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Old 13 September 2004, 12:28   #1
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Country: Ireland
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Boat name: an t-easnach
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oarlocks

the options of back up for a single engine failure seem to me to be:

1. 2 engines (same fuel? same battery? reduced efficiency? high cost?)

2. small back-up engine (better but clumsy, dont fancy attaching it in a panic

3. paddling like crazy hawaii 5 -oh style

What do ye think of extendable light paddles attached to oarlocks mounted on sponsons uses as you sit backwards on jockey seat?
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:31   #2
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The Solent and, I think, certain other areas of the south English coast is covered by an organisation called Seastart which is like the AA or RAC for boat owners. Not sure if you have anything similar in Ireland though! I think the web address is www.seastart.co.uk

Edit: re your edit - I guess whether this is a realistic option or not depends on several factors, e.g. boat size/weight, distance offshore, weather/tidal conditions, fitness of rower(s). I reckon it might be OK in a boat your size, in favourable conditions and not too far offshore!
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:36   #3
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Thanks Louise, by the time they got out to me I'd have drifted to the US Coast Guard area! I spend most of my time between 50yards to 1 mile offshore and though the rowing could be hard, I'd FEEL more comfortable knowing I could tip in bit by bit if needs be.
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:39   #4
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If you can easily, safely and cheaply make any necessary modifications then, yeah, you might as well go for it! Anything that means you feel safer and are less likely to need external assistance has got to be a good idea, IMHO. If you go ahead, do let us know how you get on with any mods.
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:42   #5
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Don't want to spoil your enthusiasm, but I very much doubt you'd be able to row a 5.2m boat back to shore if there was even just a bit of tide and wind against you.
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:49   #6
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Country: Ireland
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fair comment, i wouldn't put in an olympic qualifying time but i spent years rowing currachs and if i could make slow progress i'd get there. very little current in big wide 100ft galway Bay, wind usually w - sw blowing back to shore
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Old 13 September 2004, 12:54   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin
Don't want to spoil your enthusiasm, but I very much doubt you'd be able to row a 5.2m boat back to shore if there was even just a bit of tide and wind against you.
You are right up to a point, sure you canít row into the wind and tide but you can change your direction. My boat has a couple of paddles and we can move it on a still day. Having said that it is hard work.
Des
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Old 13 September 2004, 15:08   #8
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I've not actually ever tried it myself, but alot of the old local fisherman scull their dinghys. By this I mean they have a rowlock or slot in the transom and use one paddle and move it side to side, I suppose a little bit like the tail of a fish works.

So maybe sculling might be an option if if you have wind in your favour, no tide and all you need is a bit of directional control.
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Old 13 September 2004, 21:55   #9
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I've twice had the misfortune to have to row a 4m rescue rib fitted with oarlocks, both times in a river with 3 knot current. I'd normally expect to row a 4m boat easily, but rowing this thing is just horrible. There was no way I could even maintain my position, just guide my progress (?) as Des says.
The tubes are not stiff enough to support the oar properly, even with the rowlock mounted on a 8" long piece of stiff plastic bonded to the tube, with even moderate force the rowlock twists forward and the oar tries to jump out the top. Better than nothing in a small boat where a standby engine is not possible especially if you're on your own, I'm afraid that you'll have limited success on a larger boat. If you do go ahead, try to fit a fully enclosed ring of some kind that the oat cannot jump out of.
If you want a pic of the arrangement on this boat let me know and i'll post it after Hurrican Ivan has passed through, if we still have the boat!
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Old 14 September 2004, 00:21   #10
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The sheerpin went on my 3.5 on the back of a 10 ft rib,with my wife and seven year old son as passengers,proper rowlocks and oars in a slight chop across the wind,I made it but it was very hard work,it was a half mile stretch and I had to crab cross it trying to keep the bow towards the wind which kept blowing off,certanly wouldnt fancy rowing in anything bigger!!
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