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Old 25 September 2016, 02:08   #11
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That is going to change the whole balance and probably have a negative effect on the performance of the boat. .
Overstating it a bit.....it will have a similar effect to one person moving from the middle of the boat to the back seat.

Taking to a petrol sodden deck with an electric angle grinder is likely to have a more sudden and catastrophic effect on the value of the boat.
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Old 25 September 2016, 03:37   #12
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Moving the tank on deck will also change the initial static stability, has it any significant impact is another story.

Would it help to fill the tank and surrounding void with water(after emptying as much as fuel as possible). Then leaving the tank 100% full but lowering the water level in the void with an inch, then using the multi-tool to cut the deck,trying not to get electric shock.... Boat need to be securely on cradle, even keel and no list to do this obviously.
Can be dangerous, never tried, using a hand saw would reduce the risk as the you can keep the also the void 100% full.
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Old 25 September 2016, 09:52   #13
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Novurania fuel tank leak repair

Just fill the tank and void with with water before you cut. It's only the evaporated gas in an inclosed space that you need to worry about. If it's filled with water it won't go boom. As far as electric shock just get a 110 grinder and transformer. Used many a 110 electric saw to cut concrete with water spray.
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Old 25 September 2016, 23:58   #14
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Novurania fuel tank leak repair

If you call Novurania they can probably provide drawing of where the tank is. As long as you are careful there should be no issues cutting it out . As suggested filling the tank with water will help however if it has a big leak not sure how much of a help
It will be. Keep everything well ventilated and you should be fine. Also depending on the year and model you make have an inspection port to look in and give yourself an idea of the space between the tank and deck. I've cut out Nautica and AB tanks using similar methods and had no issue.
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Old 26 September 2016, 02:27   #15
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If you abandon the tank. Don't fill it with expanding foam. Most expanding foams absorb liquids, such as water Or fuel and gain weight.

If you decide to cut it out, find out from manufacture how thick the deck is and location of tank. Then it's a grinder or Circular saw with depth set to depth of deck. cut on an angle, If you cut at an angle the deck bit will fit back into itself when your done without support. If you cut straight you will have to wedge or create a lip to hold the bit removed in place. I done this last year and regret my straight cuts because of the extra work.

Ps has the boat got a ply or moulded deck and what finish is it? Any pictures?
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Old 26 September 2016, 06:07   #16
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If you abandon the tank. Don't fill it with expanding foam. Most expanding foams absorb liquids, such as water Or fuel and gain weight.

?
The hole in the tank is probably tiny. the foam will seal it ant the integrity of the rest of the tank will prevent the foam becoming saturated.
You're equating this to the problems with the early "unsinkables" but the scenario with the foam enclosed in a more or less sealed tank that will not be subjected to continuous immersion is different.
There are also "closed cell" foams that are commonly used for buoyancy now.
Personally. I wouldn't like and "empty" petrol tank under my deck.
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Old 27 September 2016, 02:35   #17
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The hole in the tank is probably tiny. the foam will seal it ant the integrity of the rest of the tank will prevent the foam becoming saturated.
You're equating this to the problems with the early "unsinkables" but the scenario with the foam enclosed in a more or less sealed tank that will not be subjected to continuous immersion is different.
There are also "closed cell" foams that are commonly used for buoyancy now.
Personally. I wouldn't like and "empty" petrol tank under my deck.
What is the OP tank made of, glass, stainless, plastic, aluminium. That could change the fix considerably.

I'd sleep much better at night knowing it was fixed properly.

It would be interesting to know what foam you used last tango. I am thinking of experimenting with foam on a different project but there are not many supplies available in U.K.

In a can expanding foams are generally not closed cell, the ones that are, only are if their outside membrane is not damaged, they are also moisture cured which means in a tank he might end up with a solid outside and a cake like mixture in the middle. Porable 2 part foams in U.K. Are mostly low density and most are destroyed by solvents and fuel. Vibration causes them to break down and then loose closed cell properties. If the tank is stainless or aluminium any moisture trapped could cause crevice corrosion so may lead to an accelerated decay. Any bodge is gonna de value it, and by the time someone has spent money on a posh pu foam that is closed cell, solvent resistant and then he has hidden all evidence of the filler and breather, it would be cheaper to just learn how to fix it. A hole in a tank is a hole. No matter how big it is, I wish the previous owner of my boat new how just one little hole into the structure of the boat would cause so much damage. A water logged boat is almost a right off eventually.

If the tank in OP boat is grp or plastic and it's a small leak. There are some resins that will patch and hold for about 5. Plastic padding leak fix works, and Scott badder sell ethanol safe vinylester resins. Depends what it's made of, how big the leak is etc etc and how consiencuius the owner is ultimately.
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Old 27 September 2016, 12:42   #18
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A couple of examples:-
Illbruck FM617 High Yield Expanding Foam (Hand Held) 540ml

Buoyancy Foam & Flotation Foam

These foams are waterproof and don't need moisture to cure.
Regards the crevice corrosion...probably, but in a redundant tank ? Who cares.
My point is, whatever you do is going to be a "bodge", the prat of a manufacturer who sealed a consumable item under the deck has already defined that.
Replacing it is no doubt a better option but you're still going to have to get an expensive tank made and fake up the deck when you're finished. That's going to do nothing for the value of the boat.
My regular mechanic was killed removing the petrol tank from a car and that was designed to be removable so it's not something to be undertaken lightly.

As my original post said the solution is not perfect but it's a cheap, safe quick fix.
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Old 28 September 2016, 04:42   #19
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Any other repair solutions other than cutting deck an replacing tank? Ideas or your experience with an alternative fix for this appreciated

Dobo,

By any chance, have you contacted Novurania and asked them for advice and for a solution?

I'm guessing they would have better knowledge than us about this but then again, who knows; they were the culprits to glass in the tank.
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Old 28 September 2016, 05:54   #20
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I don't know what the problem is here sailrib and what good the maker will be other than tell you where the tank is located.

You have 2 choices, do it properly or fit another tank. Once you decide which way to go then get on with it.

If the boat is worth the hassle then flush the tank with water and drain out bung or whatever way you can. Vent it extremely well and get cutting the deck up.

If this is too much hassle then fit a plastic tank somewhere else, it won't make a huge difference to ride quality or resale. Just now the boat is worth far less without a working tank and you won't recover the cost of ripping the deck up either so can't win with that one.

Myself and last Tango know someone with such a problem and they fitted a plastic tank, you wouldn't know it was using one as it is hidden under a bench seat.
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