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Old 17 September 2017, 15:51   #1
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Old school or "new school" and technology ?

I know that some UK (very good and fantastic reputation boats) still made use traditional technology like laminated plywood etc.

A lot of fantastic RIB boats are heavy, solid like rocks.

But some companies started to use infusion, molded structures.

RIBEYE, Hydrosport.

Even new models of Parker boats (not RIB) started this year are stepped hulls made use infusion technology. When I asked why - customer request to have better fuel economy and speed.

But I know that heavy and solid boat is still better for offshore.
Even @office888 when compared new ZODIAC 2017 and prev models stated that probably for offshore he would select "old" heavier model.

So is there a room for new less weight boats ? Deeper hull or any other features ? Or still offshore boat (RIB) have to be heavy ?

I'm beginner so want to know what more experience persons thinks.
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Old 18 September 2017, 02:50   #2
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I guess only time will tell how good the new generation of lightweight boats are. While modern lightweight engineered solutions might result in the same strength as previous over engineering, the engineers don't always get it right
Think fourth rail bridge v old fourth road bridge!
I've repaired several racing rowing boats built ultra light with honeycomb cores and there a Pita to repair. The laminated shell is difficult to strengtgen without adding weight and there also prone to water ingress between the core
Wether ribs suffer the same in future remains to be seen.
Personally I'm in the old school easy to repair or modify camp but time will tell if modern techniques make for better longer lasting boats!
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Old 18 September 2017, 03:18   #3
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I'm thinking about 7m "new school".

What be better, 7,4m light deep V RIB (hoping to fit boat between waves crests)
Or "old school" 6m boat ? This is the question

I saw in Greece 10y old boats from both schools in the same good conditions but they had not so many hrs (like 200 - 300 hrs).

Let's forgot about school and material.

For example I can be in my towing limit with Hydrosport 737
And can't be in tow limit with Redbay 6,1
One of the factor is probably stronger and heavier Hypalon in Redbay ...

Now I don't know if go for bigger but not heavy (to be in my towing limit).
Unfortunately changed car to the same (Honda Odyssey) but newer with the same towing limit 1550 kg (even with towing package).
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Old 18 September 2017, 05:26   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MatFromPoland View Post
I'm thinking about 7m "new school".

What be better, 7,4m light deep V RIB (hoping to fit boat between waves crests)
Or "old school" 6m boat ? This is the question

I saw in Greece 10y old boats from both schools in the same good conditions but they had not so many hrs (like 200 - 300 hrs).

Let's forgot about school and material.

For example I can be in my towing limit with Hydrosport 737
And can't be in tow limit with Redbay 6,1
One of the factor is probably stronger and heavier Hypalon in Redbay ...

Now I don't know if go for bigger but not heavy (to be in my towing limit).
Unfortunately changed car to the same (Honda Odyssey) but newer with the same towing limit 1550 kg (even with towing package).
Matt if you want a rib for towing and you have a weight limit then of course the new school but if the want a rib to cope with different sea conditions and not just calm and flat water then the old school is the way to go
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Old 18 September 2017, 10:45   #5
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What I like in an offshore RIB:
  • Shoebox type hull-deck joint
  • Mechanically attached tube
  • Anti-stuffing reinforcing plates in the bow
  • Big spray deflecting chines
  • Minimal planing pad
  • Steep deadrise at the transom
  • Spray deflecting chines

Bonus:
  • Infusion process
  • Vinylester resin
  • Full-length stringer assembly
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Old 18 September 2017, 14:28   #6
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Originally Posted by MatFromPoland View Post
... stepped hulls made use infusion technology. When I asked why - customer request to have better fuel economy and speed.
interesting I thought the trend towards resin infusion was driven by:
  • need to use less resin "just in case" = saving money
  • less resin = faster curing = higher throughput
  • the process means less styrene fumes for the workforce to inhale

of course customers might be asking for lighter boats too, or they might be spinning the "it actually saves us money" into "our process adds value to you".
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Old 18 September 2017, 14:29   #7
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interesting I thought the trend towards resin infusion was driven by:
  • need to use less resin "just in case" = saving money
  • less resin = faster curing = higher throughput
  • the process means less styrene fumes for the workforce to inhale

of course customers might be asking for lighter boats too, or they might be spinning the "it actually saves us money" into "our process adds value to you".
Resin is heavy and brittle. It doesn't add strength.

More glass adds strength.
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Old 18 September 2017, 14:30   #8
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but if the want a rib to cope with different sea conditions and not just calm and flat water then the old school is the way to go
from a hull strength perspective or because a heavy boat is more "planted" in the water? if the later is a new school boat with ballast tanks the solution - heavy when you want it but efficient when it doesn't need to be?
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Old 18 September 2017, 14:31   #9
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Resin is heavy and brittle. It doesn't add strength.

More glass adds strength.
I'm aware of that - what's your point?
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Old 18 September 2017, 14:34   #10
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I'm aware of that - what's your point?
Two boats with the same layup schedule, the infused boat will be lighter because less resin will be utilized. It will also be a stronger boat because of the less likely chance of a stress riser developing in a puddle of unsupported resin.

The drive to use less resin is driven by that fact that too much resin is just as bad as not enough.

Infusion guarantees "ideal mix / ideal coverage".
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