20 years ago if you couldn't free dive 7m in a wetsuit and bring a brick back up you failed, so only the fit went diving. Now anyone who can self certify themsleves fit can do it
Way off topic, but my dive buddy, who is an instructor, had a student who ended up winded coming out of the water. My friend asked if he was OK, and the guy, in broken, wheezing breaths, said " I... guess... that pneumonia.... really does... make a .... difference..." [He did not continue in the class. Didn't get his money back, either.]

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Old 30 December 2006, 02:49   #55
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Originally Posted by Jono Garton View Post
This is an interesting method of laying somone up in the boat. I havnt got a great experiance with spinal recovery boards, do the hands not go within the straps?

Note: No Lifejackets again "not exactly advertising best practice"
That because they are beach lifeguards Jono and we don't wear them. We have a choice of the helm wearing a PFD or not as when you enter the water to effect a rescue they are of no use.
Nice to see you looking on the net for information though.

Re the spinal board you are right arms should be inside the webbing I must update that picture from my website well spotted.
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Old 30 December 2006, 06:43   #56
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Way off topic,
The point is that we didn't see fat people diving, afterall how are you going to lift a 300 lb diver that weights as much as a Yamaha 115 back into the boat ?

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Old 02 January 2007, 05:37   #57
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Just a few pics of how to recover an able person from the water.
Seen this geezer in the drink before, seems to make a habit of it, looks to me like he has fallen out of the Ty Coch Pub (arguably the pub with the best location in uk [Sunday Times] see www.tycoch.co.uk) If anyone sees this M.O.B.y Dick in the water leave him there it's his natural environment. Best way to recover mob is by a swimming ladder GET A MEDLINE
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Old 02 January 2007, 05:50   #58
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Jono

Seems approiate seeing that you are talking about man over board drills and have included some photos there. One interesting thing I would pick up on is why neither of the crew in the boat are wearing a bouyancy aid or lifejacket. If either of these 2 had gone overboard in the current conditions, they would not have long in the water with tempertaures at the moment, before hyperthemia setting in and would have trouble staying afloat. At least if they had one on then they would have some bouyancy provided.

A golden rule that I teach and all other instructors that I know teach, that is before going on the water, you must be wearing either a lifejacket or bouyancy aid depending on what activity you are doing.

Seems like these crew need to be advised to wear some form of flotation,and would have expected that you would have insited that they wear something before stepping foot in your boat.

Rich
Yeah but these guy's didn't stand a chance someone has flogged their lifejackets see this post http://rib.net/forum/showthread.php?t=17440
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Old 04 January 2007, 11:54   #59
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Simon


The old dunk em pull em is far more dangerous for both parties.

Jono
That's the method that the BSAC taught me in the 70's, do they still teach it?

Why is it dangerous to both parties?
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Old 05 January 2007, 05:27   #60
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That's the method that the BSAC taught me in the 70's, do they still teach it?

Why is it dangerous to both parties?
1 - Risk of water inhalation by the casualty on the downward "dunk"

2 - If pulled into the boat facing upwards, the spine's curvature is stressed in the wrong direction as the spine curves over the tube

3 - The casualty can't be recovered facing inward to the boat as the (hopefully) inflated lifejacket impedes recovery

4 - The obvious risk of muscle / tendon strain to the rescuer associated with lifting heavy leads

5 - The chance of the rescuer being pulled overboard by the casualty - especially if the casualty is wearing "normal" clothing which will have become weighed down with water.

OK, some of these risks are associated with all recovery methods, but like anything it's a balance of mitigating as many risks as possible before embarking on a course of action.

Regardless of casualty condition, best method is still cradle / rope log roll.
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