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Old 17 December 2007, 09:19   #1
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Pacing

Now, I realise this is a big no-no as far as the RYA are concerned, but it's a technique that I've actually used quite a lot.

I understand the RYA are saying it's dangerous, yet in this article RNLI RIB training - Paul Glatzel it's clear that the RNLI still use it as a technique.

The boats that I have paced, have all been roughly the same size (within a metre), and we've never had any problems.

Can somebody explain to me, exactly what the danger is... in a bit more detail than "the boat will get sucked around/under". I would like to understand exactly what the two boats will be doing and how they effect each other to create problems.

Cheers,
WMM
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Old 17 December 2007, 09:31   #2
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My understanding is that it's contact pacing that the RYA have a problem. Non contact is ok............?
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Old 17 December 2007, 09:38   #3
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Originally Posted by whiteminiman View Post
I realise this is a big no-no as far as the RYA are concerned
When I did my Instructors course, pacing was part of the syllabus. I think it's a shame the practice is discontinued because it was useful to practice the finer points of boat handling. It's not without risk but for the students, it was an exciting part of the course

With the current emphasis on risk assessment and health and safety procedures, one day soon the level two course will be held in a padded room.
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Old 17 December 2007, 09:39   #4
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I had a quick Google around and came up with these:

From the RYA West Midlsnad web site:

"PACING BETWEEN POWERBOATS BANNED BY HQ

At the West Midlands Regional Instructor Conference Paul Mara (Chief Powerboat Trainer for the RYA) stated that the RYA have recently been made aware of a number of boating accidents where Instructors have been carrying out pacing between powerboats on Level 2 Powerboat Courses, as a post course addition. Not only are these not within the syllabus but are not part of any Powerboat courses within the RYA Powerboat Scheme. All instructors are reminded that the only pacing allowed to be taught as part of the syllabus is between a single powerboat and a dinghy as part of the Safety Boat Course Syllabus.

Carrying out pacing between powerboats at Training Centres is prohibited. For more details on this please contact Paul Mara at RYA HQ."

From the winter 2005 edition of Wavelength (the RYA Instructor magazine) it appears to stem from a single incident in 2001, where pacing was just one of the contributing factors to an incident where two people were injured.

Seems like a total ban on teaching it may possibly be OTT.

John
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Old 17 December 2007, 10:22   #5
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Another article:

http://www.ryatraining.org/NR/rdonly...maccidents.pdf

Although in the one above, I think it would have more sensible if the osprey was the lead boat, and the smaller rigiflex was following.
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Old 17 December 2007, 10:47   #6
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imho

being a realist;
I enjoyed pacing and the opportunity it gave to some of my students in their learning, while under supervision,
however; and it is only imho you have to think what the level of standard required for a RYA powerboat instructor is, and in terms of personal driving standard, and understanding of the risks that could/ can develop doing this, I can see why the RYA did what they did. To let one, or two pbi's control this activity hmmmmmmm; whereas put it into a advanced instructors range of skills to teach/ coach with, then I think that is a very different matter.

and yes I do know there are some fantastic PBI's out there.
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Old 17 December 2007, 11:14   #7
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This activity is more about managing risk.

Yes it was good fun but the reason its not in the syllabus is there are some pretty obvious risks associated with encouraging students to drive high speed craft close to each other.

I think the RYA have quite rightly said the benefit of this activity does not outweigh the risk and accordingly stated it has no place in their courses.

If you feel your students would benefit from this kind of training their is nothing to stop you running pacing sessions outside of your RYA training, I would have thought however if their was ever an accident you would ahve to have a pretty good reason for digressing from the NGB. Excitment and good fun would not cut the mustard in a liability/negligence case.

Let me compare this to other activities we run. On the zap cat experience we run time trials with one boat at a time. Why do you think we dont race them against each other straight boat on boat? Simple really we can include all of the speed, high speed handling, excitment and competition without the risk of two high speed powerboats in close proximity. All the gain without the pain (risk).

What gain does learning pacing have for most advanced students - very little.

For the police and RNLI etc who sometimes have to stop run away boats this is an obvius building block in learning high speed coming alongside.
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Old 17 December 2007, 11:48   #8
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if you have an instructor who knows his stuff then there is an advantage in that if nothing else it teaches you how power boats will or might behave when close quartered at speed

for most ,they will never have to put it into effect but I for one thought it useful
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Old 17 December 2007, 11:49   #9
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I agree with Dougs comments. What benefit is it to a student to learn pacing. It is very dangerous if carried out incorrectly. I train my helmsman in pacing as it is a safe way of transferring crew between craft in less favourable conditions. This training is usually undertaken with the marine police alongside their launch or Rib.
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Old 17 December 2007, 12:02   #10
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if you have an instructor who knows his stuff then there is an advantage in that if nothing else it teaches you how power boats will or might behave when close quartered at speed

for most ,they will never have to put it into effect but I for one thought it useful
Fair enough however we teach our students not to drive close quartered at speed.
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