Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 29 July 2013, 10:33   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 28
Newbie Help - Using my Honwave

Hi there, first time poster and boater so please forgive any complete ignorance or stupidity in these questions!! I'd be really grateful if any of you could take the time to help me out.

I recently purchased a Honwave T-30AE, and have taken it out on the water a couple of times around the Christchurch area. The second time I launched at Wick Lane and learnt a lot navigating it through all the boat traffic. I have a 2.3hp Honda four stroke outboard which is owned by my landlord but he lets me use it.

I intend to use the Honwave as a small inshore fishing boat, and have some questions after my recent experiences:

1. I can see with the 2.3hp I am actually the slowest thing in the whole ocean, however I am a bit shocked at the prices for a 10hp Honda. What other makes are a bit more reasonable but still offer good reliability and where should I look for good second hand engine?

2. Would the 2.3hp be dangerous in the sense that I might not be able to steam against tidal flow? In particular I am thinking at the entrance to Christchurch harbour, but we seemed to get through it ok. What states of tide and timings of tide should I watch out for?

3. I seemed a bit stuck without a gps - we were just fishing blindly off Hengistbury Head and getting snagged all the time. I need one therefore, but I also would like a fishfinder. I can however only find one combo unit thats in my price range, (Humminbird Fishfinder 581i HD DI Combo). Would this be able to run in my boat on batteries, or would it need full rigging up to power? Would two seperate units be as economical? I have found the humminbird for 181.

4. We managed to snag the anchor against some rocks and had to cut it off after much heaving. Has anyone got any tips on freeing a stuck anchor.

5. Could anyone point me in the right direction concerning navigation charts for the area, possibly online?

Any further advice on boat ownership, good launching spots in the area, safety and fishing from a dinghy much appreciated.

Stuart
__________________

__________________
Stuzzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29 July 2013, 11:14   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
Hi Stuart - firstly welcome!

There are a few of us who know Chirstchurch well who I am sure will comment in due course.

where to start ?.....

Engine - walk up to Mike Vincent at South Coast Outboards in Bridge street or Simon at Ribs Marine . They can both be very bust at the mo - so bear with them and ask about 10hp ish motors and what they may have. Or do the ebay route etc

2.3 hp - You wont get in the run with that when its at full flow - you'd end up having to walk it round the end of Mudeford Spit - which is fine , but not a fun way to spend 20 minutes ! If you use it - only aim to get in or out an hour either side of either low or high water ( depending on which way your going!) . It can also get rather choppy at the entrance (read that as ' unpleasant' in a SIB) due to the waves bouncing back off the quay and the sandbank.

GPS etc I'll stay out of as I have no clue !

Sounds like you managed to find the line of rocks that run South out from Hengistbury head ( beerpan rocks from memory) - whcih catch lots of stuff - anchors, boats, gearboxes etc ) . Good fishing though by all accounts .

Again have a walk up bridge street and just after mike you'll find Christchurch boat shop ( tucked away on the left) - they will have a suitable chart , or something like http://www.visitmyharbour.com/

All in all its a great place to boat - but can be very busy with a small fast running entrance and lots of boats. But once you've mastered it its huge fun.

Happy to go for a spin out with you for a look around.

Pete
__________________

__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 05:35   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 28
Thanks for the advice Peter, that's really helpful. So I would need to possibly drag the boat over the spit - didn't think of that, but some handy info if I get stuck!
__________________
Stuzzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 07:19   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuzzer View Post
Thanks for the advice Peter, that's really helpful. So I would need to possibly drag the boat over the spit - didn't think of that, but some handy info if I get stuck!
Not really over. More walk it round the end in the shallow water, one not though it shelves steeply on the spit side of the run...virtually 45' ..so don't try and wade out to far!
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 08:08   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 28
Thanks again.. Any tips on freeing an anchor Peter?
__________________
Stuzzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 08:19   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuzzer View Post
Thanks again.. Any tips on freeing an anchor Peter?
Try not to think about it ...or wait until low tide and go for a swim (I know a good diver who'll go get it if you know where it is ...but he'll cost more than a new one ! )

If you do a search on here there are several threads about 'technique'...
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 11:42   #7
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuzzer View Post
Thanks again.. Any tips on freeing an anchor Peter?
I'm not Peter, but this is what I do.

When weighing anchor (directions relative to a static position, i.e. the direction your boat sits at rest relative to the anchor):

1) Don't use the anchor rode to pull the boat to the anchor's location. Use the motor to idle forward as you take up the slack, until you are at or slightly beyond the hook-up site, then start pulling. Alternating pull and slack may "bounce" the hook loose.

