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Old 04 October 2005, 17:02   #21
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Are you sure you can handle that much drool?
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:06   #22
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Off Topic!

Hugh Jardon! Yer message box is full. Can't send a message.

On Topic!

DROOL IS COOL!
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:25   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
There are various guards around that will help but you get less power and use even more fuel. They aren't really practicle.
These guys would appear to dispute that:

http://www.outboards-direct.co.uk/aw...elst.asp?rip=8

(see bottom of page)

I have no practical experience of them so can't comment. If they save serious injury or death however I would say a loss in fuel consumption or performance may not be the be all and end all.

However my concern would be that because you no longer perceive the prop as being a risk (either consciously or sub-consciously) then you are actually less careful with your boat handling etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
The RNLI manage without prop guards as do many other recue outfits - just be aware of the dangers!!!
And I think the reason for this is that all of their crews are very experienced / well-trained. As implied elsewhere in this post the major risk will come from lack of training or experience. Although wearing a kill cord is essential to protect the prop risk after accidentally ending up in the water I suspect the prop guard is just as (if not more valuable) in protecting users who have intentionally enterred the water - e.g. for skiing, wakeboarding, diving etc.

Please also bear in mind that whilst the mincer at the back is a potential hazard, that the solid hull on a RIB is a serious risk to anyone in the water (as it will be there head it hits). Even at a few knots this really hurts.

My rule would be that only competent people drive the boat during the recovery of people from the water.

HTH
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:44   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart

However my concern would be that because you no longer perceive the prop as being a risk (either consciously or sub-consciously) then you are actually less careful with your boat handling etc.


HTH
VERY good point - bit like the way accidents went up after ABS brakes were introduced - people thought normal rules don't apply anymore!!!
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:45   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart
My rule would be that only competent people drive the boat during the recovery of people from the water.
My rule would be that only competent people drive the boat.
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:50   #26
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Fair point richard. I guess what I was trying to get at though was that at some points in time you may chose to let your friend / children etc have a shot under close supervision. Recovering real people from the water is not one of those times! If you need to learn to recover people from the water do it with an inanimate object until! Then once you are competent move on to real people.
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Old 04 October 2005, 17:55   #27
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I would like to take this opportunity to apologise to any newcomers on here who come along for some ADVICE!!!

The constant warring and snide remarks are bound to put people off - also the threads seem to keep going TOTALLY off topic.

Please note I do NOT attack anyone on this forum - just defend myself when I feel it neccessary.

If people feel a need to keep attacking me - fine - I will not give them the satisfaction of replying - it's not fair on others.

And finally YES I also find it very boring!!!
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Old 04 October 2005, 18:01   #28
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yes, back on topic ;-) and thanks for your apology c-p

Mr Polwart, yes I know where you're coming from. Be aware that aside from the desire to give friends and family a go at driving the boat, the very best thing to do is put them on a course with an instructor who's used to this sort of thing. They really are very good!

You will never be ready to move on to recovering real people from the water. The first time will catch you completely unprepared! Eeek, have you had that first time yet?
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Old 04 October 2005, 18:01   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hard1
Off Topic!

Hugh Jardon! Yer message box is full. Can't send a message.

On Topic!

DROOL IS COOL!
just checked it and all is clear, send em on in!!!


as cool as the drool on a houndogs tool!!
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Old 04 October 2005, 18:50   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
You will never be ready to move on to recovering real people from the water. The first time will catch you completely unprepared! Eeek, have you had that first time yet?
I totally agree. My comment about the hull being hard and sore was based on personal experience from a very experienced (and trained!) RIB driver getting it slightly wrong.

I have had "my first time" (and multiple times!) and compared to recovering them in a sailing dinghy doing it in a powerboat is actually pretty straight forward - so much more control! There's a big difference between planned recovery of a person from the water (from either a sailing or power boat) and an emergency MoB procedure - the Eeek factor really kicks in then.
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