Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 21 April 2014, 13:45   #1
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Tsawwassen
Make: Caribe
Length: under 3m
Engine: Yamaha 2.5
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
New to inflatables Help!

Greetings, I just purchased an older (2003) 9.5 ft Caribe RIB. Can anyone tell me what the correct air pressure is and do I really need a pressure gauge? I will likely get one anyway, but in the mean time, I'm looking for some advise regarding use of the foot pump. I found some information relating to a different manufacturer, and they stated that you couldn't over inflate their brand of boat using their foot pump. Is this a general rule that applies to Caribe or something that is specific to their brand? Any suggestions for telling when I'm getting close to the correct pressure?
Thanks in advance.
__________________

__________________
Cyborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 April 2014, 16:34   #2
Member
 
Locozodiac's Avatar
 
Country: Other
Town: Lima-Peru
Boat name: Nautile
Make: Sea Rider Boats
Length: 4m +
Engine: Tohatsu 18 /30 HP
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,706
Welcome to Ribnet,

Usually all sibs and ribs must be inflated between 3.0 psi minimum and 3.5 psi maximum, that's for tubes and inflatable keel as well. Get yourself a cheap hand pump Bravo Alu 4, comes fitted with a gauge, that way will read while inflating it. 3.0 is opt specially for summer issues.

In order to blow a tube inflating with a foot pump will need to be Hulk standing on that pump. But you could blow a thin fabric inflatable, the cheapo kind for kids.

Happy Boating
__________________

__________________
Locozodiac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 April 2014, 13:01   #3
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Tsawwassen
Make: Caribe
Length: under 3m
Engine: Yamaha 2.5
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Thanks Locozodiac.
If I'm ever in Lima, I'll buy you a beer. I'm quickly learning about RIB's. Found out there is a leak between two of the chambers. Think I'll just live with it. At least it's been a cheap lesson so far. I didn't pay a lot for this thing and it looks pretty sitting in my garage.
__________________
Cyborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 April 2014, 12:56   #4
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Ventura
Boat name: Roberta
Make: Valco Baja Bayrunner
Length: 6m +
Engine: Honda 135 Outboard
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 2
Cyborg, you could look into getting the boat casted. If it is a small leak where it is hard to patch, casting can work very well. It is cheap and functional. Gotta get that boat in the water!
__________________
Brently is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 April 2014, 15:54   #5
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Tsawwassen
Make: Caribe
Length: under 3m
Engine: Yamaha 2.5
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Thanks for the suggestion Brently, but I'm not sure what you mean. I tried to google "inflatable casting", but didn't find anything other than some strange unmentionable things that have nothing to do with boating. I'm guessing that it's some sort of goo that goes inside and you get your wife to hold the RIB for a couple of hours in such a way that it seals the leak. Something like that might be a good thing for one small, slow leak that I have besides the leak between chambers. This leak is near or maybe in a seam and was was previously patched. I understand leaks at seams can be a bit more of a challenge. Anyway, if you could enlighten me on casting it would be appreciated.
__________________
Cyborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 April 2014, 17:25   #6
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Ventura
Boat name: Roberta
Make: Valco Baja Bayrunner
Length: 6m +
Engine: Honda 135 Outboard
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 2
I went and spoke with our boat service manager. He repairs inflatables and regularly casts them when needed. He told me first thing, casting is a last resort. He pours liquid latex through the valves. We charge about 70 bucks a quart and one quart is generally good for one chamber. We buy the latex in 3 gallon containers. It is a great solution when you don't have access to patch/repatch the leak.

Once inside the chamber and the valves have been retightened, you may need to flip the boat over a few times and spread the latex around. If the leak is in a spot where the latex can collect on top of it, then you can just leave it in that position. It takes about two weeks for the latex to fully set inside of the chambers.

__________________
Brently is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 April 2014, 11:14   #7
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
There are several brands of internal sealant on the market. All are aimed for leaking tubes (inside to outside) rather than leaking baffles (one chamber to another.) Unless you can get the baffle to set up so it seals, an internal sealant won't help with the latter.

Personally I'd just run the boat as is (and I do - I've got the same problem, due to sun-induced over-pressurization.) Repair is possible (at least on a hypalon boat; don't know about a welded PVC tubeset) but fairly pricey. Just be aware that a major leak on the non-baffled side is going to cause things to go south pretty quick.

jky

Forgot to say: FWIW, I've never heard of "casting", either.
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 April 2014, 14:56   #8
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Tsawwassen
Make: Caribe
Length: under 3m
Engine: Yamaha 2.5
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Thanks jky. The leak in the baffle seems minor at the moment and I hope to ignore it as much as possible. I gather sealing the baffle would cost more than I paid for the boat. I'll just make sure I inflate each chamber a bit at a time, so I don't make it any worse. The RIB is hypalon, so it will be easier to patch from what I understand. I'll just take care of the small external leak as soon as things warm up and I acquire a dehumidifier. This thing will be powered by a 2.5 Yamaha, so if things do go south, at least it won't be at high speed. I'm boating in the Pacific North West, so I don't "plan" on going very far from shore. From what I understand this Caribe has enough foam in the hull to float without air in the tubes. Not something I want to test without a survival suit though.
__________________

__________________
Cyborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:42.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.