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Old 21 March 2013, 15:48   #1
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Novice to RIB

Greetings to all!
I am a new member to RIBnet.
I grew up in the deep south of the USA and have been an outdoorsman all my life. Over the years I have used various johnboats while hunting and fishing, yet now am thinking of purchasing a RIB because they are compact and light in weight.
Also, my wife and I are campers and would like to have a boat for fishing in state parks and rivers. I have about settled on a 9.8 hp. Nissan Outboard and am looking at SeaBright 9’6”.
I have a few questions to ask the forum of seasoned RIB owners.
Please let me add that we don’t plan on getting into any heavily wooded areas as a duck hunter would.
How durable are RIBs against sunken stumps, drifting wood, and rocks?
If I encounter a puncture while on the water is there an extreme danger of going down?
Yes I am a novice; thus I ask.
I will appreciate any comments or suggestions you may have about my questions and choice of boat and motor. And thanks from Home of the Blues.
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Old 21 March 2013, 16:12   #2
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Welcome OleMiss.
Firstly, I think we have to agree on terminology. A RIB is stricktly a Rigid-hulled Inflatable Boat. In other words it has a hard hull and is rather heavy! I think you are talking about what we call SIBs i.e. a fully inflatable boat, judging by your weight arguments.
In which case your point about tree-stumps, rocks etc are very valid-they would damage your boat (to an extent).
A RIB tends to be rather more resilient as "only" the GRP or fibre-glass would be impacted.
There are various ways in which this potential damage can be minimised however;
-try not to hit ANYTHING
-you should try to select a boat that has several chambers to the tube section. Thus if one gets punctured, the boat at least stays afloat (sort of!).
-try to run your outboard engine high when you reach shallow water-perhaps by not locking it down

I am sure others, more knowledgeable than I, will be along in a minute............
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Old 21 March 2013, 16:39   #3
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Thanks Brian! I am looking at a RIB. The way I was looking at the weight was a bit off. But I was comparing it to a heavier dressed out Johnboat with seats, etc (Seabright RIB 290H @ 109 lb. against 200+ lb. I should have been more specific.......Yet thanks for your insight. The more I learn; certianly for the better!
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Old 22 March 2013, 03:50   #4
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One other thing to consider is what the tubes are made from.

Hypalon seems to be the most durable and if you puncture it, it can be patched for example.

Some ribs use a form of PVC for the tubes. It is quite tough, but if punctured, can be a specialist job to repair.
There is a more in depth conversation on the merits of each on this ribnet thread:
Hypalon VS PVC-fabric
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Old 22 March 2013, 03:56   #5
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Further to what Nik was saying, here is a real-life situation "saved" by having Hypalon rather than PVC as a tube fabric.

Round the UK 2003
Read the pen-ultimate paragraph. Waves were about .5metres in height at the time.
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