2) If the anchor does not come loose, slack the line and motor a good distance further on ( like a hundred feet or so, if you have enough rode) and try again, which should pull the hook out more horizontally. Should that not work, do the same, but offset even with the site of the hookup, but off to the side. Then try the other side. You are trying to get different angles on the anchor to get it loose from whatever it's hung up on.

3) If all else fails, use the motor to try and break it loose (tie off the rode, and motor back to break it loose.) Use caution, as there will be a surge when something does give - make sure everyone is seated and braced for the movement. Be aware that you may well damage the anchor or break a line or shackle doing this. Use gradual power, not sudden throttle inputs, and watch the boat's reaction under power so as not to swamp the boat.

4) If nothing works, note the location, and be prepared to pay a diver to recover the anchor. Or eat the loss.


If you're anchoring in areas that are prone to snagging the hook, get an anchor with an eye forward of the flukes (or whatever it has to hold), and rig a trip line (enough strong line to reach the surface and a float.) It will help by allowing you to pull from the front of the anchor rather than levering from the end of the shank.

Luck;

jky
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 16:52   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
I've never lost one (I don't stop much....)
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 17:40   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,250
Anchor: All of what's already been said. Plus if you need to dump it and would be able to return at different tide etc attach a float to the top of the line (fender?)

If its choppy you can use the boat's bouyancy to your advantage, provided your tubes are properly pumped up.
- Get the boat over the anchor so the line is dropping dead vertical. (motor rather than pull the anchor line as mentioned above).
- Take all the slack out of the line.
- take a turn round the most secure fitting you have on the boat like a cleat. As the boat drops down a wave take in the slack so that in a 2ft wave you've probably just pulled in 2ft of rope when you get to the trough of the wave. As you hit the bottom cleat off the rope and use the bouyancy of the boat pulling up against the wave to pull the line.
- The Honwave has 43cm tubes and is 3m long, Volume of tube = 140litres. 1litre of air displaces 1litre of water which weighs 1kg. So will exert 10N of force. So an empty Honwave with no outboard or crew would exert a force of up to 1400N... A typical man can pul a 75lb object on a rope a pull of about 340N. So you have the potential to exert a much greater pull.
- No waves? You can create the same effect by bouncing the bow.
- BEWARE - if you really are snagged and the waves are big enough you can pull the bow under so you mustn't tie the rope off just belay it round something so that if you are about to flood the bow you can release it.
- Can take several bounces of pull like this to pull free.

Still stuck?
if you don't have a spare boat to hand Attach as big a float as you can find - all your fenders?
Take a seperate length of rope. Tie a bowline with the anchor line running through the bight (loop) of the bowline. Attach a heavy weight to the bight and drop it over the side keeping hold of the other end. You are aiming for the bight to get over the stem of the anchor. Now slowly pay out as much line as you've got so that the pull on this line will be as close to horizontal as possible. Travel in the direction opposite to the anchor was pulled when it was doing what you wanted it to. Now use the engine to slowly pull back against the anchor stem...
__________________
ShinyShoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 July 2013, 17:56   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuzzer View Post
1. I can see with the 2.3hp I am actually the slowest thing in the whole ocean, however I am a bit shocked at the prices for a 10hp Honda. What other makes are a bit more reasonable but still offer good reliability and where should I look for good second hand engine?
The Tohatsu 9.8 (2 smoke) is considered the holygrail of SIB engines. Best compromise for weight power etc.

Quote:
3. I seemed a bit stuck without a gps - we were just fishing blindly off Hengistbury Head and getting snagged all the time.
How are you expecting the GPS to help with that?

Quote:
I need one therefore, but I also would like a fishfinder.
I think that'd help you not get snagged more than GPS. Not saying you don't need GPS but I think in terms of knowing whats under you a fishfinder will help far more.

Quote:
I can however only find one combo unit thats in my price range, (Humminbird Fishfinder 581i HD DI Combo). Would this be able to run in my boat on batteries, or would it need full rigging up to power?
You need a 12V power supply. That could be a 12V battery. Your little honda presumabaly has no power output so you cant recharge the battery. It draws 400mA. So you could probably use one of those mobile car starting packs: 12v 8Ah Car Battery Jump Starter Booster Air Compressor on eBay! (other models exist) and expect 12-14hours before you'd flatten it. Trouble is keeping all that sh*t dry as its not designed for marine use... If you had a feed from the engine you could re-charge it easy enough. You could probably use something like a burglar alarm battery too but they have relatively low capacity so maybe 3-4 hours.

Quote:
Any further advice on boat ownership, good launching spots in the area, safety and fishing from a dinghy much appreciated.
Do powerboat 2 course.
Have you got VHF radio?
Lifejackets
Kill cord.
__________________

__________________
ShinyShoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:25.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.