Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 27 December 2006, 14:07   #21
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoo View Post
I also appreciate that no one has begun lecturing me on the evils of diving on my own. That has not always been the case in diving forums!
Yeah, well...

What I've noticed on a lot of diving forums (and boating forums, to be truthful) is that while typing on the keyboard, people tend to go by the book and go a bit further than frown on anyone operating on the fringe.

I can't lecture you, as I usually (well, maybe a bit less than usually) dive solo, or virtually solo (I shoot pics; most of my buddies don't. We don't spend a lot of time very close together, as they're trying to see as much as possible, and I'm trying to see less of them while I shoot. With those that do have a camera, separation helps in not scaring the wildlife, keeping silting to minimum, etc.)

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 14:12   #22
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Verwood, Dorset
Boat name: Unfinished
Make: Pacific 22
Length: 6m +
Engine: 140 mermaid
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 38
This post is very pertinent to my situation as my wife and I spend a lot of time discussing how to retrieve her from the water.
My missus is parralysed from the waist down.. Horse riding accident. but she adores driving the ribs we have owned
and on a number of occasions has expressed a desire to take
a dip but unfortunately we have struggled to find a dry suit for her.
so it has not happend yet.
Now after seeing this post I feel much more confident about recovery.
She obviously would not be able to kick to assist me so legs first is a super idea.
Thankyou very much!!

but of course I would wear a life jacket
Clive
__________________

__________________
Clive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 14:29   #23
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 6m +
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton View Post
I agree every one is free to criticise, however its just discouraging people from posting useful info.
Perhaps given that many forum members know you are an Advanced Powerboat Instructor and Principal of a busy centre (and are planning on taking your RYA Powerboating further) a small note to the effect that you would reccomend lifejackets would have been in order? Just a thought - but you are in a position where what you say and post (not least as a trade member) sets an example to others...

On the MOB method - having tried this a couple of times, it really is quite easy, even with large people (when I say large, I'm talking about this size of laser (rich) or even bigger!). It's easiest with 2, but still do-able with one, you just have to watch you don't give the casualty a dunking while you're maneuvering them into position!

I've found in the couple of times I've practiced it that because 90% of their weight is taken by the tubes, it's a simple roll rather than a lift. Easy Peasy.
__________________
Jimbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 14:59   #24
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton
My point was I,m not posting about driving in fog or someone wrapping my desk in paper, just posting some pics to help people, if they end up in this situation another of way easily getting someone back in the boat.

I agree every one is free to criticise, however its just discouraging people from posting useful info.
I don't see how a constructive discussion discourages people from posting.

Had the comments been completely irrelevant, abusive or thread drift then I could understand your attitude, but as it was a relevant point (particularly for anyone else that might choose to practice following your method) - it comes across as though you are infallable or not open to constructive criticism. THAT attitude - makes people less likely to offer criticism or advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton View Post
dont try to hard or they will go out the otherside of the boat.
Presumably that applies to the crew recovering the MoB too?
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 15:48   #25
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Brum
Boat name: UTV
Make: zodiac FR
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke 15hp
MMSI: 999
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 379
Wow, thats a clever way, legs first and all. Thanks for sharing it
__________________
Big waves, small boat ;)
tinker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 21:10   #26
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Southampton
Boat name: DynaMoHumm/ SRV/deja
Make: Avon8.4, 5.4 & 4.777
Length: 8m +
Engine: Cat3126 Yam 90 &70
MMSI: 42
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,556
You may well be right

Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
Personally, I think the best first course of action for a solo aid provider (assuming difficulty in getting the victim back onboard), would be to get on the VHF and yell for help. You wouldn't want them going overboard as well, or getting injured in the recovery.

jky
I ansolutely agree that the radio is the first thing to be used in an emergency but that wasn't the question that matey asked was it| If i recall correctly it was how's that small lady gonna get big old me in the boat.

