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Old 26 June 2009, 07:06   #1
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Oil Burning engines

For all who use diesel engines whether it be cars our boats check out his website www.audi-sport.net/vb/showthread.php?t=48309 these tests were conducted by Audi. I and a few friends have started using 2 stroke oil in our cars and have noticed some improvement, my friends L400 Delica which was having injector trouble when accelerating has all but gone. I have not found the Audi page with the info on yet, but I'll keep looking!

Lee
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Old 26 June 2009, 07:32   #2
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most injector cleaners are basicaly a light oil with a few so called benefical additives ,
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Old 26 June 2009, 15:57   #3
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Kerosene/parrafin works even better and is cheaper - also white spirit - jet fuel and even petrol - diesels will burn any old crap!!!

And of course there's good old cooking oil. Remember castor oil is still one of the best 2 stroke lubes - it's where the name Castrol comes from!!!
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Old 26 June 2009, 16:49   #4
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Kerosene/parrafin works even better and is cheaper - also white spirit - jet fuel and even petrol - diesels will burn any old crap!!!

And of course there's good old cooking oil. Remember castor oil is still one of the best 2 stroke lubes - it's where the name Castrol comes from!!!
I cant disagree with a word you say on this topic codders .. wasnt it the case that during the 40/50's someone developed and engine for the British army specifically to burn almost anything, after Herr Diesel came up with the idea? like even if you could thin creosote out enough it would work fine ?
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Old 26 June 2009, 19:51   #5
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I cant disagree with a word you say on this topic codders .. wasnt it the case that during the 40/50's someone developed and engine for the British army specifically to burn almost anything, after Herr Diesel came up with the idea? like even if you could thin creosote out enough it would work fine ?
Don't know about that but wouldn't be suprised. The most important thing is the viscosity - the thinner the better. If you had a tank heater or were in the desert you could run on lard I suppose.

Then again an older Discovery is about as multi fuel as you can get - 7 different ones at the same time is my record(abroad of course)...........
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Old 27 June 2009, 03:07   #6
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Heres one although not British made by jeep I think

http://www.surplusandoutdoors.com/sh...ct-547646.html
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Old 27 June 2009, 10:40   #7
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like most large deisel engines on ships that run on the really heavy oil ,the fuel is pre heated to thin it out before it goes into the injectors .
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Old 27 June 2009, 18:22   #8
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The important thing to remember is that there is a world of difference between your average marine / army / tractor diesel engine and the diesel engine in a modern diesel car.

A lot of work has gone in to achieving low emissions and high performance from ever smaller and lighter diesel engines. Amongst many other 'improvements' tolerances between components in fuel pumps and injectors have got much tighter.

In a previous life I worked for a filtration company developing fuel filters for a number of car manufacturers, and the fuel cleanliness requirements to achieve the design life for the fuel system components were extremely tight. Personally, I wouldn't add anything to diesel fuel that could effect viscosity / lubricity / filterability.

Cheers

Chris
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Old 27 June 2009, 18:28   #9
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The important thing to remember is that there is a world of difference between your average marine / army / tractor diesel engine and the diesel engine in a modern diesel car.

A lot of work has gone in to achieving low emissions and high performance from ever smaller and lighter diesel engines. Amongst many other 'improvements' tolerances between components in fuel pumps and injectors have got much tighter.

In a previous life I worked for a filtration company developing fuel filters for a number of car manufacturers, and the fuel cleanliness requirements to achieve the design life for the fuel system components were extremely tight. Personally, I wouldn't add anything to diesel fuel that could effect viscosity / lubricity / filterability.

Cheers

Chris
I agree you need to avoid thicker fuels. I changed the fuel filter on my Discovery - first time in 75,000 miles - it was spotless!!!

Some of the "modern" engines out there aren't so modern after all - the Passat I hired a few months ago still had the original 1.9tdi engine in it - yuch!!!

I know one bloke with one of the latest Mercs which he runs on neat cooking oil - he has a heated tank.

Lubricity is improved considerably by cooking oil. The US army have been using jet fuel/kerosene in all their diesel engines and they use lubricity enhancers to compensate - only needed in very hot countries though.
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Old 27 June 2009, 20:57   #10
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Originally Posted by chris123 View Post
The important thing to remember is that there is a world of difference between your average marine / army / tractor diesel engine and the diesel engine in a modern diesel car.

A lot of work has gone in to achieving low emissions and high performance from ever smaller and lighter diesel engines. Amongst many other 'improvements' tolerances between components in fuel pumps and injectors have got much tighter.

In a previous life I worked for a filtration company developing fuel filters for a number of car manufacturers, and the fuel cleanliness requirements to achieve the design life for the fuel system components were extremely tight. Personally, I wouldn't add anything to diesel fuel that could effect viscosity / lubricity / filterability.

Cheers

Chris
True, althought there does seem to be a good number of people running waste vegetable oil through their newish VW TDI engines without problems (good filtration is key however). I have a naturally aspirated diesel engine (TD42) in my Nissan Patrol and am planning to install an auxillary long range tank for WVO. I have just added a Racor 12 fuel filter (with the clear lexan bowl at the bottom) as a pre-filter to the stock fuel filter. This way I can readily see if anything undesireable is (most likely water) is making its way into the fuel system.
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