Can you give me four examples of why a diver might be unconcious ? I am presuming theres no Sharks or stingrays off the coast of Tobermoray
__________________
Here it comes again, I don't stand a chance
Soul possession, Got me in a trance
Pullin' me back to you - Deja Voodoo
Rogue Wave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 December 2006, 23:03   #27
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Wave View Post
I ansolutely agree that the radio is the first thing to be used in an emergency but that wasn't the question that matey asked was it| If i recall correctly it was how's that small lady gonna get big old me in the boat.
My idea was that she isn't.

Call for help, and wait for the cavalry. That is actually an agreement that an instructor buddy of mine (about 300lbs) and I (about 170lbs) have. Anything happens, I do what I can to keep him comfortable and/or alive, but he's in the water 'til the Coast Guard (or other assistance) arrives.


Quote:
Can you give me four examples of why a diver might be unconcious ? I am presuming theres no Sharks or stingrays off the coast of Tobermoray
Probably an incorrect assumption.

1) rapid ascent and resulting air embolism.
2) near drowning
3) contaminated air fill leading to CO poisoning
4) Decompression sickness causing stroke (bubbles in the bloodstream.)
5) hypothermic coma
6) Marine life poisoning (jelly stings, reaction to rockfish spines, etc.)
7) Heart attack
8) Odd pressure/drug interactions

None are likely to occur in your average dive (and there are probably several dozen more that can be listed, and the list grows as you depart from "recreational" scuba parameters), but they remain a small possibility nonetheless.

jky
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28 December 2006, 05:32   #28
Member
 
havener's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Far west!
Boat name: Vigilant
Make: Humber
Length: 6m +
Engine: 90hp
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 505
Thanks for the pics Jono, interesting techinique.....but....

The concept of this frightens the life out of me.

Just discussed it with out MO, who happens to be an othopaedic specialist. He is still gibbering in a corner.

Risks are :

1. The spine is just NOT designed to take load like that. Nearly all the pulling force is in a lateral movement on the shoulder blades and transferred to the base of the spine.

2. When practiced by non professionals, the first thing that will happen is someone light will be yanked aboard and impact unprotected head on console / dive bottle rack / anchor chain / etc.

3. The risk of strain injury to the person doing the pulling is significantly above that acceptable.

4. Anything which significantly deviates from keeping the casualty horizontal after an unexpected entry into cold water will put extra strain on the heart.

To be constructive, preferred methods of recovery would be :

First - try the "dunk twice and pull under the shoulders" method which uses bouyancy to aid the operation (remove any oars stored on the tubes first)

Second - roped log roll over the tubes with lines under the casualty.

Obviously, if the person is fully able to aid themselves, use the engine skeg method described in another post.

If the RNLI are teaching this, I'm appalled and will take it up with them and the MCA. Frankly, its dangerous.

Simon
__________________
havener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28 December 2006, 05:37   #29
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Stanley, Falkland Is
Boat name: Seawolf
Make: Osprey Vipermax 5.8
Length: 5m +
Engine: Etec 150
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,688
What do folks think of carrying a big ratchet strap in the boat and using it as a makeshift "winch" to help pull fat blokes back on board? You could put it on to the mooring cleat on the other side and hook it onto the lifejacket recovery ring or even strap round under their arms. Even if it didn't do the job alone, you could take up the tension, give them a heave aboard, take up a bit more, heave a bit more and so on.

Its a bit crude but it might work and for a tenner or so it would be worth a try?
__________________
A Boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by fibreglass, into which you throw money...

Sent from my Computer, using a keyboard and mouse
BogMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28 December 2006, 06:10   #30
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Pwllheli-North Wales
Boat name: Delta 1
Make: Delta
Length: 6m +
Engine: Mariner 90hp Optimax
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 2,367
Simon

When you have tried this method, post again, it really doesn't put any strain on either party. Its about using weight not strength.

The old dunk em pull em is far more dangerous for both parties.

Jono
__________________

__________________
JG Marine Services Ltd Specialist Safety Boat Services

Bodfuan Shoot Ltd Traditional British Game Shooting
Jono Garton is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:32.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.